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Full text of "Antioch News 09/04/1992"

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Lipservice 






It's the talk 

of the town. 

Callus! 




Sports 
Spectacular 



Pattern for 
victory prep football. 

Seepullput. 



Labor Day 

Lakeland Newspapers 
wishes residents a safe 
and enjoyable lioliday| 
weekend. Our ofTices 
will be clQSfid«Sept 7. 




ntioch 




T^KTVOCH 



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i-)!JiV*t: 



Strert 



AN2757 10/25/92 **C-5 

ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

757 MAIN' STREET 

Antioch IL 63002 



;tKl>rter 

■ ei992-ASchnM 



A Schnwdar Publiedlon 



VOL. 106-NO. 36 



ANTIOCH, SEPTEMBER 4, 1992 



TWO SECTIONS-64 PAGES 500 PER COPY 



Antioch residents can donate items for victims 



.,.., — ..f. 



bj THOMAS STEVENS and scores of people homeless, the 

Lakeland Newspapers American people have rallied around and 

With damage in the billions of dollars are helping the disaster-torn people of 




South Florida and Louisiana. Antioch is 
no exception. 

Using the same momentum used to 
build the playground in Centennial Park 
earlier this year, a number of Antioch 
residents have signaled the rally cry and 
gathered their efforts at Keith Johnson 
Realty World to set up an Antioch Relief 
Drop Off Point for non- perishable items 
needed in the disaster zone. 

"Wc wanted to help out and we are 
trained to solicit for business," said E. 
Marie Beckman, who serves as a trainer 
and manager at Johnson Realty. "So now 
we are using our training to solicit 
donations." 

The whole office staff has volunteered 



part of their woricday to the relief effort 
which began on Aug 31. 

Sales Associate Sue Cherry, who has 
been promoting the effort to as many 
media outlets as possible, was able to 
even get the effort placed on the 
scoreboard at the Chicago Cubs vs. Los 
Angeles Dodgers game at Wrigley Field 
Monday night "I just called the media 
department and they took my 
information," said Cherry. ^ 

The main goal of the effort, said jh^jg 
Office's Broker MarciaBanike, is to >'jig ^qq 
a convienent place for Antioch L^y qjh 
residents to bring needed supplies so b, 
can get them into the hands of somehOu>^__ 
(Continued on Page 8) 



■"»»l»u. 



New ACHS teachers deal 
included some concessions 



Keith Johnson Realty's staff have donated their time to help with the relief 
efforts in Florida and Louisiana. Reality staffers from left to right are: Barb 
Renaud, Denise Schaufel, Laura Labicki, Mike Stanek, Bette Pierik, Marcia 
Banike, Kathy Biasius, and Susan Cherry. — Photo by Thomas Stevens. 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Maybe it's the economic climate in this 
country, but the new contract signed last 
week for Antioch High School teachers 
looks like a compromise between the 




school board and the teachers' union. 

The new contract, which really is an 
extension to the previous, will give the 
teachers the 3.98 percent salary increase 
they looked for, but will ask more of 
them in the future. 

AcccHxiing to Superintendent Dr. Robert 
Schley, the contract was ratified by the 
teachers' union on Aug. 19 and the school 
board passed the contract at its meeting on 
Aug. 20. 

For their salary increase, said Schley, 
the teachers will be required to increase 
(Continued on Page 8) 



INSIDE 

•Editorial 1244 

New union leadership. 

•Lakelife.-. 16-22 

Boom! Civil War revisited. 

•Business 23-25 

Inventions, inventions, inventions. 

•Obituaries..,,-.. 27 

•Qz^sffled. 27-35 

•Spbrts.... ...37-39 

Vtke's sub QB leads team. 



Tennis, Anyone? 

Angela Seitz. 14, rockets a tennis ball at her sister, Jenny. 12. as they take 
advantage of the remaining days of summer. Area residents have little time 
remaining before fall comes raging into Lake County and cool temperatures 
preside. This past summer has been unusually wet and cool. According to me 
National Weather Service, residents should expect more of the same this fall. — 
Photo by Gene Gabry 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 










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IN Sf olk 



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BUCKLEY RD. 



LIBERTY BUICK ^ r~| C 

EAGLE SUBARU V^ ^[l 



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2 Lak9lancl M«wfpap«r« 



Friday, Septombor 4, 1992 



mi 

til 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



i\ 




Lake 
ounty 

AtA 
Glance 



Village hopes 
for park grant OK 

WADSWORTH— Village officials 
are hopeful the Illinois Department of 
Conservation will look favorably on a re- 
quest for a $189,000 matching grant An 
IDOC representative visited 13-acre site 
surrounding village hall. An IDOC deci- 
sion of whether the plan merits a board 
hearing will be made in October or 
November. 



Former clerk will 
return money, tapes 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Former 
Village Clerk Donna LangeU 52, has been 
sentenced for stealing more than $15,000 
in village water bill collections last 
November and December. She will be on 
probation 30 months, make full restitu- 
tion of $16,454, undergo mental health 
and alcoholic counseling, do 200 hours of 
community service and return tapes of 
secretly-recOTded village hall telephone 



conversations. The sentence was negoti- 
ated in the court of Judge John Goshgar- 
ian. If Langel violates any of the condi- 
tions she is subject to six months in jail. 
She pleaded guilty to official misconduct 
for taking more than $50,000 in village 
receipts, most of it in the fomi of checks. 



Boards ponder 
development plans 

GRAYSLAKE— Plans for 667-acies 
of property off of Routes 45, 120 and 137 
are expected to be unveiled before 
Grayslake boards Sept S.The plan com- 
missicHi and zoning board of appeals are 
expected to hear plans for land now owned 
by Pkairie Holdings, a Lake County based 
cofporation. "The bulk of the land is R-1." 
Grayslake Village Manager Mike Ellis 
said. Two other zones, one of a shopping 
center and another for limited industrial, 
are also being sought 



Three generations 
opened new bank 

LIBERTYVILLE— Three genera- 
tions of Wonderlics and Clonts partici- 
pated in the groundbreaking ceremony 
that officially announced the opening of 
Libertyville Bank. The new bank is a 
branch of the Richmond Bank that the 
two families already own. The bank is 
located across the street from Adler Park 
on Milwaukee Avenue and is open for 
business. 



Emergency fund for 
fire victims started 

WAUCONDA— In efforts to help 
the LaPointe family get back on their 
feet neighbor Bob Schaewe and officers 



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standard features include: 
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Lights. 30 HP Johnson 
Outboard, 1,200-ib 
Shoreland'r Trailer. 
Out-the-Door $g QQS 
Price... ' 



iill^Lilne oi Lund Boats 






on the Williams Park Improvement 
Association have opened an Emergency 
fund in the family's name at Wauconda 
National Bank. Chi Aug. 21, a call was 

put in to the Wauconda Fire Department 
for a house fire at 28641 N. Main St in 
Williams Park. The Ore destroyed the 
entire home and all the possessions 
therein. Another fire occurred at the same 
address about three hours lat^. Firemen 
suspect the fires were set The LaPointe 
family, a mother and two girls, were in 
Kentucky on vacation at the time of the 
fires. Neighbors hope that residents will 
donate clothing, money, anything that 
will help the family ga back on 'their 
feet Neighbor Bob Schaewe can be 
reached at 526-2259 for any infoimation. 




OMO Jofinson 



..../;. 
n^K 



Buy American At . . 



C. HALING & SONS 



Full Seivlce Marina • Parts & Accessories 
*'Over 70 Years Of Customer Satisfaction" 



2-1/2 Miles W. Of Rie. 59 

On Grass Lake Rd. 

East Shore Of Grass Lake 

Antiocli 



BOAT SLIPS 




(708) 395-2250 

Hours: 

Daily 10 to 5 

Closed Mondays 



LAUNCH RAMP 



Police file sex 
abuse charges 

GRAYSLAKE— Grayslake Police 
Department is investigating several re- 
ported incidents of aggravated criminal 
sexual aibuse as reported by the victim, a 
male juvenile. The alleged offender, 
Rosemary L. Smith, age 34, of Wild- 
wood, has been charged with three counts 
of aggravated criminal sexual abuse and 
released from custody on a $40,000 rec- 
ognizance bond awaiting trial. Conrad 
Gutraj of the Grayslake police dq)artnient 
said the incidents came to the depart- 
ment's attention Aug. 24 with charges 
filed the next day. No couit date has been 
set 




Drug-prevention powwow 

Mickl Jones, left, explains a drug-abuse-prevention program to County Board 
Chairman Robert Depke during an open house at a new addiction-counseling 
center for westem Lake County. Politicians and education officials tumed 
out last week to show support for the center, part of the Northern Illinois 
Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse. NICASA will honor its top 
volunteers at a dinner Sept. 15 at Lamb's Farm in Libertyville. — Photo by Bill 
Carey 



ESTATE PLANNING 

SEMINAR 



AVOID PROBATE 

Xhis urformative and entertaining seminai* 

>vill shoM^ you lio>v proper planning can save 

time and thousands of dollars. 

You'll learn how to: 

■ Minimize estate taxes with an 

estate plan that includes a 
LIVING TRUST 

■ Reduce estate taxes. 

■ Avoid the lengthy and expensive 

probate process. 

■ Maintain privacy and control of your estate, 

■ Avoid multiple probates if you own property in 
more than one state. 



You should attend this seminar if your estate is in 
excess of $50,000, or you arc married, or you have minor 
children, or you own real estate in more than 1 slate. 
Speakers: 




^OL^ 



W 



ZVI POLSTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



ROBERT K. WEGGE 

ACCOUNTANT 

specializing in estate planning 




September 16, 1992 

7:30 p»ni. 

Hampton Inn 



Gurnee, IL 

(Jufil East of 194 on Crund Ave.) 



For Information & Reservations Call 

(708) 223-9200 

SEATING LIMITED 
KESERVATION REQUIRED 



I 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 



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'90 OLDS REGENCY BROUGHAM 

Loaded, leather, power ^9895 
sun toot, alarm ^■^^ 



'86 CHRYSLER 5TH AVE. 



Fully loaded, x-clean 
leather 





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OnV SO.OOO mi 
3fd8eal,dean 



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Bli»orwM1«,Mrto-.ilrconL, teOQC 

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BUDOET BUYS 










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'87 DODGE 600 S.E. 

Power ©very thing, caas., 
njns groat 



$2995 




'88 CHEVROLET IROC CAMARO 



VB, Cass., Loaded, 
Clean 




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•91 NISSAN PICKUP 

Only 3400 miles, like 
new, proat work truck .. 



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•88 FORD CROWN VICTORIA 

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E^i\ loaded * ^ ^^ 






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1 owner, air cond., iOQOR 

auto. , etc. stereo 7 O 7 7 













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6 cyl.. auto., air, tilt, 
•tereo 



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HiVi^liSI One owner, leather, 
SamMmMl g^nroof, caM.. PW. PL 



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owner, with sunroof . . . 



'86 CHRYSLER 5TH AVE. 

Loaded, leather, clean 

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'88 AEROSTAR VAN 



'91 FORD TEMPO 

Only 17K, bucket seats, 
like new, with cassette 



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owner, auto., air ^W w^ 



•82 OLDS DELTA 88 

Loaded, VB, cass., clean $ 

car 



1995 



'85 PONTIAC FIREBIRD 

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VB, toaded, please hurry .. 



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1 6 cyl., auto., air, stereo, t#.flOE 

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LIBERTYVILLE 



.WAUKEGAN 
BUCKLEY RD. 



LIBERTY BUICK r^,^ 

EAGLE SUBARU xy 






Buick(i) Jeep/Eagle# Subaru ® 



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Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 




ounty 
At A 
Glance 



Village hopes 
for park grant OK 

WADSWORTH— Village officials 
are hopeful the Illinois Department of 
ConscrvatlcHi will look favorably on a re- 
quest for a $189,000 matching grant An 
IDOC representative visited 13-acre site 
surrounding village hall. An IDOC deci- 
sion of whether the plan merits a board 
hearing will be made in October or 
November. 



Former clerk will 
return money, tapes 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— Former 
Village Clerk Donna Langel. 52, has been 
sentenced for stealing more than $15,000 
in village water bill collections last 
November and December. She wiU be on 
probation 30 months, make full restitu- 
tion of $16,454. undergo mental health 
and alcoholic counseling, do 200 hours of 
community service and return tapes of 
secretly-recorded village hall telephone 



conversations. The sentence was negoti- 
ated in the court of Judge John Goshgar- 
ian. If Langel violates any of the condi- 
tions she is subject to six months in jail. 
She pleaded guUty to official misconduct 
for taking more than $50,000 in village 
receipts, most of it in the fcmn of chedcs. 



Boards ponder 
development plans 

GRAYSLAKE— Plans for 667-acres 
of property off of Routes 45, 120 and 137 
are expected to be unveiled before 
Grayslake boards Sept. S.The plan com- 
mission and zoning board of appeals are 
expected to hear plans for land now owned 
by Prairie Holdings, a Lake County based 
coiporation. "The bulk of the land is R-I." 
Grayslake Village Manager Mike Ellis 
said. Two other zones, one of a shoppmg 
center and another for limited industrial, 
are also being sought 



Three generations 
opened new bank 

LIBERTYVILLE— Three genera- 
tions of Wonderllcs and Clonts partici- 
pated in the groundbreaking ceremony 
that officially announced the opening of 
Libertyville Bank. The new bank is a 
branch of the Richmond Bank that the 
two families already own. The bank is 
located across the street from Adlcr Park 
on Milwaukee Avenue and is open for 
business. 



Emergency fund for 
fire victims started 

WAUCONDA— In efforts to help 
the LaPointe family get back on their 
feet, neighbor Bob Schaewe and officers 





Ji 



Joh'L*^' 







SAVE NOW ONI]JiJI^sI^ 



WABRAfffI 



1660 Pro V DLX 

70 HP TNT Johnson OutBoard, 
Sport Package, OMC pfe-rig 
plus 2,000-lb Shoreland'r Trailer. 

^^^°°°' •12,495 




mmmimtmgmmmfmmm' 




16 Pike Rebel 

standard features include: 
Aerated Live Well, Navigation 
Lights, 30 HP Johnson 
Outboard, 1,200-lb 
Shoreland'r Trailer. 

OuHhe-Door ^5 QQS 
Price... ' 



PPdDLXine oi Lund Boats 

PI jpoti^wf If owe 40ftnsqn 






Buy American At . . 



C. HALING & SONS 

Full Service Marina • Parts & Accessories 
'Over 70 Years Of Customer SaUsf action" 



2-1/2 Miles W. Of Rte. 59 

On Grass Lake Rd. 

East Shore Of Grass Lake 

Antloch 



BOAT SLIPS 




(708) 395-2250 

Hours: 

Daily 10 to 5 

Closed Mondays 



LAUNCH RAMP 



on the Williams Park Improvement 
Association have (^ned an Emergency 
fund in the family's name at Wauconda 
National Bank. On Aug. 21, a call was 

put in to the Wauconda Fiie Department 
for a house fire at 28641 N. Main Sl in 
Williams Paik. The fire destroyed the 
entire home and all the possessions 
therein. Another fire occurred at the same 
address about three hours later. Firemen 
suspect the flres were set. The LaPointe 
family, a mother and two girls, were in 
Kentucky on vacation at the time of the 
fires. Neighbors hope that residents will 
donate clothing, money, anything that 
will help the family get back on their 
feeL Neighbor Bob Schaewe can be 
reached at 526-2259 for any information. 



Police file sex 
abuse charges 

GRAYSLAKE— Grayslake Police 
Department is investigating several re- 
ported incidents of aggravated criminal 
sexual abuse as repotted by the victim, a 
male juvenile. The alleged offender, 
Rosemary L. Smith, age 34, of Wild- 
wood, has been charged with three counts 
of aggravated criminal sexual abuse and 
released £rom custody on a $40,000 rec- 
ognizance bond awaiting trial. Conrad 
Gutraj of the Grayslake police dq>artment 
said the incidents came to the depart- 
ment's attention Aug. 24 with charges 
filed the next day. No court dale has been 
set 




Drug-prevention powwow 

MIcW Jones, left, explains a drug-abuse-prevention program to County Board 
Chaimnan Robert Depke during an open house at a new addiction-counseling 
center for western Lake County. Politicians and education oflicials turned 
out last week to show support for the center, part of the Northern Illinois 
Council on Akx)holism and Substance Abuse. NIC ASA will honor its top 
volunteers at a dinner Sept. 15 at Lamb's Fann In Libertyville.— Photo by Bill 
Carey 



ESTATE PLANNING 

SEMINAR 



AVOID PROBATE 

This mforiiiative and eiitei^tainiii^ seminar 

will sho'w you how proper planning can save 

time and thousands of dollars. 

You 7/ learn how to: 

■ Minimize estate taxes with an 

estate plan that includes a 
LIVING TRUST 

■ Reduce estate taxes. 

■ Avoid the lengthy and expensive 

probate process. 

■ Maintain privacy and control of your estate. 

■ Avoid multiple probates if you own property in 
more than one state. 



You should attend this seminar if your estate is in 
excess of $50,000, or you arc married, or you have minor 
children, or you own real estate in more than 1 state. 
Speakers: 




^OLs^ 



£ff 



ZVI POLSTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



ROBERT K. WEGGE 

ACCQONTAIIT 

SpBcializIng in estate planning 



September 16, 1992 

7:30 p.in. 

Hampton Irni 

Gurnce, IL 

(Ju8l Eosl of 194 on Grund Ave.) 



For Informalion & Kcscrvalions Call 

(708) 223-9200 

SEATING LIMITED 
KESERVATION REQUIKED 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 



r 



Lakelands COUNTY NEWS 



Grand Openin gs 



The following is a list 
of new businesses in Lake 
County as registered with 
the Lake County Clerk's 
office: 

CommuDity 
Foundation, located at 
34444.StanIey Rd., 
Ingleside. Permit given to 
Charles L. Joly of 
Ingleside and Charles L. 
Joly of Washington, DC. 

Reddy Teddy Go & 
Company, located at 
221 W. Church St, 
Wauconda, Permit given 
to Terri Kissclburg of 
Wauconda, and Shcrri 
Hunter of Merrill, Wis. 

Terra-Tech Designs, 

located at 1761 Yale Dr., 
Mundelcin. Permit given 
to Jill Thome Ridley of 
Mundelein. 

Do Re Mi 

Kindermusik, located at 
the Gumee Park District, 



4374 Grand Ave,, Gumee. 
Permit given to Robin 
Crawford of Gumee. 

Space Age Ltd., 
Real Property 
Investment 
Consultants, located at 
P.O. Box 944, Lake 
Forest Permit given to 
Stuart Anthony of Lake 
Forest 

Professional Piano 
Tuning, located at 249 
S. Seymour Ave., 
Grayslake. Permit given 
to Kenneth Klabundc of 
Grayslake. 

J & D Services, 
located at 30925 N. 
Fremont Ave., Grayslake. 
Permit given to Jenny M. 
Gollined of Grayslake. 

Leesign, located at 
919 HiUwood Cicle, 
Round Lake Beach > Permit 
given to Lee A. Rumpel 
and Deborah Rumpel of 
Round lake Beach 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 
Public notice is hereby given pursuant to a Petition 
on file in the Village Clerk's office of the Village of Fox 
Lake, that a public hearing will be held on September 
24. 1992 at 7:30 p.m. in the Village Hall, Fox Lake, 
Illinois, to hear the Petition of Graham C. Stores, owner 
of the following described real estate to-wit: 

The South 150 feet, measured on the west line there- 
of of that part of block 6, in f^an/in's subdivision, of part 
of the NE 1/2 of the NE 1/2 of fractional Section 9, 
Township 5 North. Range 9, East of the Third Principle 
meridian, bounded by a line described as follows towit: 
Commencing at the Northwest corner of said Block €; 
thence South along the West line of said Block, 380 
feet; thence East to the Easterly line of said Block; 
thence Northerly along the Easterly line of said Block 6 
to the Northeast corner of said Block 6, and thence 
West to the place of beginning, (except that part taken 
for the road) in Lake County, Illinois. 
Commonly known as; 49 N. Route 12, Fox Lake, Illinois 
The physical location of the property Is; East side of N. 
Route 1 2 South of Oak Street; The common address is 
49 N. Route 12; Petitioner is requesting the following; 
20 Feet rear yard set-back variance. 

Said Petition is available for examination in the 
Village Clerk's office at the Village HatI in Fox Lake, 
Illinois. 

All interested persons are invited to attend said hear- 
ing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GREG MURRAY, Chairman 

Fox Lake Zoning Board of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 21st day of August. 1992 

0992A-0O1-FL 

September 4, 1992 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The North Chicago School DislricI No. 187 will 
accept a Letter of Intent from interested parties to enter 
Into a long-tenn lease for the rental of the property 
described as North School, 1 2th and Adams Street, 
North Chicago, IL 60064. 

Details of the lease-agreement may be obtained 

from: 

Martin T. McConahay, Comptroller 

North Chicago Unit School District 187 

2000 Lewis Avenue 

North Chicago, IL 60064 

(708) 689-6150 

Letters of Intent must be received by Tuesday, 
September 15. 1992 at 4:00 P.M. 

0992A-016-GEN 
September 4, 1992 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 

Publfc notice is hereby given pursuant to a Petition 
on file in the Village Clerk's office of the Village of Fox 
Lake, that a publk: hearing will be held on September 24, 
1992 at 7:30 p.m. in the Village Hall, Fox Lake, Illinois. 
to hear the Petition of Mk^hael & Trudy Hellkss, owner of 
the fdtowing described real estate to-wvt: 

Parcel C: That part of the W1/2 of the fdtowing de- 
scribed premises (taken as a tract) to wit: (That part of 
the E 11.13 chains of the NE1/4 of Sec. 10, T. 45 N.. R. 
9 E. of the 3rd P.M., lying S. of John Tweed's Subdivi- 
sk}n and N. of the S. 593* thereof) described as folkiws: 
commencing at a point 21 15.2' N. of the S. line of said 
quarter Sec. and 1 1 1.9' E. of the W. line of saki W1/2; 
thence E. parallel to the S. line of said quarter Sec. 
111.5"; thence N. parallel with the W. line of said tract, 
346.6' (measures 364.6') to a point on the southerly line 
of John L. Tweed's Subdivision, which is 247' 
Southeasterly from the W. tine of said tract (measured 
along the soulhedy line of said sub.); thence N. 64° 42' 
W. along the Southerly line of sakJ Sub., 123.3'; thence 
S. 417.4', more or less, to the place of beginning, ex- 
cept the S. 1 30,33' thereof, in Lake County, IL. 

pHTcel D: That part of the W1/2 of the following de- 
scribed premises (taken as a tract) to wit: that part of 
the E. 1 1.13 chains of the NE1/4 of Sec. 10, T. 45 N., R. 
9 E. of the 3rti P.M., lying S. of John L. Tweed's Sub. 
and N. of the S. 593' thereof, described as follows; 
commencing at a point 2.1 15.2; N. of the S. line of said 
quarter Sec., and 223.4* E. of the W. line of said tract; 
thence E. parallel with the S. line of said quarter Sec., 
130.6' to the E. line of said W1/2; thence N. along said 
E. line, 303.5' to the southerly line of said John L. 
Tweed's Sub.; thence N. 64" 42' W. along the Southeriy 
line of said Sub., 143.8* to a point 247 SoutheasteHy 
from the W. line of said tract (measured along the 
Southerly line of said Sub.); thence S. 364.6', more or 
less, to the place of beginning, except the S. 111.35' 
thereof, in Lake County. Illinois. 

The physical lodation of the property is: Vacant 
property between Uppincott Road and Tweed on the 
South skie of Uppncott L.ane. i' 

The common address Is: 251 & 257 Llppincolt Lane. 
Petitwner is requesting the following; Rezone from 
R-3 to R-2. 

Said Petitkin is available for examination in the Vil- 
lage Clerk's office at the Village Hall in Fox Lake, Illinois. 
All interested persons are Invited to attend said 
hearing and be heard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GREG MURRAY. Chaimian 

Fox Lake Zoning Boand of Appeals 

Dated at Fox Lake, Illinois 

This 31 St day of August. 1992 

0992A-O20-FL 

September 4, 1992 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 
DESCRIPTION 

1. The Grayslake Community Park District, Grayslake, 
Illinois, hereinafter referred to as the OWNER requests 
sealed proposals for: 

turf seed and fertilizer 
CONTRACT DOCUMENTS 

2. Contract Documents may be obtained on or after 
September 4, 1992 at the office of the OWNER during 



normal office hours. 
BID DUE DATE 

3. Proposals will be received by the OWNER in accor- 
dance with the following; 

Bv hand delivery 

Grayslake Community Park District 

243 Harvey Avenue 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

By mail deliverv 

Grayslake Community Park District 

P.O. Box 708 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

TIME: bids must be received no later than 2:00 pm 

LOCAL TIME, September 18, 1992 

BID OPENING 

4. Proposals will be publicly opened and read aloud 
commencing at 2;00 pm LOCAL TIME, September 18, 
1992. Action on said proposals will be taken by the 
OWNER at a later date, at a regular, adjourned or spe- 
cial meeting of the Park Board. 

LATE BIDS 

5. All proposals received after the hereinafter stipulated 
time and date will be rejected and/or not be accepted 
and will be returned to the Bidder unopened. 
MINORITIES 

6. The OWNER encourages minority business firms to 
submit bids on the approved project. The OWNER also 
encourages the successful bidder to utilize minority 
businesses as sub-contractors for supplies, equipment, 
services and construction. 

BY ORDER OF THE GRAYSLAKE COMMUNITY 
PARK DISTRICT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 

Louise Wickersheim, President 

0992A-002-QEN 

September 4, 1992 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FOR SALE 
The Deep Lake improvement association under its by- 
laws is offering for sale, its second avenue lot at 21888 
W. 2nd avenue, this Is known as lot 18 in block 3, in 
Deep Lake Villa subdivision described as follows: that 
part of the South West quarter of the Northwest quarter 
of section 34. township 46 North, range 10, East of third 
prindpal meridian, lying West of the center of the public 
highway, (except the West 20 rods thereof); according 
to the plat thereof lecorded in book "J" of plats, pages 
62 and 63. Tax description PIN; 02-34-119-018. Sealed 
bids will be accepted by board members until and 
including September 7th, 1992 and must include 10% 
earnest money of bid proposed, balance upon closing, 
minimum bid to be accepted will be $7,500. Those bids 
submitted will be opened by the board at the annual 
meeting, September 13th, 1992, and accepted or 
rejected at that time as per prior majority approval of the 
membership in good standing. 

0892D-982-GEN 

August 28, 1992 

September 4, 1992 



Open Grandparents Day 

Sunday September 13th 

Call Todayl 

Shtnv Them How Mtwh You Care.., 
Send Them A Gift Of Flowers 



Impbrtaxit Dates to Remember! 

Frl.« Oct» 16 - National Boss Day 
Sat., Oct. 17 - Sweetest Day 







Island Lalne Plaza 



(708) 526-5704 ggg 




^■-s-PV'W ---■^, 1^-, 



TO 



1 
1 




1 

1 . 



-M ii- Aj j^ ">%* * « < J" * •* 










ENJOY SUNDAY BRUNCH 



Served 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. 



Under 



Adults '8.95 Children M.50 ia 

•Hot Entrees •Belgium Waffles 

•Entrees for the 'lighter' appetite 

•Ice .Cream Desserts •Fresh Fruit On season) • 

•Omiettes mad© to order 

•Homemade pastries •Varied appetizers Including 

•Smoked Salmon •Salad & Fruit Bar 

•Compllmentary,Glass of Wine 



Entertainment by Cart Rotti 




(815)678-2631 



HlTlCOlimYCLll 

5419KonoihoSf. ^, ijx i Blk.lottOfHt. t7 
Richmond, IL 



Now Open In Liberty ville 

Serving only US,D.A Premium 
Choice Certified Beef 

Charcoal Grilled or 
Gas Broiled. 

Broiled Prime Loin Chops 

Center Cut, served with our delicious 
mini sauce. •'17.95 

Grilled Swordfish Steak 

Our select nine ounce center cut, 
served with Viking butler. •'14.95 

Veal Francoise 

Veal dipped in egg bailer, sautccd In 
butter with mushrooms and lemon. 
•14.95 

1 290 S, Milwaukee • 362-601 6 
All Major Credil Cards Honored 

'OvcrlookinfiUbcnyvilte at nightfrom the tnpofthe 12Q0 liuUdlns" 




/iiji 



4 Lakclond Pl«wspap«fs 



^Restaurant 8c ^anqucts 
Gracious dining in the Wesley Sears Country Estate 

Cashew Lobster Tahiti • » 17.95 

Shrimp Hong Kong • • 17.95 

Cape Cod Seafood Combination • •17.95 

Baked Red Snapper Acapulco • * 17.95 

other menu Items $9.9B to $19.95 Includes: 
Country Squire Lazy Susan Tray, Fresh Spinach 
Salad or Tossed Salad. Potato or Vegetable. ^ 
All Major Credit Cards Honored. ^V'^^r. 
(708) 223-0121 .ffS^f 

'> I'lUC Attire. 'Ml 

Intersection Routes 120 & 45 ^Moderately' 

Grayslake. IL. %I^ 

-Closed Mondays- JL> /^ 



Friday, September 4, 1992 





fli^rif-^.i-- »,. 



?■» ,v ■ 



Apples take center stage 
at Quig's Orchard Cafe 



^iwi 



Everything's coming up ^iples at 
Quig's, 300 S. Rte. 83 in Mundelein. and 
the Orchard Cafe is just the place to sam- 
ple the harvest 

In addition to its usual homemade vit- 
lles for biealdast or lunch, the Qrchaid 
Cafe is featuring epple dishes: pancakes, 
waffles, pies, turnovers and strudel. And, 
theie*s more: caramel apples, cider — and 
yes — apple cider shakes. 

"They're delicious — they're ically re- 
freshing," Marion Quig said of the cider 
shakes. 

Quig's will be open seven days a week 
from Labor Day through Columbus Day 
so fans of the Orchard can pick their own 
or buy pre-picked apples. Paula Reds are 
already available, and the Macintosh sea- 
son just started Sept 3. The rest of the 
season openings include Jonathans (Sept 
17), Red Delicious (Sept 24), Golden 
Delicious and Rome Beauties (Oct 1). 

Pick-your-own apples are 45 cents a 
pound with a 20-pound minimum. The 
orchard is now open from 9 a.m. until 5 
p.m. 

For many folks, it's a family affair and 
a delight for the kids. 

"It's a yearly outing for a lot of people 



— they come from miles and miles 
around," Marion said. 

The Orchard Cafe is qien year-round. 
The breakfast menu offers a wide range of 
omelets and other egg combinaticms, bis- 
cuits and gravy, pancakes, waffles — if 
you want it — Quig's probably has it A 
favorite is the Eggs Benedict- an English 
muffin topped with smoked ham, two 
eggs and a mild chcddar sauce. American 
fries are included. 

The lunch menu features a long list of 
sandwiches served on freshly baked breads 
and rolls, salads, sotq)S and desserts. 

"It's homemade stuff," Marion said. 
"As much as possible is made from 
scratch." 

Quig's is celebrating its 45th anniver- 
sary. The family-owned-and-cqieratcd 
business was started by Bob Quig and his 
modier and Cither, Mildred and Henry. 

The Orchard Cafe is open from 7 a.m. 
until 2:30 p.m. (Sundays from 7:30 a.m. 
until 2:30 p jn.) Drinks and desserts are 
still available aftei^ 2:30 p.m. 

Quig's is'loCrated one-quarter of a mile 
north of Midlothian Road. Call (708) 566- 
4520. 



^■ri Restaunnt 



Vie 



caieT 



Home 



& 



Otf\ce 



FAMILY RESTAURANT 
404 N. Lake St. (Rt. 45) 
Mundelein, IL 

(Next to Walgreens) 

(708) 566-7770 



ri"OFFir«F 

! ANY PASrA !! ANY tAI 

DINNER PIZZA , 

I No) Vald with any Diher offer or specials || Noi Void with any oihoro'ler prspedoh | 

LOnecouponparpofty, ,_ One eotjpon per party , 

Pick UP" Delivery -Dtno In II Pick up* DoWery • Dineln I 

_ _^"*£32;R« _. J 1. &yire«Q-30-Be ^_ _J 




tlVE ENTERTAINMENT 

THIS WEEKEND! 



SniL INN 

OPEN FOR LUNCH & DINNER 

formerly Andres on the Bay 
On Pistakee Lake 

Two outside decks. 

Parking for 20 boats. 

Casual- American And 

Italian Menu 

587-2222 

ALL YOU CAN EAT LUNCH BUFFET COMING SOON 



liiclbrn Jrainily 

l\r^-.tauraut 

Scrviiuj 'Jhcaf^JiKL Luncli & 'JHniicr 
In 'Jliuisi- 'J^iil\i'ni 




CLItc ritpiniiiat 



'Efcj-fattt 'Batiqiict 'J acilitic,-^ 

'Banquets 'Zip to JOO 'People 

/let 'lis tPfati Ooitr 'Jsie.xt 'Party 



^^^^ 




RESTAURANT 
& LOUNGE 



lues. & Thurs. - Cheese & Sausage Pizza 

$3.95 All You Can Eat 

Wednesday - Spaghetti 

$3.95 Atl You Can Eat 

Friday - Baked Haddock $9.50 

Saturday - Jumbo Shrimp onciudessoup &saiad bar) 

$9,95 All You Can Eat 
Call for additional dally special Information. 
•Weddings 'Anniversaries 

•Rehearsal Dinners 'Birthdays 
•Business Meetings •Pafties 

BANQUFT FA nrLTTIES For Un to 150 People 

FOR INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS CALL 336-3166 
720 N, Milwaukee Ave., Gurnee 



vcinacEal 



OPEN 

24 MRS. 

FRI.& 

SAT. 



FAMII/Sr RCST A.URANT 

• BREAKFAST 
•LUNCH 

•DINNER 

SENIOR'S SPECIAL 
• CHILDREN'S MENU 
• FOUNTAIN CREATIONS 




'£m:r-mms^&^ji^i^vk':^. 









■iH^'im-'M 




~ftry^mt^J)-^-z"--'' J^ 



~r~y 



:\ \- 



I I I I I I I I -r- 



t t t t~r- 



DOCKKKS 

PIZZA PASTA SALAD BAI 




-ffl. 



CHICKEN J 
COCKTAILSj 



NOW OPEN 

Conic by boat or car, dock space 

for 25 boats. Outside seating by 

the lake. 



Grand Opening! 

Celebration 



jLookfor 



page ad 



paper\ 



Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials 
Check Out Our Drink Specials 

Wo spociolrzo in Iroicn cocKlnils and soH serve cockl.Tilb 



<>i»i:n r*>i« iMti)!N<:ii 

SIJINI>AY 
*>:00 A.M.-:J:0C> p.m. 



Mon.-Sat. 11-12 a.m. 
Sun. 9 a.m.-12 a.m. 

33 WEST GRAND • ON PISTAKEE LAKE • FOX LAKE. IL 60020 
: 708-973-0033 



Friday, September 4, 1 992 



Lakeland Newspapers S 



Ti! 





ON'T MAKE A 
w 9 =*00<'<> MISTAKE 

If SHai^ RaCKEHBACHi 



'kiM 



T^E Wi&Y! 



FTT m ^^ -Fh 




APR 

IS BACK 




1992 SIO PICKUP 

«Bfe to nib ji". 



TczA^as" 



^ 



tp; 



:h 



1992 SIO BUUER 



*157 (0 «297 



PER 
MO.' 



.^ganr^ 



OViHI rOO VANS AVAIIABU! 



BRAND SSiiW !99Z 
CHEViSOLET VAI! 



Equipped, Windows, Locks, 
Tilt, Cruise. Stk.#2814 



rfOL, 




n > 



*ahj.«>^*v Ui^ U.* ^ ^^^ -ii^^ 






1992 CAPRICE 

«303 >o ^343 



I992CJIVAUERVL 



PER 
MO,* 




1992nUSnEPKI(UP 

$158 /o M97 



PER 

MO.' 





PER 
MO.' 







PER 
MO. 




Lv= 



l992CilMARO 

^199 to «239 



PER 
MO.* 



1992UIMIIIA 

«210 >o $260 



PER 
MO.* 




1992 K-fSBLAZiR 4X4 

*367 to ^407 



PER 
MO. 



OTRACKUI 






PER 
MO,* 



l^^^^Z. 




1992 ASmO VAN 

$241 fo $281 



PER 
MO.- 






l992BnEnA 

^flO,395 

$179 to $219 



PER 
MO.* 



I 



MW — 




1992 SUBURBAN 

St 



$344 (o $384 



PER 
MO.' 



i,1 

J' 



^(.. 



v'* -► '?1 



p^-"'?^ .■' 











wmiiiMSiPmmis 

'88 CELEBRITY EURO.... 
'92 CAPRICE CLASSIC « 

STK. Mo. »MP ~_ 



'90 GEO STORM 

STK. No. l\mt 

'90 CORSICA LT 

STK. No. Mr J PA 



'91 GEO METRO *S9< 



'89 CAVALIER 

STK. No, USaiA 






m^mmm^m 



*:S^-r!?.X^^^v£ 



'90 THUNDERBIRD ^88 50 



•89 S-10 BIZR. 4 X4 SIk. f227 36A ^9?50 



UKB 



, '90 SUBURBAN SILVERADO... w iw 



'88 MAZDA P/U SE5....... ^4995 



iSS5aS533a53C^&S2ri3;^SS'ir?:i5r:^ 



' 92 CAPRICE #3109 m ,995 

'89 CAVALIER. Red ^439 5 



'85 CAPRICE S/ W ^I7S0 

'87 PON T. SUNBIRD ^3 895 



<^m 



'90 HYUNDAI EXCEL... ^4395 ^'90 GEO STORM 



STK. No. ai»7e 



$6995 



'87 SAMURAI CONV.JX. $ 3650 



'92 CAV ALIER R. S. 



flJIVI 

THOiraJUIIM 



'89 COMANCHE P/U $4195 



•87 GRAND NATIO NAL. $10,975 



'89 SUBURBAN 4X4. 



LOAOBD, 



'85 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD.. $6950 



i:iEJiKn^i?.A-sieT5:< 



fl MfCifjjHPg CIAiS 

'86 GMC SAFARI VAN.. $7950 
'88 BRONCO II 4X4 $8975 



'88 SUBURBAN SILVERADO... $12^999 Wk '88 GRAND AM. 



$4975 



ROCKBOTTOMS, 

COME AND Sa 
OVER 20 CARS 



CAR SPECtALS 



'91 PRIZM 4 DRS. 



STO 



'9 CHEV. CUSTOM P/U. 



'92 LUMINA EURO $13 J50 

'92 CAPRICE cussic ^^•'«r $11,495 



'88 BERETTA Red. 



SAVE 










^i^^'^s^Mag^ywa^^ 



'86 C ELEBRITY 4 DR $1650 



'^■^•<^:v:<>W^j^^j^. 



'I ■'< !'■*' 



92 S-10 BLZR. 4X4 4 DR.. $16,450 m '87 CARAVELLE $1975 ^ '90 CAVALIER CPE #22210.. $6495 



'88 ASTRO CON V. VAN... S AVE 



'89 F250 4X4 MONSTER TRUCK.. 



MMT. 



'91 S'10 BLAZER 4x4...! 



'92 LUMINA 4 DR. 



$11,975 



'89 OLDS CALAI S $6995 



86 CENTURY LIMITED. $2995 



'88 SPECTRUM. 



$3650 



'89 BERETTA GT,11495C.. $7695 



' 87 MONTE CAR LO SS. $9995 



92 LUMINA APVStk.i9022A... $13,995 1^ '85 DODGE DIPLOMAT $975 ^ '89 CAVALIER RS. $6995 






i ROCKENBACH i 

I PAYS YOU CASH f 
1 FOR YOUR I 

i VEHICLE I 

& Sell Your Car, Truck b 
m Or Van Ta USU I 



m 



K-^^-^ 

^i?i 



AHTIOCH 



FOILAKE \ t*« 
OI_ \ VILLA 

nOUHOLAKE' 



^GunHEE 






WAUKICAH 
-Tir-»l 



LAME 

lUPlC 



klBERTWILLE 

rMUHOCLEiN 



6 Lakeland N«wqxip«rs 



Friday, Septemb«r 4, 1992 



', '' J -f ■ V- sf T*.' nr -■ »~M < I V -J." •^■'^^ '"5 ' -''-1^ f"rt it: , 



m 



Lakeland Newspapers 



.v**<wfrto«; 




Bus trip 

SlPelcr Council of Catholic Women 
in Antioch have planned a tour of 
Amish Acres in Napponee on Oct 1. 
The bus will leave from the rear of the 
church at 6 a.m. The $45 reservation 
will include round trip bus ride, lunch 
and a buggy tour of the grounds. 
Reservations maybe made by calling 
Yolanda Obermeir at 395-7556 or 
Lucy Allman at 395-1755. 

Reading program 

The Antioch Public Library District 
will have a preschool reading program 
and school-age activity hour starting 
Sept, 30 through Dec. 19. There are 
lots of activities planned for children 
ages 3 to 10. Movies will be shown 
once a month on Saturday at 2 p.m. 
Registration will be taken Sept. 1 
through Sept. 15 or until classes are 
filled. You must register in person and 
you must have a current Antioch 
Library card. A signer will be 
available for hearing impaired children 
who need sign language provided. 
Please call ahead because the library 
needs three weeks notice. For more 
information, call 395-0874. 

New Doctor 

Edward Aberholdcn, M.D. and David 
Herman, M.D. are pleased to announce 
the addition of Guy R. Abcrholden, 
M.D. to the staff at Orchard Medical 
Center in the practice of family 
medicine. For more information, call 
395-3322. 

Craft Faire 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4551 
in Antioch will present its annual 
Christmas Arts and Crafts Faire on 
Oct 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 
Nov.l from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Refreshment, prizes and baked goods 
will be available. For more 
information, call Dorothee Himcr at 
395-6934. 

Hydrant flushing 

The Village of Antioch will be 
flushing fire hydrants between Sept. 1 
and Sept. 30. Flushing will occur 
between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 
p.m. Monday through Friday. Signs 
will be posted in each area before 
flushing begins. It is advised that no 
laundry be done between these hours 
when flushing occurs. It is also 
advised that water be visually tested 
for rust before doing laundry. For 
more information, call 395-1881. 

Army reunion 

The Class 441, from Williams 
Army Air Field, Chandler, Ariz., is 
looking for classmate Russell F. 
Ropenack, who is or was from 
Antioch. A reunion of this class is 
planned for November 1992. Anyone 
having information about Ropenack, 
please write to Paul Shannon, 2228 
N. Sea Island Circle. Lakeland. Fla. 
33809. 




Fairs battle 

As the change of seasons begins to bring cooler cheers as two team dash like the seasons, 
weather, high school football will fill the air with grunts and Thomas Stevens. 



.—Photo by 



St. Peter's welcomes its first Kindergartners 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newqiapera 

As the fall begins to coolithe season's 
weather, St Peter's School i^ feeling the 
warmth that only the excitement and zest 
for life that only a five-year-old can bring. 
The school's first kindergarten class ever 
is now in session at the Antioch school. 

'A kindergarten class is a 
real asset to a school/ 
— Joanne Pinto 

The new kindergarten class, which is 
taught by new St. Peter's teacher Linda 
Esser, who is a St Peter alumna, is part 
of a new program that is designed to 
develc^ a school family association by 
combining activities within the parish^ 
said St Peter's Principal Joanne Pinto. 

"Many of our present students have 
gone to other schools for kindergarten and 
we just felt it was time to offer a full-day 
kindergarten class," said Pinto. "But it 
didn't just happen. There was a lot of 
research that went into beginning our new 
kindergarten class." 

According to Pinto, parents have 
historically wanted a kindergailen class at 
St Peter's. "A kindergarten class is a real 
asset to a school," said Pinto. 

The typical school day for the new 
students begins at 8:40 a.m. where basic 
skills, math and religion aie taught among 
various breaks, snacks, a hot lunch, a nap 
or quiet time, and recess before the kids 
are released to go home in the afternoon. 




New kindergarten teacher Unda Esser, an alumna of St. Peter's School, uses a 
flannel board to teach shapes and counting to the first kindergarten class in St. 
Peter's history. — Photo by Thomas Stevens. 



"Parents who work really need the 
security of knowing where their children 
are while they are at work," said Pinto. 
"This full-day program, which develops 
them both academically and socially, is 
working well so far." 

The proof of how well the program is 
working could be how the rest of the 
school has reacted to the little ones in 
their school. 

"nnie children have just been a joy," said 
Pinto. "The enthusiasm of S-ycar-olds has 
just taken over our school." 



According to Pinto, she is not the only 
one who is pleased. "One parent, who has 
a boy and a girl in the kindergarten class, 

said thai their children are so happy to be 
in the kindergarten class. They are very 
happy." ' 

What really helps the whole school 
work, which is part of the Chicago Arch 
Diocese School system, according to 
Pinto, is that St. Peter's students are 
treated like they are family. 

"We are all family," said Pinto. 



ACHS announces changes to NHS selection 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The process (or selection of students to 
the Antioch Community High School 
chapter of the National Honor Society has 
changed for the 1992-93 school year. 

Junior and senicx' students who have a 
4.0 or t>etter cumulative grade point 



Lal<eland Newspapers 



Lakeland (usps 027-08O} 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Onie* o( Publication: 30 South Whhnoy St., Grayslake. IL 
80030. Phone (70B) 223-8161. 

PubDahad WMkly, locond dass p«taga paid id Grayslake, 
1160030. 

Mall Subscflptlon Roios: M6.50 Per Year by Mall paid In ad- 
vonoo In Lahs, Cook Kartosha and McHenry Countlw; elsa* 
whore *22.00 Per Year by Mali paid In odvanco. 

PoMmaatec Send addrns changes to Antk>ch News- 
Heponer, 30 South Whitney Street. P.O. Box MB. Grays- 
lake, llllnoli 60030. 



(708)223-8161 



Antioch Hews-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Uke Villa Record 
Mundelein News 
Grayslake Times 



Vernon Hills News 
Round Lake News 
Wauconda Leader 
LIbertyvllleNews 
LIndenhurst News 



Fox Lake Press North Chicago Tribune 

Gumee Press Warren-Newport Press 

M.R. SCHROEDER 

FountloM904-19a6 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publbher/Pmsldant 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Genera} Manager 

JLLDoPASQUALE DANIEIIL BECKER ANKM. ROBERTS 
JO DAVIS SHARON ZASADIL EUZABETH EBEHT 



involved for a longer period of time. 

"We plan to have the members work on 
service projects which will benefit the 
school and the community," said SchmitL 

"The current NHS members and those 
selected this fall will play a large part in 
defming how the group will accomplish 
that goat" 

The NHS faculty council, a committee 
appointed by Principal Michael 
Radakovich, is overseeing the selection 
process. Letter have been mailed to 
prospective candidates' parents and a 
meeting to receive instructions regarding 
the application process will occur on 
Sept 10. 



average will be considered for selection 
this fall. Induction into the society will 
be in November. 

"Membership in National Honor 
Society is an honor bestowed upon 
students who excel in not only 
scholarship, but also leadership, service 
and character," said NHS Advisor Sue 
Schmitt. 

In addition to the change in the 
selection process, plans arc in the works 
to make ACHS-NHS an active 
organization on the campus. Electing 

students at the beginning of their junior or 
senior year, instead of in the fall as in 
years past, will enable students to be 



Antioch resident receives award 



Antioch resident John Fliester received 
the Lybrand Bronze Medal for his article 
in Management Accounting from the 
Institute of Management Accountants. 



Fliestcr's article, "PPG's Journey to 
ISO 9000", describes how PPG became 
ISO certifted which is critical to become a 
world class supplier. 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 7 



II; 



[11 



m 






Antioch resident elected 
president of local chapter 




Lorrie Lesza-Kowalczyk 



Relief 



An Antioch resident has been elected 
president of the local chapter of a major 
telecommunications organization. 

Lorrie Lcsza-Kowalczyk,an Illinois Bell 
employee, has been elected the 1992-93 
president of the Lakeland Council of 
Theodore N. Vail Suburban Chapter of the 
Telephone Pioneers of America. 

The Telephone Pioneers of America is 
the largest voluntary association on 
industrial employees and has over 810,000 
members. 

Last year, the Telephone Pioneers 
generated almost 29 million hours of 
community service and environmental 
work. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
who needs them. 

"We just couldn't watch the news and 
not do something about what is going on 
down there," said Banike. 

According to Banike, the Red Cross 
requests canned non-perishable food items, 
bottled water, clothing items, and hygiene 
and toUetry items. 

"They are also requesting non-power 
hand tools like screwdrivers and 



hammers," said Cbeny. 

All donations to the Antioch office will 
be turned over to the Red Cross for proper 
distribution. 

"We just wanted to do something for 
those people," said Cherry. 

Keith Johnson Realty World is located 
at 508 North Ave. and is accepting 
donated items from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., 
Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. 




Talented 

The Antioch Community High School Pom Pon squad received a first place 
for one of two routines performed at the Badgerette Pom Pon Camp last 
month. The squad's "street dance" routine received the first place honor for 
the second year In a row. The Sequoils have qualified for the Midwest 
Badgerette State Competition in Schaumburg. Pictured from left to right, first 
row: Julie Glidden, Jennifer Kolb, Lisa Albert, Amanda Wilson, and Carrie 
HoItK). Second Rovyr: Elizabeth Sobczak, NikI DeFer, Amy Holbo, Helen 
Exarhakos, and Jamie Gaaa. Not pictured are Nicole Hanchaen, Jamie 
Prorock, Jamie Crank, Heather Bradley, and Becca Mazzura.— Photo by 
Thomas Stevens. 




Special guests 



The Antioch Rotary Club welcomed some special guests to its Aug. 27 
meeting. Rotary International District Governor Dick Beals (center) addressed 
the Antioch club and spoke on goals for the Rotary. Pictured with Beals, from 
left to right, are: Antioch Youth Exchange Officer Rick Kuehn, Brazilian 
exchange student Andrela Garcia, Denmark exchange student Thomas 
Kjaerdgaard, and Antioch Rotary Club President Ralph Antonelli.— Photo by 
Thonrtas Stevens. 




Last game 

Several area residents enjoyed themselves before the last game of the 
Kenosha Twins at Simmons Field. The club is moving to a new multi-million 
dollar stadium in Ft. Wayne, ind. next season. — Photo by Steve Peterson. 



Teachers 

(Continued from Page 1) 
supervision time. "The increase reflects 
that we are asking them to do more 
woric." 

Schley added that the teachers' union and 
the school board agreed that the standard of 
living index, the amount salaries must be 
increase to keep up with inflation, rose 
between 2.9 and 3.1 percent 

"We have doubled the staffs supervision 
time from one semester to all year," said 
Schley. This supervision would include 
all areas where student need supervision, 
like hallways, studyhall and the library. 

In addition to increased supervision 
time, the teacher will be asked to pay 
more for their health insurance and a two- 
year early retirement incentive plan has 
been implemented by the ratification of 
this contract. 

The contract agreement has increased the 
teachers deductible on their health 
insurance from $200 to $250. "This just 
means that it will cost them an additional 
$50 before their coverage starts," said 
Schley. 



The only language change from the 
previous contract was on the issue of early 
retirement The new agreement will give 
teachers the incentive to retire within two 
years after reaching retirement age. 

"We will boost their salary 20 percent if 
they retire the first year they are eligible 
or 12 percent the second year after they 
have rrau^hed retirement age as incentive to 
retire," said Schley. "If they wait until the 
third year to retire, they will not get a 
bonus." 

The early retirement program will 
enable the district to replace retiring 
teachers with new teachers, creating 
upward mobility within the school. 

The only six -week negotiation process 
and concessions oii both sides proved to 
Schley the willingness of both sides to 
get the job done before school started on 
Aug. 25. This was a goal Schley had 
when he took over as Superintendent of 
District 117 on July 1. 

"Both sides worked hard lo get this done 
in a reasonable amount of time," said 
Schley. "I'm not surprised that it got done 
before the start of school. 



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. .:• VUdRMilum'AVMtSTFJ Kfd '• 



The Lizzard gives visitors a warm Antioch welcome 



I 



by Liz Schmehl 

(708)395-5380 
Welcome 

I would like to extend a 
warm Antioch welcome to 
Esther and Cliff Bergstrom 
who will be visiting our 
area from Tucson, Ariz, 
during the week of Sept. 4. 
Esther and Cliff were 
originally from Arlington 
Heights and Fox l^ake and 
have lived in Arizona for 
approximately nine years 
now. They usually come to 
town on a yearly basis to 
visit their family and 
friends. This time their 
visit is going to be made 
even more special with a 
huge surprise bklhday party 
planned for Cliff by his 
adult children. The party 
will be held at his daughter 
Lori's beautiful home in 
Mc Henry. Cliffs bu^thday 
is Sept. 5 and he will be 
blankity, blank years 
young. 

Also very excited over 
the arrival of the 
Bergs Iroms are their son 
and daughter-in-law, 
Antioch residents, Steve 
and Mary Turner and their 
three special grandchildren 
Andy, Kaite and Matthew 
Turner. So, Bergsiroms, 
welcome to Antioch. 
Happy birthday. Cliff and 
enjoy reading this in 



"Hometown Goodies" when 
Maiy and Steve present it 
to you as part of your 
special birthday celebration. 
Quick service 

We recently had a slight 
gas leak in the natural gas 
line leading to our house. 
We called the Northern 
Illinois Gas Company and 
informed them of the 
problem. They were on the 
scene in less than thirty 
minutes. A nice gentleman 
used various mechanical 
devices to determine where 
the leak was and then called 
in his findings to the 
company. 

Again within thirty 
minutes the repair crew was 
on the scene. They 
determined where the line 
ran from the outside 
service, under the road and 
across the lawn. They then 
marked it with bright paint, 
dug a small hole near the 
road and another even 
smaller hole near the house. 
They pulled out the 
damaged line, put in the 
new one, raised the existing 
meter, repainted it and 
neatly refilled the two small 
holes. Not only were they 
prompt and efficient they 
were also thorough in their 
attempts to put things back 
as they found them. I want 
to commend Northern 
Illinois Gas on their 



prompt, efficient and neat 

service. 

Real life hero 

Daddy, Ed Harrison, 
promised his seven year old 
daughter and six year old 
son a campfire one evening 
in August. When the sun 
began to go down they all 



didn't put it out, Brittany 
ran inside to tell mom to 
call "The Lizard" and let her 
know how her father was 
able to keep the fire going 
even in the rain. Brittany 
was convinced, even more 
than ever, that dad was 
special and wanted everyone 



Hometown Goodies 



went outside to begin their 
special family adventure. 
They piled the wood just 
so, gathered their chairs 
around and started the fire. 
A short while after the fire 
was glowing brightly, 
mother nature decided to 
rain "on their parade!" 
However, this didn't stop 
Ed, Blake and Brittany, as 
they were determined to 
continue enjoying the day- 
long anticipated campfire. 
They merely rounded up 
three unbrcllas and went 
back outside to enjoy the 
beauty and warmth of the 
fire. Luckily Ed had it 
going so well it even 
survived under natures 
sprinkling can. 

As they sat around 
enjoying father/children 
conversation, Ed explained 
he had a magic way to keep 
the fire burning in the rain. 
When the persistant rain 



Police Beat 



. Pefsons chorgod with a crime ore InnocenI unlil proven guilty in a court of law 



ANTIOCH 
Battery 

Antioch Police arrested 

and a charged an Antioch 

man with battery, criminal 

damage to property, and on 

an active warrant after a 

fight broke out at the 

Antioch Bowl on Aug. 26. 

According to police 

reports, Bruce K. Jcffers, 

32, 81 Maude Noa, Fox 

Lake, was arrested after an 

altercation broke out at the 

bowling alley with one of 

the managers of a business 

located inside the alley. 

While police escorted 

Jeffers to the Antioch 

Police Department, Jeffers 

allegedly kicked the door 

window several times, 

causing damage to the car. 

Jeffers was also wanted on 

parole violation charges in 

California. 

Cannabis possessioD 

Antioch Police arrested 
and charged a Antioch man 
with Speeding, driving on a 
suspended license and 
possession of cannabis after 
police stopped the man for 
speeding on Aug. 25. 

According to police 
reports, Robert J. Marshall, 
23, of 155 Ridge Ave. 
Crystal Lake, was slopped 
for speeding after police 
allegedly clocked him 
traveling 83 m.p.h. in a 
posted 45 m.p.h. speed 
zone. Police found that his 
license was suspended and 
two bags of caiuiabis where 
found in his car after a brief 
search. 

LAKEVILLA 

D.W.L.S. 

Lake Villa Police 



arrested and charged a Lake 
Villa man with driving on 
a suspended license and 
operation of a motor 
vehicle without insurance 
after police spotted him 
driving, while knowing 
that he had a suspended 
license (Hi Aug. 27 

According to police 
reports, Roger D. 
Goodwin, 23, of 103 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., was 
stopped by police who 
knew he had a suspended 
license. 
Armed robbery 

Lake Villa Police are 
still looking for an 
unidentified man who 
robbed a gas station on 
July 8, armed with a 
baseball bau 

According to police 
reports, a white male, in 
his middle 20's. six feet tall 
and about 150 pounds. 
Witnesses said that the man 
entered Stan's 66 on 400 
E.Grand Ave. dressed in a 
black shirt and shorts, 
white tennis shoes and a 
white shirt covering his 
face and head. Police said 
the man made off with 
$716 in cash from the 
station. An investigation 
into the matter is ongoing. 



LINDENHURST 
Suspended D.L. 

Lindenhurst Police 
arrested and charged a Lake 
Villa woman man on Aug. 
27 with speeding and 
driving on a suspended 
license after police slopped 
her for speeding. 

According to police 
reports, Stacey L, Keller, 
17, of 300 McKinley. Lake 
Villa, allegedly was 
traveling 49 m.p.h. in a 35 
m.p.h. ^}eed zone. Later it 
was discovered that she had 
a su^iended drivers license. 

DUI / Cannabis Poss. 
Lindenhurst Police 
anested and charged a 
Lindenhurst man on Aug. 
29 with driving under the 
influence, improper lane 
usage, and possession of 
cannabis after police 
stopped him for driving in 
the middle of the roadway. 

According to police 
reports, Timothy S. 
Washburn, 37, of 39852 N. 
Beck Rd., was driving in 
the center of the roadway 
when police pulled him 
over. Washburn refused to 
take a blood alcohol test 
after allegedly failing the 
field sobriety tests. 



to know of his special fire 
building feat. Eventually 
the rain did put out tbe fire, 
but not until the children 
had their fill and retired for 
the evening. 

Blake and Brit^ny will 
never forget the night when 
dad kept the fire going by 
magic. They will have a 
wonderful story to tell their 
own children in years to 
come. He promised them a 
fire and like their own 
special real life hero he 
came through, even with 
mother nature against him! 
Just one more example of 
how little it takes to make 
children happy. 

Overloaded 

In a recent column I 
told you that Dee and Joe 
Samson became grand- 
parents for the first lime on 
August 6. They are quickly 
discovering that there is 
very little that grandparents 



won't do for their little 
grandbabies. I had purchased 
a dressing table for our 
little Alyssa and we ended 
up not needing it. I told 
Dee if Suzy didn't have one 
for Katie she was welcome 
to it. Dee checked with 
mom and dad and was given 
the green light to bring it 
along when they visited. 

They arrived at my 
home in a mid-size car. No 
matter how we twisted and 
turned the table we could 
not get it in the back seat 
and the trunk was even less 
roomy than that. 

Eventually Dee figured 
out how to partially 
disassemble it and then fit 
three quarters of it nicely 
into the back seat. I 
suggested they take the last 
section on their next visit. 
However, Dee was 
determined that little Katie 
would be changed on the 
table Uiat day. She sat in 
the front seat holding the 
huge cube on her lap and 
propped a library book up 
between her and the cube to 
read on the road. They drove 
merrily on their way with 
Dee crunched in the 
passanger seat as 
hubby/grandpa Joe begari 
the long drive to Cicero. It 
had to be a long fifty miles, 
but they made it just in 



time for Katie's diaper 
change. ' 

Happy birthday 

So now the little ones 
and bigger ones have 
returned to school to 
advance further widi their 
education. Due to the rain 
and cold weather the 
summer seemed to slip by 
even faster than normal. 
Maybe our brief summer 
will mean we will have an 
extended Indian Summer, a 
mild winter and an early 
spring — one can always 
hope. 

As is tradition with 
"Hometown Goodies," a 
new month brings with it a 
new birthday list Happy 
September birthday to — 
Wendy Charvat, Tara 
Christopolus, Becky 
Clarke, Amy Dembinski, 
Carrie Dunfrund, Laura 
Edelman, Irene Falcone, 
Nick Falcone, Sandy Forst, 
Neil Hansen, David 
Izenstark Danny Jorudd, 
Jessica Lehmann, Lauren 
Lichter, Bradley Lindstrom, 
Wayne Olsen Sr., Marian 
Rohde, Bob Schmehl, Phil 
Smerz, Lorraine Smiles, 
Eileen Stann, Howard 
Stann, Nicholas Staten, 
Amy Terry, Kaite Turner, 
Al Vandrush, Rene6 
Vaughan, Sandy Wcbel and 
yours truly. 



Lakeland Classifieds 

Get the Job Done! 
Call (708^223-81 61 



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Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 9 






ii 



Antioch has tough Jbattle to reach ^laxpflfeagfiin 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 
Yes indeed sportsfans, it 
is here again. The 
beginning of school 
represents the beginning of 
the high school football 
season and the Antioch 
Community High School 
Sequoits arc ready to make a 
run at another playoff 
f^ipearence. 

With the success of last 
year's squad, which had a 6- 
3 regular-season record and 
earned a berth in the Class 
SA state playoffs. Head 



Coach Del Pechauer hopes 
(his year's team has gained 
some experience from last 
year's playoff appearence. 

"The seniors, we have 
now, have learned from the 
playoff exposure we had last 
year," said Pechauer. "We 
will try to get back (to the 
playoffs)." 

But that maybe easier said 
than done. With the loss of 
Antioch standouts Tim and 
Tom Lehn to graduation, 
and stronger competition 
within the North Suburban 
Conference, the Sequoits 



have their wodc cut out for 
them when they travel to 
Libertyville Saturday, SepL 
5 for the season opener. 

"We will be a middle of 
the pack team up this year," 
said Pechauer. "But, you 
never know what will 
happen until the season 
starts." 

Not knowing is exactly 
what Pechauer means when 
he talks about this year's 
team, which will have 
several question marks at 
key positions when the 



season begms. quarterback qiiestion. 

For openers, the team is Pechauer is still looking for 

still searching for a starting a leader oil the defensive 



quarterback to lead the 
Sequoit offense. Leadership 
could come from Senior 
Eric Newcomb if he wins 



side of the football. 

"We are looking for a 
leader to step up and lake 
charge," said Pechauer. 
the job. If not, then Junior "Things arc looking better 
Casey Q'Connell will, call on defense." 
the plays for Antioch. < 

Other offensive This leadership could 

contibuters. according to come from cornerback 
Pechauer, will be running Janke, or senior linebacker 
backs Rick Leiikhardt. a Dave Remter. "The defense 
junior, and Larry Janke, a has gotten better as camp 
scniOT. ' has progressed," said 

In addition to the Pechauer. '*We had to call 



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■^■:':''}:yr''^':::.-,ffffr:'i 



1992 ACHS Varsity Football team 

ACHS Head Coach Del Pechauer tooks forward to an exciting season of Sequoit 
football this season. — Photo by Tlxjnws Stevens. 







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PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING . 
REGARDING ANNEXATION 
VILLAGE BOARD Of TRUSTEES 
VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 
RLE NO: PC 92^; ZBA 92-6 (7-46-10) 
DATE: Monday, September 21, 1992 
TIME: 7:00 P.M. 

PLACE: Board Floom. Village Hall 
874 Main Street 
Antioch. IL 60002 
(708)395-1000 
PETITIONER: John Green 

111 Gladys Ave. 
Fox River Grove, IL 60021 
(708)639-2140 
PETmONER'S REQUEST: Pefa'tioner Is requesting 
Annexation of Parcel 1 and Parcel 2, described below, 
along with Zoning of R-2 with a Planned Unit 
Development, pending Annexation, in substantia) con- 
formance to the Concept Plan dated 7/6/92, propared 
by Donald Manhaid Assoctales, Inc. and made a part of 
the petition. (The total project site also includes Parcel 3 
which is currency wittiin the Corporate Limits of the 
Village of Antioch and is identified on the Lake County 
Tax Maps as Permanent Index Number 02-07-201- 
001). 

PROPERTY IN QUESTION: The area proposed to 
be Annexed consists of approximately 70.61 Acres as 
depicted on the proposed Plat of Annexation dated 
7/8/92 and prepared by Donald Manhard Associates, 
and is legally described as foUows: 

PARCEL 1: THE EAST HALF OF THE WEST HALF 
OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, 
TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH. FIANGE 10, EAST OF THE 
THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN . (EXCEPT THERE- 
FROM THAT PART CONVEYED BY ROSE TURNER, 
A WIDOW, TO BENJAMIN BURKE AND OLLIE 
BURKE. BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 30, 1929 AND 
RECORDED JUNE 5, 1930 AS DOCUMENT 354770 IN 
BOOK 354 OF DEEDS PAGE 582), IN LAKE COUNTY. 
ILUNOIS. (P.I.N. 02-O7-20&O02) 

PARCEL 2: THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST 
QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH. 
RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERID- 
IAN, {EXCEPT THEREFROM THE EAST THIRD 
THEREOF), IN LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS. (P.I.N. 02- 
07-200007) 

TOGETHER WITH ALL OF NORTH AVENUE AND 
TIFFANY ROAD (EXCEPT THAT PART OF TIFFANY 
ROAD PREVIOUSLY ANNEXED) RIGHT-OF-WAY 
LYING WITHIN OR ALONG AND ADJOINING ALL OF 
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY WITHIN THE 
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 
46 NORTH RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI- 
PAL MERIDIAN IN UKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS. 

PROPERTY OWNERS: Herman, Heiberger and 
Herman, an Illinois Gerteral Partnership 

All persons desinng lo appear and be heard thereon 
for or against said petition may appear at said Hearing 
flnd bo hoflrd 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH, BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Candi L Olsen, Village Cleric 

0992A-O0e-AR 

September 4, 1992 



off the dogs during one 
practice last week. We are 
leady to play." 

Overall though, Pechauer 
expects his team to be 
competitive despite his 
team's question maiks and 
tough schedule, which 
includes battles with Lake 
Forest, Warren, and Zion- 
Benton. 

"It is going to be an 
exciting year for Antioch," 
said Pechauer. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

COUNTY ZONING 
NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
«2907 

COUNTY OF LAKE 
TO WHOM IT MAY 
CONCERN: 

PUBUC NOTICE Is 
hereby given to all per- 
sons in the town of 
Antioch, Lake County 
Illinois, that a public 
hearing wilt be held on 
Thursday, September 
24, 1992, at 1:30 p.m., 
in the Antioch Township 
Hall. 99 Highway 173, 
Antioch. IL 60002, rela- 
tive to a request to vary 
the terms of the Lake 
County Zoning 

Ordinance. Chapter 
One, Section 5300, to 
reduce the required 
sideyard setback from 
thirty (30) feet to 12.5 
feet at the front end of 
the building addition, 
and from thirty (30) feet 
to 15.5 feet at the rear 
end of tfie building addi- 
tion. The property is 
legally described as fol- 
Iowb: 

Lot 1 In Opatz 
Subdivision, being a 
Subdivision of part of 
the North West 1/4 of 
the North East 1/4 of 
Section 35, Township 
46 North, Rwige 9. East 
of the Third Principal 
Meridian, according to 
the Plat recorded 
February 10, 1970 as 
Document 1450710, in 
Book 49 of Plats, page 
20, in Lake County, 
Illinois. 

The subject property 
is located on the east 
side of Drexel 
Boulevard, approxi- 
mately midway between 
the Intersection of 
Drexel Boulevard and 
Lotus Avenue, and con- 
tains approximately 
166,250 square feet. 

As a result of the 
petition of JAMES E. 
5CHERER (record 
owner), 38931 Drexel 
Blvd.. Antioch, IL 
60002. which petition is 
on file and available for 
examination in the 
office of the Lake 
County,Zoning Board of 
Appeals, County 
AdministratkMi BuiMing, 
18 N. County St., 
Waukegan. IL 60085. 
All interested persons 
are Invited to attend 
said hearing and be 
heard. 

LAKE COUNTY 
ZONING BOARD OF 
APPEALS 
CLAYTON LCHRISTENSEN 
Chairman 
For this hearing, rea- 
sonable accommoda- 
tion wilt be made for 
handicapped persons. 
This includes accom- 
modation for the vision 
and hearing impaired if 
a request Is made with- 
in 48 hours of the meet- 
ing time. 

Dated at Waukegan, 
Illinois, tills 24tii day of 
August 1992i 

0992A-007-AR 
September 4, 1992 



10 Uakoland N«wspap»rs 



Friday, S«pl«mt>«r4, 1992 



..•■siar^jSg : 



Cut their pay 

Antioch School District 117 has stated that they now 
have run up a debt of over $600,000 and arc going lo 
seek another referendum along with various fees lo 
make up this deHcit This $600,000 shortage is in the 
education fund, where 70 percent is devoted to teacher- 
administrator salaries and benefits. How about some 
Sleep pay cuts from these people before turning to the 
overtaxed public again. 

Postal non-service 

First, a compliment to this part of your newspqjcr. I'm 
calling in reference to the postal non-service someone 
wrote about in your column. I live in Round I^e 
Beach and can't complain about our mall delivery, but 
about getting that letter that goes from one point to 
another. I have written to the head of the postal service 
many times in regard to this. Since when does it take a 
week for a letter to be delivered from Chicago? Would 



I^IPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



GET "IT" OFF YOUR CHEST (708)223-8073 



Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no 
claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland 
Newspapers does not claim the content or the subject 
matter as fact, but as the personal opinion of the caller. 
Lakeland reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain from 
printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your 
message 24 hours a day. Although the call is anonymous, 
please leave your village name. 

Grocery store monopoly 

I'm calling about the new commercial center at Grand 
Avenue and Hunt Club Road in Warren Township. 
Gumee residents please attend those public hearings. 
One concern is speculation that they are negotiating a 
supermarket (either Jewel or Dominick's) in the 
development, but no store has been named as yet. 
Befofe Jewel decided to open a new store in Waukegan 
at Green Bay Road, their proposal to open in Gumee 
was refused. There is a local grocery store monopoly in 
Gumee. We do not need another supermarket in Gumee 
with a local name. Negotiations work smoothly in 
Gumee because you have a village administrator that is 
a brother-in-law lo the mayor. I would like to see a big- 
name supermarket in Gumee, not a local-store 
monopoly. Also, the population growth in Gumee 
warrants additional liquor licenses to be granted. Do we 
know who our liquor commissioners are in Gumee and 
also Wairen Township and Lake County? Check it out. 

Read our lips 

The Libertyville High School Administration is a 
bunch of sick, sore losers. Just because the voters 
defeated so soundly their tax increase, they have now 
dumped their mobile classrooms right on Route 176 
right by the Brainerd Building where they are an eyesore 
to the community. These same buildings could have 
been over on the Lake campus where everybody would 
not have had to look at them all day long. I suggest 
that the Libertyville High School administration read 
our lips: "There ain't going to be any more school 
taxes." Cut out the service; kick the druggies out of 
a;hooI. Let's quit letting these kids sell dope and getting 
themselves pregnant. Instead, let's cut the frills out of 
education, and let's reduce taxes. There is no need for a 
lot of the classes they are holding over there in order to 
give these an adequate education to go on to college. 
Let's start classes an hour earlier and run an hour later. 
Let's run classes eleven months a year instead of nine- 
then youll have all kinds of room in that high school. 
And, maybe while you arc at it, get rid of a couple of 
the administrators and their $60,000 paychecks, as well. 

Winning dancers 

I'm callmg to say "Congratulations" to the sophisticated 
ladies from the Dance Connection in Grayslake. They 
recently took a fourth place with their dance routine at 
the Lake County Fair, and they also just took first place 
at the Kenosha Fair. I applaud them for their hard work 
and their efforts. 

Build a new school 

I think that it is time that Lindenhurst and Lake Villa 
get their own high school. The reason being that 
Antioch wants to have a new high school, and all the 
Antioch residents would be taxed for this new school. I 
think that Antioch High School is big enough for all of 
the students that live in Antioch. It's time for 
Lindenhurst, since it's the subdivision city of the world, 
and Lake Villa to come up with their own high school 
and build it somewhere else, I think it would be a much 
better idea, and then the Lindenhurst and Lake Villa 
taxpayers could pay for it themselves. 



Clean up our fests 

Hi, I'm from Round Lake. Today I was on my way 
home, in a hurry, and was stopped for a half hoiu" on 83 
and Center Street in Grayslake because of the parade. 
Why can't they start that parade i^sl 83? The traffic was 
backed up so far it was terrible. Then, tonight we went 
to the Grayslake Fesl-what a terrible place for kids. 
Grayslake, clean up your act! Get some family 
entertainment. All we saw was a bunch of drunken, old, 
middle-aged men smoking and swearing and no lighting; 
it was a terrible time. These fests have got to be cleaned 
up. We want lo have a nice, family aunospherc where 
there is no swearing, no icky people hanging around. 
Don't serve liquor at these fests. Wise up, you guys. 
We've got children that are going to be the future. 
We've got to be examples to them. We don't need any 
more drunken, middle-aged people hanging around^ 




you believe one time I received a card a year after it was 
mailed, and it only came from twenty minutes away. 
What happened to this wonderful automated service that 
was supposed to eliminaie a lot of problems and make 
our postal system better? Now I hear that fuU-time 
workers will be laid off and pan-time workers put on. 
What will happen to the postal service, as bad as it has 
already become? P.S. The Lake County museums and 
preserves are great places to spend some time. Not 
enough people know of the beautiful preserves we have 
in the Lake County area. The museum is a nice place to 
see the history of our area. 

Don't annex 

Why is Fox Lake annexing properties outside of Lake 
County? We don't need them. Those people are never 
counted in the census. They don't know which way to 
vote, and now it will raise our taxes because we are 
(Continued on page 26) 




BE PREPARED. 




BE VERY PREPARED. 



A first aid kit can be invaluable for treating 
minor health problems around the house. 

But when your problems go beyond 
bandages and aspirin, call on the registered 
nurses at ASK-A-NURSE', 

With iheir many years of training and 
sophisticated medical information system, 
they are uniquely qualified to assess your 



symptoms and help you determine what you 
snould do next.. .whether it's seeing a doctor 
or going to an emergency room 

ASK-A-NURSE is free and 
available 24 hours a day. 

So keep our number by 
the phone and then consider ^ 
yourself ver>' prepared. (708) 244-5900 




ASK*A*NUR5E 



Your Source For ,^ 
Hciilih Care Answers 




Provided as a free communiiy ser\'ice by: 



Saint Therese Medical Center 



A Division ol rraiuiscan Siskis 
llciillli Cart Coqtorailan 



O I*** Urlorjl "siMrort C«i«i|i, tni. A«.K'"A-NL"IL">I; K tttft'ttxi irjJciiuil. ti VxUni\ hMrmi Omup. Im . 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lak^nd Newspapers 11 












Lakeland's EDITORIAL 



« 



'■;: 



I 



New union leadership 



As our nation prepares to observe 
another Labor Day, it is interesting to 
note that new leadership is entrenched in 
the labor movement, supplanting such 
historic leaders as the miners who were in 
the forefront in the 1930s, the railroaders 
during the 1940s and auto workers during 
the 50s and 60s. 

Today, teachers are unionism's elite, 
unchallenged for organization, militancy 
and political power. In less than four 
decades, teachers have embraced traditional 
labor unionism while vaulting from 
decidedly lower pay lo the top of public 
sector salaries, eclipsing nurses, police 
officers and rircfightcre. 
Even as the union mantle of leadership is 
passed from one occupational field to 
another, indicators are surfacing that 
forecast a threat to leadership. Bluntly 
put, teachers may be pricing themselves 



out of the market 

There is evidence that school districts in 
Lake County, some of them possessing 
among the highest paid primary and 
secondary teachers in the nation, are 
replacing experienced, highly compensated 
teachers with inexperienced teachers who 
can be paid lower salaries that fit the 
budgets school boards are able to pay in 
the face of declining state aid and 
increasing taxpayer hostility. And they 
arc doing this legally. 

Does the leadership of the American 
Education Assn. and the American 
Federation of Teachers recognize what is 
happening? Do they appreciate the threat 
to liheir standing? American history is 
replete with union leaders who either 
ignored signs in the market place or woke 
up too late. 



Saturation patrols work 



There is closc-at-hand evidence that 
saturation police pauolling still is a key 
component lo coping with criminal 
activity. Law enforcement officers know 
the role of saturation patrols, but the 
concept for keeping llic peace sometimes 
is lost on budget-cutting politicians and 
members of the public. 

Zion recently took the opportunity of 
having five new paU'olmen returning from 
academy training to beef up regular 
personnel in an effort to focus on a high 
crime aparuncnt area known for drug 
dealing and unruly youth. 

In two weeks of non-stop patrolling, 



citizens experienced a noticeable drop in 
drug dealing, general rowdincss and gun 
shots. 

Saturation patrolling and the manpower 
it exerts on unlawful behavior isn't the 
only answer to fighting crime, but it's 
certainly a starting point as the Zion 
experience reaffirmed. Other 
communities may not have the crime 
problem of Zion, but the lesson of 
saturation paU-ols should not be lost when 
law breaking reaches a point where 
regular measures fall short of providing 
adequate public protection. 



Watch the Big Apple 



Lake County officialdom charged with 
solid waste disposal would do well to 
follow the progress of an Illinois 
company's job of developing New York 
City's first modem solid waste incinerator. 

Wheelabrator Technologies has been 
awarded a contract to build a $450 million 
trash-lo-cncrgy incinerator and recycling 
facility which will bum an estimated 300 
tons of waste per day. Consuaiclion will 
begin in 1996. The plant is targeted to go 
on-line in 1999. 

Despite cries about air pollution, 
incineration hasn't been written off here, 
but burning as an option to process solid 
waste definitely has taken a back seat to 



stepped up recycling efforts and reliance 
on landfills in local deliberations. That's 
too bad because modern incineration 
technology all but has eliminated air 
pollution hazards. 

Now there is someone else to "break 
trail." Skeptics undoubtedly will say that 
New York City's air already is as bad as it 
can get so a little more pollution won't 
make any difference. That's a silly 
response to the serious problem of solid 
waste disposal that only is getting more 
complicated. 

Let's keep our eye on New York City. 
Wish the Big Apple success! 



Letters to the Editor 



Fill gap with tuition 

Editor 

A parent wrote that K-12 education was 
supposed to be free. The added tuition fees 
were not right 

I looked at my tax bill and found that 
Woodland School cost us $982.24 and 
Wanen High School $628.39, a total of 
$1,710.62. Education is not free. 

If parents want more for their children, 
why not charge tuition of several hundred 
dollars per child? Taxes of $1 ,710.62 are 
enough from us. 

Howard J. Sturm 
Gages Lake 

Building job resume 

Editor 

I suppose it is possible, with Grayslake 
turning into Schaumburg, that our parks 
administrator feels we need to enter "the 
big time." Or maybe he simply doesn't 
understand what is important to most 
families. 

My darker side, however, suspects that 
his real motivation is that he has his eye 
on a bigger and better job in a larger 
community. 

Producing an event like this year's 

festival can be an impressive notch in 

one's resume. If this is the case, I'll make 

a deal with him right now. 

If he will call off the next two years of 

12 Lakeland N«wipap«ft 



hyped-up festival, and turn it back into a 
community event, I'll write him him one 
hell of a letter of recommendation. 

Steve Kuemmerle 
Grayslake 

Bureaucratic bungling 

Editor 

A referendum on the ballot lo pay 
teachers up to $55.10 per hour is not the 
solution. Solutions are: 

1. Make the budget cuts that should 
have been made when the budget shortfall 
was brought to the surface. This will 
make the school solvent. If the teacher 
cuts aren't implemented the school should 
go into receivership. 

2. The school board hasn't learned not 
to spend money they don't have and Icam 
to spend and live within their means, like 
the taxpayers do. 

3. Get off the financial watch list. 

4. Pay off the tax anticipation war- 
rants and stop borrowing against the fu- 
ture. 

5. With many nine month teachers 
making up to over $69,000 in 1991-92, 
make the necessary cuts now to eliminate 
the estimated $600,000 deficit 

6. No referendum would be required if 
the top heavy adminisu-ation were rcduced. 

The taxpayers will not and should not 
pay 75 cents per $100 of a equalized as- 
(Continued on next page) 




i^^ai^lRSAB^- 



vainuiMnMJvsiwKxna 



Viewpoint 



Railroad yarn 
spins around 
'Old Maud' 



by BILL SCHROEDER 

Railroading fans and local history buffs 
will have a field day with a new book 
chronicling a fascinadng era of Lake 
County when entrepreneurs tried and 
succeeded in some cases to link the 
county's growing number of villages with 
steam and electric railways. 

Richard WhiUiey of Wauconda has done 
a great job in pulling together the story <rf 
early railroading in "Old Maud, the Story 
of the Palatine, Lake Zurich & Wauconda 
Railroad," just off the press. Whitney, 
who researched 30 years, assembled a 
highly readable, beautifully illustrated 
story of local history. 

My interest in the PLZ&W, as the short 
line came lb be kivown, was piqued as an 
eight-year-old upon noticing a couple of 
rails crossing old Rand Rd. south of 
Wauconda while on a drive with my 
gnmdparents a zillion years ago. Grandpa 
Meyer explained, "A railroad used to go 
through here. That's all that's left of it** 
Now Whiuicy tells the whole story, 

"Old Maud" was the name of the line's 
first locomotive. PLZ&W 
operations were intertwined for a time 
with another Lake County rail venture, 
the Waukegan, Rockford &. Elgin Traction 
Company, that was envisioned linking 
small towns like Gumce, Grayslake, 
Antioch, Round Lake, Long Lake and Fox 
Lake to a "major" electric line serving 
important northern Illinois cities. A 1900 
visionary sparked county rail interest by 
organizing the Waukegan, Fox Lake & 
Western Railway, but tracks failed to 
reach Gumee before the company folded. 

Plans for modem suburban commuting 
have an eerie sameness about them 
compared to those lum-of-ihc-centuiy 
cflbrts, I'd love to see Whitney 
reconstruct the history of other local 
railroads that form an exciting part of our 
heritage. 

••••••• 

LOOK INWARD—We can thank our 
Arkansas cone^Tondent, retired Lakeland 
Newspapers writer Helen Anderson, for 
some insightful thoughts on getting 
acquainted in a new community. Helen 
responded to comments in Lakeland's 
popular Lipservke column about Antioch 
and some other county towns being 
"unfriendly." 




Take a look at your own attitude, related 
Helen, who now is a village mistee of 
Gravette, Ark. "I remember being 
stationed at Great Lakes and thinking the 
Lake County area was an unfriendly place 
back in the early 50s. Then another 
swabbie gave me a good piece of advue. 
Try going to church off the base.' 

"What I found was that it wasn't the 
people in the area who were unfriendly. It 
was my attitude. I got off the base in 
some of my free time, and found activities 
in the area I could participate in. And 
everywhere we have lived I've used the 
same philosophy." 

Helen hasn't lost her keen news since. 
Two years ago she tipped off Viewpoint 
that the Arkansas governor would be a 
candidate for President in 1992. She didn't 
make any predictions, though. 

••••••• ' 

GOES WITH TURF—AU his years 
in the Navy didn't prepare Rear Adm. 
Mack C. Gaston, new commander of 
Great Lakes Naval Training Center, for 
one of his new duties. That's writing a 
weekly newspaper column. Adm. Gaston, 
who has been at his new post a little more 
than a week, inherited "Ask the Admiral," 
from his predecessor, Rear Adm. J.W. 
Partington, who retired. One of the most 
popular features in the Great Lakes 
Bulletin, official base newspaper, the 
column is a forum of questions from base 
personnel about life at Great Lakes which 
the admiral and his staff answer. "Ask the 
Admiral" is must reading for everyone at 
the base, civilians included. Welcome to 
Lake County, Adm. Gaston. 

••••••• 

ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Uncle Bill 
and Aunt Carol brought first-hand reports 
of Hurricane Andrew's rath when they fled 
Florida. Northern Illinois looks mighty 
enticing lo anyone who has ever "sat out" 
raging winds. Although they were 60 
miles from the path of devastation, 
shutters were torn off their home and 
fencing was knocked down. During the 
brunt of the storm, even residents on the 
fringe areas were imprisoned in their 
homes while the gale howled. We're 
enjoying their visit and in a small way, 
doing a bit to provide refuge. 




Friday, September 4, 1992 



' LWiibUJ'V^ALH.'*"^'?' 



I... .^^4 ..^ - ■.- 



-••'«o»*-»»ni6*-*«V*M^/«i.-^^^i. 



rn:;;:*; 



Lakeland's OPINION 



Letters 

(Continued from preceding page) 

scssed valuation because ihe administra- 
tion can't balance the books. We the tax- 
payers will not give an inch to bureau- 
cratic bungling. 

Vem A. Holmes 
Antioch 

Scared by Republicans 

Editon 

No group tows the party line more 
than Lake County Republicans as is 
shown in recent letters to the editor, but 
before we elevate Bush to the level of a 
saint, let's ask some questions about how 
he has performed in the last four years. 

Has be been the "Education 
President?" Is education belter off than it 
was in 1988? Then why do so many Lake 
County schools have mobile classrooms? 

Has he been the "Environmental 
President?" Then why does his own 
Kennebunk Port home have a waiver that 
allows direct discharge of sewage inU) the 
ocean? Why has the defuiition of wetlands 
been narrowed to allow more 
dcvetopment? 

Has he created a "kinder, gentler 
nation?" L.A, proved otherwise, or if you 
really think things are better overall, go 
take a walk in almost any Chicago 
neighborhood after 8 p.m., or simply read 
the crime reports as printed in Lakeland 
NewspE^wrs. 

In foreign policy, why is Hussein still 
in power? Or have you forgotten Bush's 
castigation of Hussein as a new Hitler 
just prior to the Gulf War. Did Bush 
bring down communism? No. The post- 
World War 11 competition between the 
U.S.S.R. and the United States was an 
economic competition, manifested by 
both industrial and military rivalry. We 
won the competition by spending 
ourselves into a tremendous debt, while 
the U.S.S.R. spent itself out of business. 



Are we the strongest, richest, freest 
nation on earUi? We would all like to 
think so. but Japan and the nations of 
Europe don't agree. Japan has a higher 
Gross Nation Product than does the 
United States. Our political influence in 
Europe is greatly diminished. Note that 
we can do what we want, militarily, in 
this hemisphere, but in other parts of the 
world we need consensus in order to acL 

Free? Why isn't the abortion issue 
between the woman, her doctor, and God? 
Why are Blacks and Hispanics the most 
poorly educated, under employed groups 
in our country? Lake Country 
Republicans, think for yourselves. This 
uncritical mouthing of the party line is 

^*^^- James C Schmitz 

Wauconda 

High fees for lawyers 

Editon 

On May IS, an altercation occurred at 
the Mundelein Coummunity Park 
concession stand during the Mundelein 
Little League season between a board 
member and a parent Subsequently on 
Aug. 19, the board member was found 
guilty of battery, in court 

On June 16, I spoke on the phone 
with a party who represented himself as 
the Mundelein Little League president I 
wanted to know why the board was 
willing to hear the board member's side of 
the incident, but I was never contacted by 
the league. He stated that if I would drop 
the battery charge (against the board 
member), the league would try to resolve 
the matter. He also stated that the Little 
League brings in lots of money, that he 
knows high-powered lawyers, and that he 
would really hate to sec me get involved 
with somthing messy. I told him that I 
would not drop the charge no one has the . 
right to injure anyone. 

Elections for the Mundelein Little 



Graduation rates 



About half the high school graduates who enter college never do get 
a degree. Of those who did graduate, these percentages took 4, 5, 6 
or more years to graduate: 



1977 



Five years 17.1% 



years 
6.2% 




More than six years 

22.9% 

SOURCES: Chicago Tribune. U.S. Department of Education 



1986 




Five years 20% 



Six 

years 

8% 



More than six years 
27% 



League are on Sept 12. 1 urge parents to 
consider the qualifications of. each 
individual when voting. There are people 
in the past who have done a wonderful 
job, but there are others who should not 
be involved with the public, especially 
children, even though it is voluntary. 

And if the Mudelcin Little League 
brings in so much money, why do the 
fees go up? Hopefully it's not going to 
pay for a "high-powered lawyer?" It would 
be interesting to have a year-end financial 
report available to each Little League 
family so we can see if our monies have 
been wisely utilized by the Little League 
boaid members. 

Shirley A. Modes 
Mundelein 

Value not received 

Editor. 

Three out of four employers say they 
need work place literate employees more 
than ever, yet only 35 percent test 
applicants for these basic skills. 

Sixty-three percent of 1,328 
employers know they have employees 
who cannot read, write or perform basic 



computations. Poor reading and writing 
skills cause over one-third of companies 
to regularly reject job applicants. 

All of the above from one news 
article. 

How can we expect to compete 
successfully with the Japanese whose 
level of basic skills is higher. Employers 
generally do not make use of high schools 
performance records in selecting 
employees and in effect tell students what 
you do in school is not important 

Our high schools continue to graduate 
students who are functionally illiterate in 
the work place and will not give meaning 
to a diploma by requiring a minimum 
competency test as a condition for 
^aduation. 

It costs about $7,000 a year for a high 
school education — $28,000 for four 
years — almost as much as education at 
some stale universities. Don't we deserve 
better results for our money? 

Don Smith 
Mundelein 

Editor's note: Don Smith is a 
member of the Mundelein High 
School Board of Education. 




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Pie in the apple 



An attractive, healthy and very tasty variation. 

4 large, Urt apples 

4 heaping This, mincemeat or pumpkin pie, 

crust included 

2 This, unsalted butter 

1/4 cup honey 

3/4 cup Maderia wine 

heavy cream (optional) 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Core apples to 1/2 inch of 
bottom. With paring knife, make top of hole a bit wider. 
Fill each apple with one heaping tablespoon of pie TUling. 
Dot with butler and fiizzle honey over apples. 

Heat Madeira wine in small saucepan and pour around 
bottom of apples. Bake for 30 minutes, basdng frcquendy. 

Serve apples immediately in small, shallow bowls. 
Pass the heavy cream if desired. 



Dutch apple cake 

1 1/4 cups riour 

1/2 tsp. salt 

1 tsp. sugar 

1 tsp. baking powder 

1/2 cup butter 

1 egg yolk 

2 This, milk 

2 cups apples peeled* cored, and in eighths 
3/4 cup brown sugar 

1 1/2 tsps. flour 

2 This, butter 

1/4 tsp. cinnamon 

1/4 tsp. nutmeg 

Stir together flour, salt sugar, and baking powder, 
combine with butler, egg yolk, and milk. Line a buttered 
8x8-inch cake pan with mixture; cover with apples. 

Combine remaining ingredients and sprinkle over 



apples. Bake at 375 degrees for 30 minutes, or until apples 
are tender. Cool before serving. 

Applesauce cookies 

1 cup sugar 

1 cup margarine 

1 egg 

2 cups flour 

1 TbI. baking powder 

1/2 tsp. salt 

1/4 tsp. cloves 

1/2 cup raisins 

1/2 cup chopped nuts 

1 cup applesauce 

Cream togeUier sugar and margarine; add egg. Mix in 
next 7 ingredients, then add applesauce. Drop by teaspoons, 
two inches sqiart, onto greased cookie sheets. Bake 15 to 20 
minutes at 350 degrees. 

Makes 4 dozen cookies. 




READY PICKED 
APPIJE)S»! 




J--t 



Oa(o^ 



fip/iing9 ©/iclia/id 

(414) 877-3436 

34920 - 128th Street 

TMrtn Lakes, Whconsm ^^^^^ ^^^^ g.^^ ^^^.^ ^^ 




Friday, September 4, 1992 



NAWIStHE 

REASON! 

FALL IS THE SEASON! 

Gather up all your 

favorite Harvest time 

recipes and send them 

in! We will feature them 

in this weekly section 

running through Oct. 30. 

Send your recipes to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

"Recipes" 

RO. Box 268 

GraysIakeJL 60030 

Among All Entries 

Received, 

Winners Will Be 

Chosen Based 

On Originality and 

Creativityl 



OWN 



PICK 



YQUl 



ZIEGLER'S 
ORCHARD 

IT'S THAT TIME OF YEAR^ 
APPLE PICKING IS NEAR! 



Plan your family outing next 

weekend at Ziegler's Orchard 

to pick, to taste and then go 

hbnne and bake, for lasting 

family memories 



Watch for details. 

For more information: 

'(708) 546-1228' 



Lakftland Newspapers 13 



A* 



H^ 



Lakeland's OPINION 









McRae tries to be kissing cousin 



IT HAPPENED AGAIN 

Round Lake Park Trustee Bob 
Wallen is ready to swear off summer va- 
cations. 

Last month he took the family to Ohio 
and Niagara Falls. 

While gone, the mayor and village 
board demoted Village Clerk Star 
Southworth to a secretary. 

After naming former Village Clerk 
Helen Purol to the new $9.50 an hour 
job of administrative assistant, South- 
worth does little more than take minutes 
at weekly village board meetings. 

Almost the same happened two years 
ago. Wallen vacationed. Police Chief Eno 
Satdivar was canned. 

"Damn! It happened again," he said of 
the latest coup. 

KISSING IN PUBLIC 

Colin McRae has a few credits: 12- 
year retired mayor of Mundelein, for- 
mer Republican precinct committeeman, 
current member of the Lake County Board, 
member of the Lake County Health Board 
and point man for County Board Chairman 
Robert Depke. 

But a gentleman he is not 
Thai's the opinion of at least one 
County Board colleague, Carol Cal- 
abresa of Libertyville. 



It was reinforced at last month's 
County Board meeting. Members were 
discussing the firing of Health Dept 
Director Steven Potsic. 

Calabresa pointedly said the ouster was 
engineered by Depke and called it political. 

McRae over reacted. 

"If you can prove I did anything vming 
I'll kiss your behind at halftime on the SO 
yard line of Sunday's Bears game," he said. 

Calabresa was shocked. So are a lot of 
other people. 

McRae, he's yet to apologize. Or show 
up at the next Bears game. 

POLITICAL TRUCE 

One of the friendliest political races on 
record is shaping up in County Board 
DisL 18. 

It pits Vernon Hills Trustee Pam 
Newton against BulTalo Grove resi- 
dent Li2 Payer, Pam is the GOP stan- 
dard bearer, Liz the Democrat 

So far they've agreed on no plastic bag 
door hangers, no klutzy trinkets and no 
literature war. They're negotiating sign and 
spending limits. 

Payer, the poorer of the two candidates, 
says signs are not environmentally 
friendly. The same for glossy mailing 
pieces like Newlon used in the spring 
primary. 



Newton has kHs of money, backing 
and resources if she wants to call on them. 

Payer, a part-time College of Lake 
County instructor, doesn't have that. This 
is her first foray into politics. She is also 
a health nut 

"What she does have going," one caller 
said, "is she's beautiful, brawny, brainy 
and sophisticated." 

OVERHEARD/SEEN 

«l 4 # # LINDENHURST— This 
has been a banner swim season at the 
Camp Ravenswood pool. The generally 
coot summer has made the constant tem- 
perature of the Hastings pool highly 
inviting. Some members say attendance 
has been almost winter-like. ##fl4 
ANTIQCH—W atch out Jim Fields 
(Dist 1 County Board member). Nor- 
man Geary is coming to town. He's the 
former chairman of the Lake County Board 
and Avon Twp. political fixture for 27 
years. Geary will be an Antioch resident 
by November. But not until after election 
day. 4444 ROUND LAKE 
BEACH — "Cnnsnlidfltinn is coming" is 
a theme Mayor Carl Schrimpf has been 
repeating for years. "Someday the Round 
Lake communities will be one." When? 
Not in his political lifetime, the mayor 
admits. "But someday." If so, it could 




mean the biggest Lake County commu- 
nity outside of Waukegan. 

COMING EVENTS 

^^M Friday. Sept. 



Democratic golf ouUng, Foss Park Golf 
Course, 3124 Argonne Dr., North 
Chicago, followed by 7:30 p.m. dinner at 
Basil's Ramada Inn, North Chicago. Tick- 
ets are $75 for golf, cait and dinner or $3S 
for dinner only. Call Democratic Central 
Committee at (708) 234-6333.#lliill 









GARDEN 



RTE. 12 & 

>3 




o 



Volot Illinois 
8T5.344.m7 




SALE STARTS 9/1/92-9/15/92 
WHILE SUPPLIES LAST 

ALL NURSERY STOCK 

TREES • SHRUBS • EVERGREENS 



A Quality Full Service Garden Cenler 
Landscape Design • Construction • Maintenanra 

WE HAVE IT ALL 






AND 

MORE! 



JUNIPERS 

BLUE RUG 
OR ANDORRA 




PERENNIALS 

HUGE SELECTION 
TO CHOOSE FROM 



I 



14 lakeland ftowspaport 



Friday, September 4, 1 992 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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dh Oct. 4 



Mark your calendars 
now for the second annual 
Lake County Family 
YMCA Airfest scheduled 
for Oct 4 at the Waukegan 
Regional Airport A fun- 
filled day of activities for 
the whole family takes off 
at 7 a.m. with a pancake 
breakfast sponsored by the 
YMCA Camp Jom Board 
of Managers, followed by 
food, fun and high-flying 
special events, include 
Dave Dacy's Clip Wing T- 
Craft and more. 

In addition to the two- 
hour air show by Dave 



Dacy and Friends, the 
Nissan Skydivers and Great 
Lakes Naval Band will also 
be featured at the second 
annual Airfest 

Airplane rides, trade 
show, flybys firom some of 
the area's larger aircraft 
military ground displays 
and tours also highlight the 
day's activities. 

Mark your calendars now 
for this spectacular event 
Admission for the Airfest 
is $6 per person; children 
under S are admitted free. 
Parking is $2. 

Proceeds &om the Airfest 



benefit the Lake County 
Family YMCA scholarship 
fund to help youth, single 
parents and senior citizens 
take advantage of YMCA 
programs. For more 
information, 1-800-LAKE 
NOW. 

Tradeshow 
Booths 

The tradeshow booths 
will, include a 10-foot space 
with one table and two 
chairs, and will cost $200. 



NIU lists honors 



The following students 

have been named to 

Northern Illinois, DeKalb 

dean's list for the 1992 

spring semester. 
Antloch 

Patricia Crumpler, Dan Grote, 
Kate Suck. 
Fox Lake 

Robert Lahey. 
Gages Lake 

Robert Thumme, Roy 
Thumme. 
Gurnee 

Jeannette Ugolini. 
Island Lake 

Glenn Carlson, Christina 
Rcckwcrdt. 
Lake Villa . 

Kristophcr Kauth. 
Lake Zurich 

Donna Falco, Jacob Hcidcn- 



rcich, Nan<^ Kuhn, Steven Kuhn. 
LIbertyville 

Katherin Barrcttsmith, Pre- 
ston Came, Dustin Dobrin, Kris- 
ten Esop, Jack Fischler, Peter 
Madion. Jennifer Swan, Robeit 
Wocbinifki. 
Mundeletn 

Michael Kerrigan, Beth Kcr- 
stcn, Michael Kweller, Amy 
Swinca, Domcnicfc Tiziano, 
Philip Edward. 
Round Lake Beach 

Barbara Klein, Nicole Srzyp. 
Spring Grove 

Elaine Couris, Thomas Cul- 
hanc, Kimberly Mason, Peggy 
Miller. 
Vernon Hills 

Jamei Heckman, Mel Heck- 
man, Tana Higman, Stacey Man- 
hecr, Jennifer Pfaffcnbach, 
Vetonika Smid, "Uigba Sonmez. 



Pet Of The Week 




Bubby Bear 



He's a live teddy bear 



Bubby Bear is a gor- 
geous, male silver and black 
purebred red Elkhound. A 
resident at the shelter since 
November, 1991, this 10- 
year-old "teddy bear" would 
happily crawl right into 
your lap, if you'll let him! 
As gentle and sweet as a 
dog can be, Bubby Bear has 
a thick plush beautiful coat 
and an outstanding personal- 
ity. Strong, active and in 
excellent health, Bubby 
Bear has quality years of lief 
ahead of him — years that 
will bring him and his 
adoptive family much joy. 
This huggable sweetheart 
deserves to spend his golden 
years in a home, and not in 



10,000 new voters added 



Lake County Clerk Linda Hess 
announced that 10,000 new voten have 
been added to the voter registration 
rolls since early summer. "We're 
absolutely delighted with the figure, 
and the interest in the upcoming 
presidential election," Hess said. 

"The credit for these figures goes to 
all the 1,469 deputy registrars in Lake 
County representing business, labor, 
education civic groups and political 
parties who are volunteering their time 
every week to sign up residents to 



vote. They deserve a big hand for 
reaching 40 percent of our 25,000 voter 
goal this early." 

Hess says she's appointed 179 new 
registrars since May to help in the 
effort "Our goal is 200 new registrars, 
and we're almost there." 

Individuals who want to register or 
have moved in the last year and need to 
change their address can call 360-6628 
for more information (Hi the nearest 
place of registration. 

Voter registraticHi closes on Oct 5. 



a cage. 

Bubby Bear is available 
at Orphans of the Storm, 
2200 Riverwoods Rd. in 
Dcerfield for a $55 cash do- 
nation which includes free 
spay/neuter, collar, leash, 
first shots, two weeks med- 
ical care and more. Hours 
are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven 
days a week. Call (708)945- 
0235 for further informa- 
tion. 

Taco the one-year-old 
black and tan Doberman/ 
shepherd and Chelsea, the 
two-year-old female chow/ 
shepherd mix that were 
previously featured have 
been adopted. 



<*53 mosfe years! GO BELL'S GO!!" 



It's Appltf Pieking Time At: 

PLE ORCHARD 

Hwy 2X-1/4 Mile W. OS Rt. 12 

Beti^een BarHngton 

& Lake Zurich 

(708) 4^8-2211 




Mother Nature Supplied An Early Bumper Crop of 

BIG Apples Ready NOW! 



l?l?liat is our 
SECRET 

of the Desert? 

Come in and find out! 



GRANDPARENTS DAY 

September 13th 

Complhnentary cider 

doughnut for grandparents 

and grandchildren 



Grand Openingl 

September 16th 

Art In The 
Orchards 



Picking Hours — 9am to 5pm Store Hours — 7am to 7pm 

Pull or part time positions available call: (708) 438-2211 



LEASE FOR ONLY $405.00 A MOIMTH 



DRIVE A NEW UD 
FOR ONLY $405.00 
PER MONTH. 



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1992 UD 1300 WITH 14 US VAN BODY. 

.Turbo Diesel Engine, 6 spd transmission 

.13,000 GVWR. 

.Radial Tires 

. AM.FM, Cassette 

.33 Gallon Fuel Tank 

.3 YearAJnIimited Mileage Engine Warranty 

.2 YearAJnIimited Drivetraln Warranty 



Whitmore*s UD Truck Sales 



Zion, Illinois 



708-872-6532 



♦Payment does not include taxes, title, registration or license. At the end of 60 months customer purchases the 
truck for $4,307.00. See Dealer for details. With approved credit. 



I 



1992 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 15 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



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One member of a calvary unit shows 
his spirit OS he holds up a sword. Below, • 
a reenactor smiles as he converses 
with friends. 



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Rrst Chicago Ught Artillery Unit fires off a canr»on during ihe reerxactment In 1991 . Below, a child 
who carT>e with his parents, wtx) are reenactors. represent a member of the Infantry. — Photos 
courtesy of Lake County Museum. 

Civil War revisited 

Reenactment slated for Sept 12-13 



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early 130 years ago, guns fired and cannons shot 
at the Battle of Bull Run. It was the beginning of 
the Civil War. Some believe the war l^egan to save 
the union, some believe it began to save, or elim- 
inate, slaves. 

Whatever the reason, and there were many 
theories, America has come a long way since 
brothers fought against brothere. But for one 
weekend, Sept. 12 and Sept. 13, the public 
can call the museum to learn how to become 
a reenactor to participate this year by calling 
the Lake County Museum or watch a reen- 
actment of the Civil War at the Lakewood 
Forest Preserve near Wauconda. 

Kris Brcyer, Inventor and organizer of the 
event, attempted to schedule the event for 
the 125th anniversary of the war, but Lake 
County Forest Preserve Commissioner were 
doubtAil and the proposal did not pass. 

"It took seven years to get the Lake County 
Forest Preserve Board to try it," Breyer said. 
"It was something that had never been done 
and it involved a lot of offices diat had never 
worked together before." 

Brcyer has been a Civil War reenactor since 
the 1970s. Ten years ago she moved in next 
to the forest preserve and "it screamed out 
first-person tilstorical events," she said. 

It took three years of bringing horses and 
people to different events dressed in old- 
fashion clothing to convince the commis- 
sioners that this was an event people would 
be interested in. Horse-drawn carriages and 
formally dressed women would participate 
in events such as the winter walk program, holiday Sunday 
near Christmastime, old-fashion Stmday in September 
and pioneer days. 

"The county began realizing that people enjoyed this and 
that it should be adopted into the program," Breyer said. 

In 1989, tlie departments worked together to arrange the 
Civil War reenactment for its first year presentation. 

The first year the commissioners were flabbergasted," 
Breyer said. "Almost 3,000 people showed up to watch the 
event and about 100 reenactors attended. Then they asked 



if we would do it again the following 
year." 

That first year, Civil War Days won a 
$700 grant from the Illinois Fine Arts 
Council, which never before had given a 
grant for a Civil War reenactment. 

Last year, despite the "horrendous 



by HEATHER MCDONALD 



weather," about 3,000 people attended 
and 300 reenactors participated in the 
event. The event received the 1991 
Innovative Program Award from the 
UUnois Parks and Recreation Association. 

"We're doing something right," Breyer 
said. This year, the event will try for 
graphics and promotional awards, 
according to Brcyer. 

The Lakewood Forest Preserve receives 
funding for the event from Harris Bank, 
the local Moose Lodge, Island Foods, 
Dunldn Donuts, the News-Sun, and other 
businesses throughout Lake County. 

But Civil Wars Days is not an event that 
Is centered on the Lake County area. The 
event is advertised in national reenactor 
magazines and many people come from 
around the nation to participate. Vendors 
who come to sell various "old-fashioned" 
goods come from as far away as 
Pennsylvania and Colorado to participate. 

Performance artists from Michigan have 
called this year and asked to participate in 
the reenactment and a music group from 
Nashville, Tenn. who participated in pre- 
vious years has asked to return, according 
to Breyer. 

There are various levels of reenacting, 
Breyer said. People who are Interested in a 
specific individual may present that Indi- 
vidual to the public or a specific military 
unit, calvary unit, even a medical impres- 
sion. Many of the unit presentations rep- 
resent actual units raised in northern 



Illinois, according to Brcyer. 

"Research has been done to find out 
who was from this area, what they did, 
v^at unit they participated in and present 
that Individual to the public in a reenact- 
ment," Breyer said. 

Part of the reason Breyer believed the 
Civil War reenactment would be a good 
thing for Lake County is because of the 
scenery and the museum. 

"The museum is there and if you want 

7f iook seyon years to get the Lake 
County Forest Preserve Board to 
try It... then they asked if we could 
do it again.' 

— Kris Breyer 

people to learn about the history of Lake 
County, we needed to get events out there 
that people would attend," Breyer said. 
"If s the perfect place to hold interpretive, 
first-person historical events, 

"We have conmiissioners who had never 
seen the Lakewood Forest Preserve, and 
they were amazed by the beauty," she 
added. 

Breyer said that Civil War Days has been 
a big factor in letting people know about 
the museum and teaching them about the 
history of Lake County. 

"This event has really drawn people to 
get Involved with the museum," Breyer 
said. "We have had students say 'wow! 
this is better than our history books/ 
Students who have graduated from 
Wauconda High School have participated 
and said they've learned more from par- 
ticipating than they did In high school. 

Aside from the reenactments. Civil War 
Days also offers a fashion show, various 
drills, competitions, tea and a military ball 
over the course of the two-day event For 
more information or a schedule of events 
caU 526-7878.. 



16 Lakeland N«wsp' 



Friday, Septemtwr 4, 1992 




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With the long days of summer coming to an end, come an 
abundant supply of finesh vegetables picked off ripe vines and 
bushes and plucked from the patch- 
Here are some suggestions for you to use to capture the 
freshness and flavor of these sununer treasures. 



Pesto Sauce 

If you' ve grown fresh basil in your herb garden this year, you're truly fortunate. The 
weather has been kind, and this crop is plentiful. Pesto sauce is made from basil leaves, 
parsley, garlic and Parmesan cheese. It's uses are many, but teamed with hot, cooked 
pasta is still my favorite. Do yourself a favor and try my recipe. 

4-6 garlic cloves, chopped 1/4 c. chopped pine nuts, optional 

16 large fresh basil leaves 1/2 c. salt 

3 parsley sprigs l/2c.o!hwoU 

6 T. Parmesan cheese 

In electric blender, blend all ingredients except oil to make 
a smooth paste. 

Slowly, blend in oil and stir until mbced. Serve over hot pasta. 
Makes 3/4-1 cup 



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Chicken Satays with Peanut Dipping Sauce 

These tasty kebabs make a great appetizer or main 
course for a barbecue. The peanut dipping sauce is a 
must to fully enjoy this ettuiic treat 
Satays: 

1/4 c. soy sauce 1 T. sugar 

1/4 c. lemon Juke 2 lbs. skinless, boneless chicken breasts, 

3T.011 cut into thin strips 

Peanut Dipping Sauce: 

2 garlic cloves 1 /4 tsp. crushed hot rod pepper, 

2 shallots or hot pepper sauce 

2 T. lemon Juice 3/4 c. peanut butter 

2 T. brown sugar 3/4 c cream of coconut milk 

1/2 tsp. ground coriander 

In a medium bowl, combine soy sauce, lemon juice, oil 
and sugar. Add chicken strips. Let them marinate at room 
temperature, tossing occasionally for 30 minutes. 

Combine garlic, shallots, lime juice, brown sugar, coriander and hot pepper in a food 
processor. Process until gariic and shallots are finely chopped. Add peanut butter and 
coconut milk. Keep processbig till smooth. 

Thread chicken on 10-inch wooden picks or skewers that have been soaked in water 
for a half an hour. (By soaking the wooden skewers in water, there is less chance of their 
burning on the grUL) Grill over direct medium-iiigh heat for 10 minutes, until tender 
and opaque. Baste with peanut butter sauce. Serve remaining sauce for dipping. 
ScrvesS 



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Rhubarb Cake 

All that beautifid rhubarb growing, and what to do with it? This is my 
mother's recipe witli some minor changcs...l use a cake mix. 
Mbc togethen 

1 cake mix (puddlng-In-the-cake type) 

Follow directions on package adding amounts of water, oil and egg whites. 
Spread batter in bottom of greased 9x13" pan 
Mbc togethen 

7 c. diced fresh rhubarb 

1 pkg. (3 oz.) strawberry Jello 

1/2 c sugar 
Spread on top of batter. Sprinkle following mixtiu-e on top of rhubarb: 

1 /2 c. sugar 

1/4 c. flour 

3 T. butter 
Combine until mbrture forms crumbs. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-50 
minutes. 



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Garden Markers 

Garden markers arc a novel Idea for use 
next spring. Cut flower and vegetable 
shapes from styrofoam from meat and 
produce trays. Color with water-proof felt 
tip markers and glue to garden stakes. 
These will be used to mark garden rows 
next planting season. 




Mixed Fresh 
Herb Vinegar 

I make this every year and love it. 
Now is the time to preserve some of your 
garden herbs. Herb vinegar corked in clean, 
clear wine bottles make attractive and 
welcome gifts for feUow cooks at Christmas- 
time. 

1/2 c. chopped fresh rosemary 

1/2 c. chopped fresh thyme 

4 shallots, thinly sliced 

1 sprig fresh parsley, chopped 

12 peppercorns 

3 3/4 c. white vinegar (5% acidity) 

Sprigs of fresh rosemary and thyme 

Place first 5 ingredients in a wide-mouth 
glass jar. Place vinegar in a medium 
saucepan; bring to a boil. Pour vinegar over 
herbs in jar; cover with a lid and screw band 
tight Let stand at room temperature for 5 days. 

Strain vmegar into clean, sterile wine bottles, discarding heib residue; add additional 
sprigs of rosemary and thyme to make it pretty. Seal with new cork or other airtight lid. 
Corked tops may be dipped into melted parafm for a sealed look. 




Sweet Refrigerator Pickle Chips 

So easy to make with all those cucumbers that have been growing in your 
garden. Make and store in the fridge, I'll be surprised if many are left. 

7 c sliced cucumbers 

1 large onion, sliced 

1/2 c. salt 

Place sliced cucumbers in large bowl, add sliced onions and cover with 
salt Mbc to coat Cover with ice 
chips and let stand for 2 hours. 
Boil: 

3 c. sugar 

1 3/4 c vinegar 

11//2T. celery seed 

Bring to a rolling boil in a small saucepan. Cool. Drain 
sliced cucumbers and rinse slightly. Put in clean covered 
jar and pour syrup over the cucumbers and onions. 
Store m refrigerator. 




Gazpacho 

This should be a summer-time favorite...Salad in a soup-bowil Tomatoes are the main 
ingredient, but without tlie bite of garlic and onion, gazpacho would not be as zesty and 
refreshing. Serve in chilled bowls. 



1-1 1/2 c. beef broth or water 
Hot pepper sauce 
Worcestershire sauce 
Freshly ground pepper 
Croutons 



4 large ripe tomatoes 

2 1/2 cucumbers 

1 large green pepper 

10-12 scalllons 

2-3 cloves garlic 

Salt 

1/4 c. red wine vinegar 

1/3 c. olive oil 

3 c. tomato juice (or V8) 

Peel, seed and chop or dice the tomatoes and 2 of the 
cucumbers. Wash and trim pepper and scallions and 
dice. Mash garlic with 1 tsp. salt Beat in vinegar and oil. 
Combine this dressing with the chopped vegetables and 
stir in the tomato juice. Add broth or water to desired 
consistency Season with hot pepper sauce, 
Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Chill. Slice 1/2 cucumber paper thin. Serve 
gazpacho in chilled bowls with cucumber slices and croutons. Serves 4-6 




Friday, September 4. 1992 



Lakeland Nowspapen 17 






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Rrst Chicago Ught Artillery Unit fires off a cannon during ttie reenactment In 1991 . Below, a ctilld 
wtio came witti his parents, who are reenactors, represent a member of the Infantry. — Photos 
courtesy of Lake County Museum. 

Civil War revisited 

Reenactment slated for Sept. 12-13 



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early 130 years ago, guns fired and cannons shot 
at the Battle of Bull Run. It was the beginning of 
the Civil War. Some believe the war began to save 
the union, some believe it began to save, or elim- 
inate, slaves. 

Whatever the reason, and there were many 
theories, America has come a long way since 
brothers fought against brothers. But for one 
weekend, Sept. 12 and Sept. 13, the public 
can call the museum to Icam how to become 
a rccnactor to participate this year by calling 
the Lake County Museum or watch a reen- 
actment of the Civil War at the Lakcwood 
Forest Preserve near Wauconda. 

Kris Brcyer, inventor and organizer of the 
event, attempted to schedule the event for 
the 125th anniversary of the war, but Lake 
County Forest Preserve Commissioners were 
doubtful and the proposal did not pass. 

"It took seven years to get the Lake County 
Forest Preserve Board to try it," Breyer said. 
"It was something that had never been done 
and it involved a lot of ofHccs that had never 
worked together before." 

Brcyer has been a Civil War rccnactor since 
the 1970s. Ten years ago she moved in next 
to the forest preserve and "it screamed out 
first-person historical events," she said. 

It took three years of bringing horses and 
people to different events dressed in old- 
fashion clothing to convince the commis- 
sioners that this was an event people would 
be interested in. Horse-drawn carriages and 
formally dressed women would participate 
in events such as the winter walk program, holiday Sunday 
near Christmastime, old-fashion Sunday in September 
and pioneer days. 

The county began realizing that people enjoyed this and 
that it should be adopted into the program," Breyer said. 

In 1989, the departments worked together to arrange the 
Civil War reenactment for its first year presentation. 

"The first year the connmissioners were flabbergasted," 
Breyer said. "Almost 3,000 people showed up to watch the 
event and about 100 reenactors attended. Then they asked 




One member of a calvary unit shows 
Ns spirit as tie holds up a sword. Below, 
a reenactor smiles as he converses 
with friends. ; /. 



if we would do it again the following 
year." 

That first year, Civil War Days won a 
$700 grant from the Illinois Fine Arts 
Council, which never before had given a 
grant for a Civil War reenactment 

Last year, despite the "horrendous 



by HEATHER McDONALD 



weather," about 3,000 people attended 
and 300 reenactors participated in the 
event. The event received the 1991 
Innovative Program Award from the 
Illinois Parks and Recreation Association. 

"We're doing something right," Brcyer 
said. This year, the event will try for 
graphics and promotional awards, 
according to Breyer. 

The Lakcwood Forest Preserve receives 
funding for the event from Harris Bank, 
the local Moose Lodge, Island Foods, 
Dunkin Donuts, the News-Sun, and other 
businesses throughout Lake County. 

But Civil Wars Days is not an event that 
is centered on the Lake County area. The 
event is advertised in national rccnactor 
magazines and many people come from 
around the nation to participate. Vendors 
who come to sell various "old-fashioned" 
goods come from as far away as 
Pennsylvania and Colorado to participate. 

Performance artists from Michigan have 
called this year and asked to participate in 
the reenactment and a music group from 
Nashville, Tenn. who participated in pre- 
vious years has asked to return, according 
to Breyer, 

There are various levels of rccnacting, 
Breyer said. People who are interested In a 
specific individual may present that indi- 
vidual to the public or a specific military 
unit, calvary unit, even a medical impres- 
sion. Many of the unit presentations rep- 
resent actual units raised In northern 




Illinois, according to Breyer. 

"Research has been done to find out 
who was from this area, what they did, 
what unit they participated in and present 
that individual to the public in a reenact- 
ment," Breyer said. 

Part of the reason Breyer believed the 
Civil War reenactment would be a good 
thing for Lake County is because of the 
scenery and the museum. 

"The museum Is there and if you want 

'If took seven years to get the Lake 
County Forest Presen/e Board to 
try lt...ttien tfiey asked if we could 
do It again.' 

— Kris Breyer 



people to learn about the history of Lake 
County, we needed to get events out there 
that people would attend," Brcyer said, 
"It's tfie perfect place to hold interpretive, 
first-person historical events. 

"We have commissioners who had never 
seen the Lakcwood Forest Preserve, and 
they were amazed by the beauty," she 
added. 

Breyer said that Civil War Days has been 
a big factor in letting people know about 
the museum and teaching them about the 
history of Lake County. 

"This event has really drawn people to 
get involved with the museum," Breyer 
said. "We have had students say 'wow! 
this is better than our history books.' 
Students who have graduated from 
Wauconda High School have participated 
and said they've learned more from par- 
ticipating than they did in high school 

Aside from the recnactments. Civil War 
Days also offers a fashion show, various 
drlUs, competitions, tea and a military ball 
over the course of the two-day event. For 
more information or a schedule of events 
call 526-7878. 






16 Lakolond Hewsp' 



Friday, Septemtier 4, 1992 







id out 
sy did, 
trcsent 
enact- 
ed the 
a good 
of the 

Li want 




Ireyer 

of Lake 
lit there 
cr said, 
pretive, 

,d never 
ve, and 
y/' she 

as been 
V about 
)out the 

iopie to 
Breyer 
^ 'Wowl 
boolcs.' 
d from 
[cipatcd 
iih par- 
lool. 
ivU War 
various 
taiyball 
ent. For 
if events 

ir4. 1992 



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with the long days of summer coming to an end, come an 
abundant supply of fresh vegetables picked off ripe vines and 
bushes and plucked from the patch. 

Here are some suggestions for you to use to capture the 
freshness and flavor of these summer treasures. 



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Pesto Sauce 

If you've grown fresh basil in your herb garden this year, you're truly fortunate. The 
weather has been kind, and this crop is plentiful. Pesto sauce is made from basil leaves, 
parsley, garilc and Parmesan cheese. It's uses are many, but teamed witfi hot, cooked 
pasta is still my favorite. Do yourself a favor and try my recipe. 

4-6 garlic cloves, chopped 1/4 c. chopped pine nuts, optional 

16 large fresh bastl leaves 1/2 c. salt 

3 parsley sprigs 1/2 c. olive oil 

8 T. Parmesan cheese 

In electric blender, blend all ingredients except oil to make 
a smooth paste. 

Slowly, blend in oil and stir until mixed. Serve over hot pasta. 
Makes 3/4-1 cup 



Chicken Satuyswith Peanut Dipping Sauce 

These tasty kebabs make a great appetizer or main 
course for a barbecue. The peanut dipping sauce is a 
must to fully enjoy this ethnic treat 
Satays: 

1/4 c. soy sauce 1 T. sugar 

1/4 c. lemon juice 2 lbs. skinless, boneless chicken breasts, 

3 T. oil cut Into thin strips 

Peanut Dipping Sauce: 

2 garlic cloves 1/4 tsp. crushed hot red pepper, 

2 shallots or hot pepper sauce 

2 T. lemon juice 3/4 c. peanut butter 

2 T. brown sugar 3/4 c cream of coconut milk 

1 /2 tsp. ground coriander 

In a medium bowl, combine soy sauce, lemon juice, oil 
and sugar. Add chicken strips. Let them marinate at room 
tempcratuie, tossing occasionally for 30 minutes. 

Combine garlic, shallots, lime juice, brown sugar, coriander and hot pepper in a food 
processor. Process until garlic and shallots arc ftnely chopped. Add peanut butter and 
coconut milk. Keep processing till smooth. 

Thread chicken on 10-inch wooden picks or skewers that have been soaked in water 
for a half an hour. (By soaking the wooden skewers in water, there is less chance of their 
burning on the grilL) Grill over direct medium-high heat for 10 minutes, until tender 
and opaque. Baste vdth peanut butter sauce. Serve remaining sauce for dipping. 
Serves 8 



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Rhubarb Cake 

All that beautiful rhubarb growing, and what to do with it? This Is my 
mother's recipe with some minor changes...! use a cake mix. 
Mix together 

1 cake mix (puddlng-In-the-cake type) 

Follow directions on package adding amounts of water, oil and eggwriWtes. 
Spread batter in bottom of greased 9x13" pan 
Mix together 

7 c diced fresh rhubarb 

1 pkg. (3 oz.) strawberry jello 

1/2 c. sugar 
Spread on top of batter. Sprinkle following mixture on top of rhubarb: 

1/2 c. sugar 

1/4 c. flour 

3 T. butter 
Combine until mbcture forms crumbs. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-50 
minutes. 



Garden Markers 

Garden markers arc a novel idea for use 
next spring. Cut flower and vegetable 
shapes from styrofoam from meat and 
produce trays. Color with water-proof felt 
tip markers and glue to garden stakes. 
These will be used to mark garden rows 
next planting season. 



Mixed Fresh 
Herb Vinegar 







Sweet Refrigerator Pickle Chips 

So easy to make with all those cucumbers that have been growing in your 
garden. Make and store in the fridge, I'll be surprised if many are left 

7 c sliced cucumbers 

1 laige onion, sliced 

1/2 c. salt 

Place sliced cucumbers in large bowl, add sliced onions and cover with 
salt Mix to coat Cover with ice 
chips and let stand for 2 hours. 
BoU: 

3 c. sugar 

1 3/4 c vinegar 

11//2T. celery seed 

Bring to a rolling boil in a small saucepan. Cool. Drain 
sliced cucumbers and rinse slightiy Put in clean covered 
jar and pour syrup over the cucumbers and onions. 
Store in refrigerator. 



I make tills every year and love it 
Now Is the time to preserve some of your 
garden herbs. Herb vinegar corked in clean, 
clear wine bottles make attractive and 
welcome gifts for fellow cooks at Christmas- 
time. 

1/2 c. chopped fresh rosemary 

1/2 c. chopped fresh thyme 

4 shallots, thinly sliced 

1 sprig fresh parsley, chopped 

12 peppercorns 

3 3/4 c. white vinegar (5% acidity) 

Sprigs of fresh rosemary and thyme 

Place first 5 ingredients in a wide- mouth 
^ass jar. Place vinegar in a medium 
saucepan; bring to a boil. Pour vinegar over 
herbs in jar; cover with a lid and screw band 
tight Let stand at room temperature for 5 days. 

Strain vinegar into clean, sterile wine botUes, discarding herb residue; add additional 
sprigs of rosemary and thyme to make it pretty. Seal with new cork or otiier airtight lid. 
Corked tops may be dipped into melted parafm for a sealed look. 




Gazpacho 

This should be a summer-time favorite...Salad in a soup-bowi! Tomatoes are the main 
ingredient but without the bite of garlic and onion, gazpacho would not be as zesty and 
refreshing. Serve in chilled bowls. 



1-1 1/2 c. beef broth or water 
Hot pepper sauce 
Worcestershire sauce 
Freshly ground pepper 
Croutons 




4 large ripe tomatoes 

2 1/2 cucumbers 
1 large green pepper 
10-12 scalllons 
2-3 cloves garlic 
Salt 

1/4 c. red wine vinegar 
1/3 c. olive oil 

3 c. tomato juice (or V8) 

Peel, seed and chop or dice the tomatoes and 2 of the 
cucumbers. Wash and trim pepper and scallions and 
dice. Mash gariic with 1 tsp. salt Beat in vinegar and oil. 
Combine this dressing with die chopped vegetables and 
stir in the tomato juice. Add broth or water to desired 
consistency. Season with hot pepper sauce, 
Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. ChUl. Slice 1/2 cucumber paper diin. Serve 
gazpacho in chilled bowls with cucumber slices and croutons. Serves 4-6 




Friday, September 4, 1992 



lakeland Newspapers 17 



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celand Leisure 



the fall semester which begins on Sept. 10 
through Jaa 23. There will also be "adult only" 
classes sterling SepL 10 through Jan. 23. For 
further Information call (708)367-7970. 

I Folk music 

Bob Gand and Lana Rae with their 
"Traveling Folk Music Show" will be 
I featured at "Discover Ravinia Day" at 1 
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 5 on Roger 
Williams Ave., Highland Park. Sponsors 
Include the Merchants of Ravinia, 
Highland Park Chamber of Commerce 
and the city of Highland Park. Call 
(708)432-0284 for Information. 

I Concert chorus 

Auditions for the Waukegan Concert 
Chorus will be held Wednesday, Sept. 2 
through Saturday, Sept. 5. Rehearsals arc 
Tuesday evening from 7 to 10 p.m. at the First 
Presbyterian Church. 122 N. Utlca St. 
Waukegan. Call (708)360-4742 for Information. 

Symphony openhigs 

The North Suburban Symphony of Lake 
Forest has openings In the string and brass sec- 
tions. Starting on Sept B rehearsals vdll be held 
on Tuesday evenings at 7:45 p.m. and perfor- 
mances on Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Gorton 
Community Center In Lake Forest For further 
information call (708)926-8554. 



[Author to speak 

Daniel J. Slngal, author and recipient 
I of the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award 
will be the speaker on Tuesday, Sept B 
at Lake Forest College, 555 N. Sheridan 
Rd., Lake Forest The public is invited 
free of charge to the 10:30 a.m. convo- 
cation at Lily Retd Holt Memorial 
Chapel, locat^ on LFC's middle cam- 
pus, Sheridan and College Rds. For fur- 
ther Informatlon'contact (708)735- 
1 6010. 

'Hay Fever* 

CenteiStage will be holding auditions 
for their fall production "Hay Fever* on 
Saturday, Sept. 12 from 10 a.m. to 3 
p.m. and Sunday, Sept 13 from 1 to 4 
p.m. at the Gorton Community Center, 
400 E. Illinois Rd, Lake Forest. 
Performances v^dll be Nov. 13, 14, 20 
and 21. For further Information call 
(708)234-6062. 

Auditions 

Marriott's Lincolnshire will be holding pre- 
liminary auditions for children in the Sound of 
Music on Sunday, Sept 13. Looking to cast four 
girls, ages Ave to 12 and two boys, ages 1 1 to 14. 
Appointments will be taken starting Tuesday, 
Sept. B at 10 a.m. For appointments call 
(708)634-0204. 

'Labor Day Bines' 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance Qub 
is holding a 'Labor Day Blues" dance 
on Friday, Sept 4 from 8:30 to 1 1 p.m. 
at First United Methodist Church, 128 
N. Utlca St, Waukegan. It will be held 
in the Fellowship Hall. CaU (708)662- 
6546 for further information. 



Classes offered 



Square dance 



I The David Adler Cultural Center 
(DACC)/ 1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
LlbertyvUle is ofTering a wide array of 
classes for all ages In visual arts, 
ihreater, music and garden arts. A 
complete listing of classes is available 
at the center. Most classes begin Sept 
15 through Dec 1. To register contact 
(708)367-0707. 
Art in the bam 
Good Sheperd Hosptlal will hold an 
art show and sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on 
Saturday and Sunday, Sept 26 and 27 in the 
rustic farm buildings on the hospital campus 
located on Hwy 22 two mUes west of Rte 59. 
Admission Is $3 per person and free for chil- 
dren under 12. CaU (708)526-1426 for informa- 
tion. . 



C/D 



There will be an annual Lambs 
Square Dance Jamboree at Lambs 

Farm, 1-94 and Rte. 176, Llbertyville on 

Sunday, Sept 6 from 1 to 4 p.nt Free admis- 
sioa Call (708)362-4636 for further details. 

Registration and classes 

Dancenter North, 540 N. Milvniakee Ave., 
Llbertyville is now accepting registrations for 

ISixth annual auction 

The Sbrth Armual AucUon of the United Protestant Church, 54 S. Whlmey St, Graysiakc 
Iwill be held on Saturday, Sept 12 from noon to 5 p.m. There is a $2 fee to purchase a bidder's 
[card . CaU (708)223-8131 for detaUs. 

jWomen in management 

The L^e Suburban Chapter of Women In Management will kick-off Its new year at the 
iCoimtry Squire in Grayslakc on Wednesday, Sept 16 at 5:30 p.nt "Women who are making It 
[happen in politics' will be the topic. There will be a reception and dlrmer afterwards. For 
■reservations call (708)295-0370. 

(Weekend celebration 

Promotional events highlight the four-day Labor Day weekend holiday, Sept 4 to 7 at 
iDairyland Greyhound Park, 1-94 and Rte. 158, Kenosha, Wis. Friday will have doublcheader 
programs and 50 cent specials, Saturday night is Funjet Wallet Night, Sunday Is Poster Day and 
Monday a set of Greyhound Collector Cards to the first 4,5000 paid admissions. For information call 
(800)233-3357. 

Living free program 

Friday evening community videotape/lecture seminars are facilitated by the Living Free 
Program clinical staff and are free of charge. These will provide basic information on substance 
abuse and recovery. Seminars are Sept 4 "Chalk Talk on Alcoholism," Sept 11 "Pieces of Silence," 
Sept 18 "My Father's Son" and Sept. 25 "Staying Sober, Keeping Strai^t" They will be held at 
Condeli Conference Center, Rms A-D, 700 Garfield Ave., Libcrtyvlllc from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Call 
(708)816-7867 for more informaUon. 

Share yoiu- goodwill 

Goodwill Industries of Lake County has a donation trailer located at Wal-Mart, 6510 Grand Ave., 
Gurnee. Contributions can be made on the first and thbd Saturday of every month. CaU (708)949- 
4664 for information. 

Lawn mower racing 

It's time for the Sta-bil National Lawn Mower RacUig Championship to be held Sept 5 at the 
Lake County Fahgrounds In Grayslakc. Admission Is $5 for adults and $4 for seniors and children 
under 12 free while accompanied by a parent Gates open at 11 a.nt CaU (708)729-7363 for informa- 
tioa 

Car show and swap meet 

The Bth Aimual Skip's Graffiti Gold Car Show and Swap Meet will be held at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds, Grayslakc on Sept 6 through 8 from B a.m. to 4 p.m. Thirty-six auto classes with Hrst, 
second, and third place trophies. Judged show with dash plaques for ail entrants. Many coUectlblc 
cars will be for sale, plus a giant auto parts swap meet Prercglstration discounts and plenty of Skip's 
good food will be available. General admission is $5. Call (708)682-8792 for further information. 

*Ix)ramoor' tour 

Come and see the 1992 Lake Geneva Designers' Showhousc opening now until Sept 6. 
Admission is $8 In advance and $10 at the door. Tours arc Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday evening, 7 to 9 p.m. No children under 10, no high heels or 
cameras. For hiformation call (414)249-0206. 

Labor Day picnic 

Northlake Singles will hold a Labor Day picnic at Moraine Hills State Park off River Rd. between 
McHeniy and Island Lake on Monday, Sept 7. Call (708)265-1387 for tknc and further Information. 

Golf lessons 

Autunm golf lessons will begin the second week of September at the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Countryside Golf Course, Hawlcy Rd., Mundelcin. Prc-registratlon Is required llie fee is 
$48 for the four-week program. For details call (708)566-5544. 
(Continued on page 19) .^/.. -. 



The Sixteenth Annual 



Spimtorcrf Ity Coflitrll MntiMl Center 
LltiFflyville, Ijlinoil 



CONDELL DISTANCE 




CLASSIC 



SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1992 

Condeli Medical Center, 900 Garfield Ave., Llbertyville 
8:1 am • Condeli One Mile Fun Run ($5) 
8:1 am • Centre Club 5K Run/Walk ($7) 
9:00 am •I OK Race 

TAC Sanctioned and Certified 
($1 2 through Sept. 1 0, $17 after) 

T-SHIRTS TO FIRST XOOO REGISTRANTS 

Breakfast and Random Drawings after the races for all registrants 
AWARDS TO WINNERS IN ALL RACES 

PACKET PICK-UP AND REGISTRATION IN PERSON: 

• 8:30 am - 6:30 pm, Monday - Friday, September 14-18; 

• 9:00 am - 5:00 pm, Saturday, September 19, 

Condell's Public Relations Department entrance, 303 Cleveland Ave. 

at the back of the hospital. Condeli is west of Milwaukee Ave. 

(Rt. 21) between Rt. 176 and Golf Road on Garfield Ave. 

For more information, 

call Condeli Medical Center 

(708) 362-2905 ext. 5275 

(CUT HERE) 



RACE REGISTRATION FORM cp^asePmt] 



Namo: 



AddroBs: 



CKy, State, Zip: 

Telophone Number: (Day>:_( )_ 



(Evenlng):_C 



Date of Birth: 



Sex: 



Age on September 20, 1992:_ 



Cheek If approprlaU: 

D Efnployae of Condeli Medical Center 
D Member of Condeli Medical Staff 

I am rsginteri ng for: (Check appropriate boxes] 

n 10K Race • $12 through September 10: $17 after 

D One Mile Fun Run • $5 at all times 

a 5K Run/Walk • $7 at all times 

D I am a TAC or CARA member. M/ number Is 



(Deduct $1 from 10K Race fee only. Only one deduction allowed.) 

TOTAL ENCLOSED 






lOKAgeCiiu: (Check one) 
,^_ 14 years and under 

AS to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

__ 25 to 29 years 
30 to 34 years 



35 to 39 years 
, 40 to 44 years 

45 to 49 years 
, 50 to 54 years 
. 55 to 59 years 



,60 to 64 years 
.65 to 69 years 
.70 years and over 
. Heavyweight 
(200 lbs. and over) 



NOTE: All runners, except the heavyweight group, must run In a specific age class. Heavyweights 
run In tfie Heavyweight dass only. 



T-SHIRT SIZE: (Check one) 
Adult: (Adult shirts are men's sizes) 
S mall Medium 

10-12 



-Large 



_X-Large 



_XX-Large 



Child: ^ 

I, , In consideration of Condeli Medical Center allowing me 

10 participate In the Condeli Distance Classic, September 20, 1992, do, for myself, my heirs, execu- 
tors, and administrators, waive and release all rights and claims for damages I may have against at! 
organizers, sponsors, olfidals or staff of Condeli Medical Center, Llbertyville, llllinols, for all claims of 
damages, demands, and actions whatsoever In any manner, as a result of my participation In those 
activities. 



Signature 



Date 



(Parent or guardian signature is required for participants under 16 years of age.) 

Make your check payable to Condeli Medical Center. 

Mail registration form wHh payment to: 
Public Relations Department 
Condeli Medical Center 
900 Garfield Avenue 
Libertyville, IL 60048 
Mail-h registrations must be redeved no later than Friday, September 11. There Is rw registra- 
tion the day of (he rat», No change of evant (from one to another) can be mada on Race Day, 

I _J 

Sponsored in part by the Lakeland Newspapers, Centre Club. First Colonial Banii of 
Lake County, The Heartland. Jobs Printing & Mailing, and Vogue Printers. 



18 Lakotond N«wspop«rs 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



— aA^';ilc^:fj>.//i; ii . 



f tJt> Ait* 4* I* t*)"*** ^***^ 'A '*****'**« 4 '•■*'*-•>* r«M (ATI t*t« n «« 4 W • ■. Mm* .•,«.• M -Jt M t » M ^ * % » M 



< M H H *i At«f « 






;ic 




the night . . . 



I¥iday 

Cheryl Ann and the Maverick Band will hit Sundance Saloon, Routes 176 and 83, 949- 
08S8...Legendaiy blues with Magic Slhn and the Teaidropt at Slice of Chicago, 36 S. 
Noithwest Hwy., Palatine, 991 -2150...11ie Rage will perform the music of Bonnie Raitt, 
the B-52s, Robert Cray and theh own originals at River Bend, 6614 Rawson Bridge Road In 
Gary, 639-7700...KooI Luke and the Coo Cooi will polka away the night at Vi's Yellow Bird 
Lounge, Route 173 and Lotus Avenue in Antioch, 395-6461. 

Saturday 

CooKlout Pohit is at Milwaukee Roadhouse In Libertyville, 680~9330...The Rage at River 
Bend...KDol Luke at Vi's YeUow Bird Lounge...Maglc SUm at SUce...Cheiyl Ann and the 
Maverick Bond at Sundance.— Iiy GLAUDIA M. LENABT 




(Contfaiued inun page Id) 

Surplus sale 

Government Surplus Property will be conducted at the E>efensc RcutUlzatJon and MarlcclJng 
OfiDce, Great Lakes on Sept 10. The sale is open to the public and will start promptly at 9 a.m. In 
Bldg. 3212C. Registration will start at 8 a.ni. In BIdg. 3212A. Children under age 16 must be accompa- 
nied by an adult For Information (706)688-3655. 

Weekend getaway 

The Lake County Family YMCA's Women's Getaway Weekend provides a variety of fitness class- 
es as well as Informal workshops on wellness. This year's Getaway Weekend Is scheduled for Sept 10 
to 13. Weekend fee Includes room and board, balatKed meals and snacks, all fitness classes, sem- 
inars and activities, plus a camp gift A $50 deposit Is required upon registration. For more informa- 
tion conUct Terl or Alison at the YMCA, (70a}360-962Z 

Second city to perform at CLC 

The nationally-known Second City comedy troupe will be performing In the auditorium at the 
Collie of Lalffi County, 19351 W. Washbigton SL on Friday, Sept 11 at 7 and 9 p.m. The group is 
best known for their comedy improvisatkins of creating real-life situations from Ideas suggested by 
the audience. The members brir^an empty stage to life to present a refreshing view of current polit- 
ical, ctiltural and social issues. The program Is Intended for a mature audience due to the adult 
nature of the program. Tickets are $7 general admission and $5 for CLC students and alumnL For 
tickets call (708)223-6601 exL 2300. 

Annual Brat and Com Festival 

St John's United Church of Christ, 1520 McAree Rd, Wauiee^n is sponsoring its annual brat and 
com festival on Saturday, Sept 12 from noon to 6:30 p.m. A craft fair is an Integral part of the festival. 
Grafters interested in reserving a space conUct Wendy Celesnik at (708)662-4243. Space fee Is $20. 



A Lake County Tradition Since 1944 

FRIGATE 



RESTAURANT 
ON LONG LAKE 



**Where you*U always £lnd someone from the 
Sabatlnl family In the kitchen to prepare great f cmmI** 



SENIOR DINING SAVINGS EVERY MON. & TUBS. 4:30 - 8:00 



OR 

Mostaccioli or Fries 
• Dessert 



6 CHEF'S SPECIALS TO CHOOSE FROM 

• Complete Salad Bar * Double Baked Potato 

• Homemade Soup 

• Fresh Vegetable 

• Rolls & Butter 

PLUS 
A BEVERAGE (Can be Alcoholic or NonAlcoholic) 

GATHER TOGETHER A ONLY $5.45 

GROUP, CALL AHEAD, SO 

WE CAN SEAT YOU ALL TOGETHER 587-321 1 



BEARS FANS!! 




$225.00 

per person. 



PRESENTS A ROAD TRIP!! 

BEARS - vs. - VIKINGS 

SATURDAY OCTOBER 3, AND SUNDAY OCTOBER 4, 1992 

Price Incli 



Over Night Hotel Accommodations 
in Minnesota. 



Tailgate Brunch Sunday Morning at 
the Hotel Before Game, 



picnic Dinner Sunday on the Bus. 

Ticket to See the Bears WIN! 

All Beverages During Transportation. 



DEATH BECOMES HER (PG 13) 
HONEYMOOK IN VEGAS (PG13) 
^ LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN (PG) 

hi' 



TWIN PEAKS-FiRE WALK WITH HE (fl) 



Bus Transportation to and from 
Minnesota: 

Lunch on the Bus and Dinner 
Saturday at the Hotel. 

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS SHOW UP, LEAVE THE DRIVING TO US, 
CHEER THE BEARS ON TO VICTORY AND HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND!! 

TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION 

Bus Departs Kristof 's at 8:00 a.m. SHARP Saturday Morning. 

(BLOODY MARYS OPTIONAL.) 

Bus Returns to Kristof 's at Approximately 1 1 :00 p.m. Sunday Evening. 

DON'T MISS THIS ONE! SIGN UP NOW!!! 



STRANGERS AMONG US (PG13) 



,¥;:-!,;f;'s:;>:i;->j:;f-:Ks:'X<^^K-' 



WtltlftMS 



FRI.. MON.-THURS, 
7&9 



OUT ON rir—H 



NAME 



REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

PHONE NUMBER 



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GRAYSLAKE OUTDOOR 

AT 120 A AT 83 
GRAYSLAKE ??3-Bl55 



Mchenry outdoor 

CHAPEL HILL flO 
McHENRY (8151 385-0144 



OPEN FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY & MONDAY 



'5" ADULTS-CHILD (11 1 Undif) FREE 
SHOW STARTS T:« fM 

HONEYMOON IN VEGAS (PG13) 
also 
SINGLE WHITE 
' FEMALE (R) 




'5" WUITS-CHILO [11 1 UndHl FREE 

SHOW ST*flTS 7:<S PM 
CLINT EASTWOOD 

UNFQBGIVEN (R) 

also 

PET SEMATARY II (R| 



a 

H 
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ITJTXIiri 



Hi 



CITY, STATE 
ZIP 



NUMBER COMING 
$225,00 = 



TOTAL 



{payment tn full required) 

mke checks payable to: KRISTOF'S ENTERTAINMENT CENTER and mal! to or drop off at 

421 W. ROLLINS ROAD 
ROUND LAKE BEACH, ILLINOIS 60073 

(708)546-2512 



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Bears season means Morris back on TV 




Veteran sportscaster Johnny Morris, 57, has had a distinguished career in Chicago 
television for 28 years. Now "semi-retired" from the daily sports scene, you will see plenty 
of Johnny Morris all throughout the Bears football season on WBBM-TV where he will be 
hosting "The Mike Ditka Show," "Bears Extra" on Sunday nights, and the live "Locker 
Room" show after each Bears game. Morris said he has enjoyed his fhst three months of 
"semi-retkcment" "I just got to the point in my life where I preferred not to work on a 

daily show. I wanted to enjoy time with my 
family and the fruits of my labors over the last 
28 years." 

Prior to joining WBBM-TV, Johnny enjoyed a 
successful 1 0-year career with the Chicago 
Bears. He played from 1958 to 1967 and is the 
Chicago Bears' all-time pass receiver with 
more than 5,000 yards to his credit. His best 
season was in 1964 when he had 93 receptions 
for 1,200 yards. 

Johnny has lived in Lake County for more 
than 20 years and can't imagine living any- 
where else. 

CURRENTLY WORKING ON: The Bears sea- 
son for Channel 2. I'll be doing the live "Locker 
Room" show after the Bears games, "The Mike 
Ditka Show" and "Sports Extra" on Sunday 
nights on Channel 2. 
BEST PART OF LIVING IN LAKE COUNTY: 
_ , Ml I've lived out here for 20 years and I love that it 

johnny Morrig j^, ^^^^ ^^^ ^^.^j ^^ community is really 

nice and comfortable. 

FAVORITE LAKE COUNTY RESTAURANT: The Bam In Barrlngton. 

FAVORITE MUSIC: like a lot of dlfTercnt types of music, but I probably like reggae the 
best 

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR FUN; Play bridge and now that I'm semi-retired I'm learning 
to play golf. 

HOBBIES: Arlington Park. I love every aspect of it I love the strength and endurance 
of the jockeys, the beauty of the horses and I love charting the races and trying to get a 
winner. 

THE DUMBEST THINE YOU'VE EVER DONE: WhUe interviewing former Dallas 
Cowboy quarterback Craig Morton for a past Superbowl, I kept calling him over and over 
Don Meridlth and he never corrected me. (Craig was Don's back-up). That was one of the 
most cmtiarrasshig moments in my television career. 

PEOPLE DESCRIBE ME AS: Competitive. I like to win at what 1 do. While I was work- 
ing full-time I was very driven but since I've semi-retired I've mellowed. 

BEST ADVICE YOU'VE EVER RECEIVED: It was from an old coach of mine George 
Allen who told me no matter vi/hat, no one is indispensable. I tried to remember that in 
football and in television. It keeps you from getting a big ego. 



S^p-' ^^ 




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*^ lINFORGEriAm^ UNKWV OF 

SONG^ ©(tfO MIX SPEdAGLE" ♦ 

IS COMING TO CHICAGb! 



Chicago Tribune 




%; 



\- 



M9ss 
Saigon 



Can ^3^^ HOTLINE (312) 559-2900 

Tickets also available at the box oflke (Mon.-Sat lOam'Cpm, Sun. llam-4pm ) 
and aUIicketmaster centen including Caiv^ Rose Records.: T 

Groups of 35 or moreU^ 

AUDITORIUM THEAIJIE, 50 East Coti 



WHAT MOTIVATES YOU: To win, to do well. I'm 5-foot-lO and 180 pounds and for a 
football player that was quite small so 1 had to strive to be one of the best I had the speed 
but not the size so I became very driven. 

YOUR OPINION ON THE PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL PLAYERS OF TODAY: When I 
was playing I didn't get much money at all. It was pure motivation. You didn't get multi- 
year, million dollar contracts. It is a whole different ball game but everything changes 
witch each generation, and for the most part, it has changed for the better. 

FAVORITE ENTERTAINER: Robin Williams. He's brilliant and the funniest man alive. 
FAVORITE TELEVISION PROGRAMS: Any sports, the (old) Honeymooners, Colombo. 

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN lOHNNY MORRIS TODAY AND 10 YEARS AGO: I'm 

not as driven today because I'm not working as much. I'm livhig a much more passive 
life. Ten years ago I was striving, saving and working to get ready to retire. The best years 
of the rest of my life are the next 10 years. 

WHAPS IN YOUR FUTURE: More traveling, going to Arlington Park and our lake 
home in Wisconsin. 



^ WAUKEGAN ^ 

harbo 










'■', .-■••, . , • ' 






The Waukegan Port District 

Would Lilce To Thanlc 

All Tlie People Who 

Worked So Hard Ito Put 

Together A Fantastic Harbor Daze Event. 

Thanks to all the committee members, sponsors, 
participants, volunteers, and employees. 

Also thanks to all the people who attended Harbor Daze. 
All of you made Harbor Daze a Tremendous Success. 



WE WILL BE CLOSED 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 

LABOR DAY 

ALL FACILITIES 

ANTIOCH AND LINDENHURST 




MAIN OFFICE 



LINDENHURST FACILITY 



(708) 395-2700 



(708) 356-5700 



440 Lake St. • Antioch, IL 



2031 E. Grand • Lindenhurst, IL 



&^^l€i4t€llu Sr€yi/m^^a^ the- c^ri^^^d &teai€/pt 

SPM^C€. 1/894. f^ 




Have a safe and happy holiday 



HJUtl HOUSINO 

LENDER 



AFUIL 

SERVICE 

GANK 



20 Lakotond N«wspap«rs 



Friday, Sopt0mb«r 4, 1992 



.. -*^ti)'<l'i7^:£?.>7Jtii.v 



Ifora 
speed 

t^enl 
multl- 
langcs 

alive. 
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I-KIDAY 



I Garden Club 

Donna Schumann will talk at the District IX, Garden 
iQubs of Illinois, Flower Show School on Friday, Sept 4 at 
the Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe. Advanced registra- 
tion is requeated For further Information call (708)778- 
8692. 

Parent group 

The Parent Group, formally Lake County Parents 
I Anonymous, Is the world's laigest family resource net- 
woric Weekly parent support groups offer parents effec- 
tive parenting alternatives. The group meets In 
Waukegan, Friday mornings from 9 to 11 a.m.; ZIon, 
Wednesday afternoons from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. and Thursday 
evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. In Vernon Hills, No cost child care is 
provided. Call Anna or Jennifer at (708)263-7272 for further 
details. 



SATUUOAY 



Embroiderer's Guild 

The North Suburban Embroiderers' Guild will hold their flrst 
meeting of the year on Tuesday, Sept 8 at the VUJage Presbyterian 
Church of Northbrook, 1300 N. Shermer Rd. at 9:30 a.m. The pub- 
lic Is invited and fee Is $3. For more information call Tokiko 
Blaine at (708)255-7545. 

Genealogical Society 

The Lake County (IL) Genealogical Society will meet on 
Tuesday, Sept B at 7:30 p.m at Cook Memorial Library, 413 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyviile. For information call Joan at 
(708)566-1789 or Wanda at (708)546-4145. 

IFMA meeting 

The monthly meeting of the Northern Illinois Chapter of the 
International Facility Management Association (IFMA) will be 
held at 5:30 p.ni on Tuesday, Sept B at Raidnla, 201 S. St Johns 
Rd, Highland Park. Admission, which Includes dinner, is $15 for 
IFMA members and $20 for non-members. For reservations call 
(708)769-2112 by Sept 4. 



W1^I>I\1^S1>AY 



Help for aching backs 



Enroll your children now 

Opening Tuesday, Sept. 6 will be a Children's Corner 
Developmental Center, 888 E. Belvidere Rd., Unit 107, Grayslake, 
(708)548-2880. Quality programs of developmental skills for chU- 
dren three to sbc years old will be offered. There will be an open 
house on Saturday, Sept 5 from noon until 4. For Information 
call June Glogousky at (708)362-0949 or Lorna Collar (708)249- 
2560. 



SUNDAY 



Come and look 

visit the 1850 AndrewC. Cook brick fami house and museum at 
711 N. Main St, Waconda. This restored rural Greek revival style 
house is open from 1 to 4 p.m. every Sunday. Admission free, 
donations appreciated. Call (708)526-9303 for Information. 



TUllSOAY 



Networking Exchange to meet 

The Networking Exchange will hold a group meeting on 
Tuesday, Sept 8 at 11:30 a.m. In Mundeleln. The Exchange con- 
sists of women and men dedicated to help each member and 
their business grow through referrals. For directions contact 
Charmaine Estep at (708)548-1010. 



Lake Forest Hospital's Spinal Rehabilitation Program begins 
Its next four-week sessions on Wednesday, SepL 9 and October 14 
at 6:45 p.m. in the hospital Conference Center, 660 N. 
Westmoreland Rd., Lake Forest Each week consists of lectures, 
fllms and exercises to help participants strengthen their backs. 
For Information call (708)234-6134. 



La Leche League 



The Libertyviile North Chapter of La Leche League 
Intemational will meet at 9:45 a.m. Wednesday, Sept 9 at 1029 W. 
Park Ave., Libertyviile. Call (708)566-1780 for Information. 



THURSDAY 



Hospital o£fers RK 

Lake Forest Hosptial offers "A New Look on Life: The RK 
Option" on Thursday, Sept 10 at 7:30 p.m. In the hospital's 
Conference Center, 660 N. Westmoreland Rd. , Lake Forest Dr. 
Bradley Ruff, LFH Ophlhalmologisl, will lead you on an eye-open- 
ing journey Into the world of Radial Keratotomy— the vision-cor- 
recting alternative to wearing contact lenses or glasses. Call 
(708)234-6112. 



LITY 

: 

ii: 



8 



If police forces, fire 
departments, 
paramedic services 
and hospitals can rely 
on us to fulfill their 
communications 
needs, we think you 
should, too. 

(815)385-4224 
1 -800-747-4225 



Mobile 
Phones 



Mobile 
Offices 



Two-Way 

|Communi»tiona 



Emergency 

I Communications 



Data it Voice 
Systems 



ing/Sigtuling 
Systems 



Se04Chif>timRoad 



"Your Communications Authority" Mi,nyTmo^3i 



College of Lake County 

Student Activities 
presents 



Friday 

September 11 
7:00 & 9:00 p.m. 
CLC Auditorium 

19351 West Washington Street 
Graystake, Illinois 



"JfM 

treet ^ • 



Admission: $7 general public 

$5 CLC students/alumni 

VISA, Mastercard and Discover accepted. 

Advanced ticket purchase is recommended. 

Call the Activities Box Office 

at 223-6601. ext. 2300. 

Material includes adult humor. 



THE AGENT WHO INSURES YOUR 
CAR AND HOME CAN ALSO PROTECT 

YOUR FAMILY'S 
FUTURE. 




n 



For lite insurance that can provide tinancial 
security for those you love, call: 



Jack Martin 

Delany Square 

1810DelanyRd. 

Gurnee, IL 










336-6800 



(D State Fami Sells Life Insurance. 



state Farm Lite Insurance Company 
Home OHice: Bloominglon, Illinois 



HOST 
FAmUES 
i\EEDED 

mm 



ALBERTO, 17 YEARS MONICA, 16 YEARS 

Families to host internalional oxcliiingc 
students arc needed now! Choo.se your 
high school exchange student from among 
several boys and girls, 15-18 years old 
who arc eager to share their culture. with 
you as they learn about yours. 

Enrich your family and make a lifelong 
friend of a young overseas visitor. 

Call now to select your own exchange 
student (Single parents and couples 
without children at home can qualify.) 

Call E. DeLain (708) 872-8602 
Jodi at 1-800-888-9040 (Toll Free) 

Own 

Spending 

Money! 

SPANISH HERITAGE 

SPANISH lerTAGF, is A PUBLIC HlvSKFrr. NON-PROnr ORGAN KA'nON 



Fully jC=5 
Insured! "^ 




Parenting support group 

The YWCA Parenting Support Group for women meets 
Thursdays at 7 p.m, 2133 Belvtdcrc Rd, Waukegan. The next ses- 
sion wUl be SepL 10. Call (708}662-4291 for Infonnatlon and regis- 
tratlon. 



COMING SOON 



Landscaping seminar 

Highland Green Nursery, Inc., Rle. 120 and Cedar Lake RA, 
Grayslake will be sponsoring on a short seminar on landscaping 
basics for the do - 1 l-yourscif homeowner at 10 a.m. and again at 2 
p.m. Call (708)546-5160 for information. 

After scliool care 

The YMCA of Lake County has expanded lis programming for 
school-age children by offering after school care for morning 
klndcrgartners in some Waukegan schools. They will pick up the 
children and bring them to the licensed school-age center in the 
Belvidere Mall, where parents will pick ihem up by 6 p.m. For 
informaUon {708)662-4247. 

New support group forming 

A support group for persons diagnosed with Reflex 
Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) Is presently being formed. The 
meetings will be held at Northern Illinois Medical Center, located 
ai Bull Valley Rd and Rle. 31 In McHenry. For Information call 
(708)292-7900. 

Necommer orientation 

Parents Without Farmers will hold a ncwcommer orientation 
on Monday, SepL 14 at Freemonl Public Library, 470 N. Lake St., 
Mundeleln. General meetings will be Friday, Sept 11 and 25 at 
The Princess, 1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyviile. Call (708)265- 
0833 for information. 



WARREN'S 

We specialize in repairing 
Barley Davidson motorcycles 

Stop in and visit 
our showroom 
for a full line of 
jaccessories. 




546-8613 

1221 Rollins Rd.> Round Lake Heights | 

Airlines Anti-trust Claims 
Settlement Procedures 

By Jim Warnken, President 
North Star Travel, Inc. 

You may have heard about a proposed settlement to a 
class actfon suit brought against several major airlines for 
alleged price fixing. Here are some answers to the many 
questions I have been asked. 

First of all, this is only a proposed settlement. The court will 
not rule on it until October 19, 1992. Even if it is accepted, 
which is questionable at this time, there is no advantage to 
filing a claim before (Dctober 19. In fact, claimants have until 
February 15, 1993 to file, and will have no advantage to filing 
earlier. Additionally. It you tile now and the courts reject the 
plan, you may have to fife again. 

If the plan is accepted, anyone who purchased a ticket for 
domestic air travel between January 1, 1988 and June 30, 
1992 would be eligible to share in about $400 million in 
coupons for discounts off future travel. 

Claims are filed under one of three classes with a different 
claim form for each. 

A short form may be filed by anyone substantiating one 
qualifying trip and is considered a $1,000 claim. An 
intermediate form is used by those claiming 5 round trips and 
is valued at $2,500. There is also a long form for those 
wishing to claim more than $2,500. 

Intermediate filers must total their number of ticket 
purchases by airline. Long form filers must total dollar 
purchases broken down by six nxxith sub-totals. 

All claimants must be prepared to back-up their claims with 
proof of purchases such as credit card statements, canceled 
checks, frequent flyer statements or expense acco'unt records. 
Some airlines will research this information for you. but will 
likely charge a fee. 

If the proposal is accepted, the value of the coupons issued 
to each claimant is likely to be minimal, since the $400 million 
in coupons must be divided among an enormous number of 
daimanls. Coupons will not be useable for more than 10% of 
the value of new ticket purchases. 

Additionally, the airlines have proposed that coupons not be 
redeemable on tickets purchased through your travel agent. 



fitiwm sr/iR ma§f£i me. 



2234 E. Grand Undenhurst, 111. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708) 356-3010 



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ACROSS 

1. Hansom 
4. Greek 
portico 
8. Pitch 

12. Pub drink 

13. Actor Rip 

14. Nautical 
term 

15. Zoo dweller 

17. Bosc 

18. Follows a 
stage cue 

19. Mr. Amin 

21. New: comb, 
form 

22. Like Italian 
shoes 

26. Miser's 
motivation 

29. Sow's home 

30. Japanese 
sash 

31. Scads 

32. — -relief 
33. "— Street" 

34. Greek peak 

35. Electric one, 
at times 

36. Impressions 

37. "You — to 
My Heart" 

39. Clique 

40. Beer cask 

41. One of a 
family of mites 

45. Famous 

vessel 
48, Zoo dweller 

50. Above 

51. Check 

52. Sugar: a 
suffix 

53. Persian fairy 




54. Mailed 
55. Jones or 
Poston 
DOWN 

1. Bakery item 

2. Actor Alda 

3. Distorted 

4. Gazed rudely 

5. Trunk 

6. Spanish gold 

7. Consecrates 

8. Zoo dweller 

9. Bullfight cheer 

10. Black or Red 

11. Weight of 
India 

16. Heredity 

factors 
20. Word with 



bed 

23. Type of 

horse 

24. Newspaper 
item 

25. Comes in 
first 

26. Smooth 

27. Traveled by 
train 

28. And others 



(abbr.) 
29. Gal of song 
32. "— Opera" 
33. Gold or 

silver 

35. Vane 
direction 

36. Upstanding 

38. Zoo dweller 

39. Gown 
material 




el World 



Roommates join babysitters 
as new violence vendors 

If filtndom has its way we will all soon be boarding our houses up and allowing admit- 
tance to only immediate family and qualifying that Who can you trust, by golly! 

Narm/s and babysitters, once the most noble of professions, are going off the deep 
end — husbands are not to be trusted, teachers are rats and now we have to beware of 
our roommates. 

"Single White Female," Is an "AU About 
Eve" with fright effects. 

We have the glamorous Bridget Fonda, 
who turns in her best performance to date, 
bebg virtually gobbled up mentally and physi- 
cally by her shy new roommate, played coldly 
by Jennifer Jason Leigh. 

The change In the two giris' personalities 
Is the crux of the first part of the movie with a 
lot of bloody mayhem taking over in the sec- 
ond part 

The suspense that builds masterfully is 
interrupted by an overdose of blood at the cli- 
max. 

Director Barbet Schroeder does an overall 
good job but the blood-letting gets way out of 
hand. 

Ihe two men that add to this credible cast 
are Steven Weber who plays Fonda's roving boyfriend and a dirty minded boss played by 
Stephen ToboIowskL 

We'll give "Single White Female" three out of five stars, on sheer fright rights while 
subtracting two points for the needless btood and guts towards the finale. The violence 
and sex keeps this one in the adult vault with an "R" rating. — by GLORIA DAVIS 




nm 




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708-688-HELP 



The Victory 

Memorial 

Chemical 

Dependency 

Program 



If you or 
someone 
you love is 
slniggling 
wilhan 
alcohol or 
drug 

addiction, a single phone 
call can put you m touch ■ 
wiih the professional, 
confidential help you need. 
Don'l wait another day — 
make the call that can 
change your life. 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1324 North Sheridan Rd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 





Bridget Fonda 
Jennifer |a»on Leigh 



FRIGATE RESTAURANT 

on Long Lake 

THURSDAY NIGHT 
SPECIAL 



It's Picking 
Time! 

QUfG'S ORCHARD 

Country Store & Restouront 
Greenhouse & Craft Shop 

PICK YOUR OWN APPLES 

OPEN 9 AM -5 PM 

APPLES AVAILABLE 
IN STORE 

Paula Red Available in Store 

Macintosh .Now 

Jonathan Sept. 17 

Red Delicious Sept. 24 

Rome Beauty Oct. 1 

Golden Delicious Oct. 1 

(Picking at 450/lb., 20 lb. minimum) 

Restaurant Open 

7 AM- 2:30 PM 

566-4520 



Rt. 83 (60) -1/4 Mile West of 
Midlothian Rd., Mundelein 



95j 



SURF & TURF 

Sirloin steak *" 
& Lobster, includes ^ 
Soup, Salad Bar, & ^ 

Double Baked Potato^ 

Also Available Our Popular 9 



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Prime Rib of Beef ty^s J 

includes soup, salad bar, & potato 9 

587-3211 H 



We Make A Lot Of Copiers 
For Those Who Make A 






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If you're in the 'hish-volume" end of copying, you're not alone. So are we. 

Mita makes a variety of slate-of-the-art copying systems designed to handle your 

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such as automatic 2-sidcd copying, recirculating document handler, 5-way paper feed, 

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Sunrise Business Mart 
39 North Ave. 
Antloch, IL 60002 



(708) 395-6300 



mifa 



tUtHOH'/IOOKirA 



Fuller 
O'Brien 

Exterior Paints 



Fuller O'Brien 
Liquid Velvet 

Interior Paints 

OliVSALE 



mmi 



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Color 
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Decorating Center 

367-7190 



For all your professhnafdecontlng needs call Color Comer Decorating Center. 

207 W, Peterson Ave., Libertyville 




m 



CriHnu QAnlAmb«r4. 1992 



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Theis finds inventors need wide skills variety 




Peter Theis 

by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

When youngsters begin to make career 
choices, firemen, policeman or maybe 
doctor are the traditional choices. 

Invcntor-manufacturcr-lawyer as one po- 
sition may not be frequently mentioned, 
biut a Gumce inventor has been managing 
diose duties for the last diree decades. 

Peter Theis is devoting lime to protect 
the use and users of his innovations by 
licensing his technologies. These 



technologies have resulted in 16 patents 
and 10 more are in application stages. 

"I got started in the patenting business 
because I was in the business. I saw a 
need, once I developed that need, was a 
need to start marketing the need. Nobody 
understands a new idea. When it becomes 
commonplace, it becomes obvious," 
Theis, founder and president of Theis Re- 
search, Inc., said. 

Theis's technologies have included the 
processes which have spurred the research 
and development for automated voice 
processing including some related to 
voice mail, automated attendant, transac- 
tion processing, audlotex, speed recogni- 
tion and automatic call disU'ibution. 

Theis invented the equipment to auto- 
matically process calls two decades ago. 
Also, Theis technologies have helped de- 
velop early telephone answering machine 
use of question and answer rather than 
typical answering early customer- 
premises multiple broadcasting from a 
central office and early use of portable 
computers to measure telephone trafOc 
patterns. 

Companies using Theis technology in- 
clude Hersey's through Conversational 
Technologies Corp. 

Theis said rarely do inventors sit down 
at 9 a.m. at a desk and have a list of in- 
ventions. "When you are least thinking 
about solving a problem, that is when the 
solution will come " he said. 

"There is no school you go to to show 



how you develop your idea. You've got to 
become almost a patent lawyer to get a 
patent, you've got to be a financier to 
have someone finance you, you've got to 
be a manufacturer-salesman to develop it. 
Then you have to be a litigator to protect 
that patent. 

"In today's world, the person who in- 
vents a new concept has to be a jack of 
all trades," he said. 

This can be doubly lough for the inven- 
tor with another job. 

Depending on the technology, the turn- 
round is not overnight 

"If it is a truly pioneering application 
for a patent, many times patent would 
have expired before it comes into com- 
mon usage. There is a good 20 years be- 
tween concept of a coffee cup and the 
concept appears on shelves. But if it is 
incremental technology — you have a 
smaller cassette tape you could see it in a 
couple of years, but the technology may 
be obsolete in a couple of years so it may 
have a short life span. It can range the 
whole gamut," Theis said. 

For example, the voice mail patents 
were issued in 1972, it started becoming 
common placed in the 1980s. "It is just 
now reaching its sU-ide," Theis said. 
Theis has gone up against the status 
quo in American economy which puts 
large corporations and the United States 
government in dominating patent posi- 
tions. His firm is in a court battle with 
Ameritcch over patent infringement 



In April, Amcritech brought suit 
through a supplier in California lo declare 
the patents invalid. 

"We used to bo very open with our new 
ideas. We relied on the fact that patents 
would protect us. We now recognize there 
are some major corporations that do not 
respect patent rights. The small guy has a 
rough go of it in a big money game. 

"If major corporations do not respect the 
intellectual property rights of others, and 
if Uiere is not a funding source for the 
snriall business and independent inventor, 
it is a very tough road to hoe," Theis 
said. 

The U.S. government, through the bid- 
ding process, is the biggest infringer, 
Theis said. "They invite people to in- 
fringe. If we bring a new idea to the U.S. 
government, they will try it, say 'this is 
great', and then the lowest competitor 
comes in. You can't sue the government 
and get your money back. You have to 
sue the person who supplied the equip- 
ment. You've done all the research and 
development, all the promotion for the 
government, they bring someone else in 
and then you are expected to bring suit for 
$1 million against the guy they brought 
the big business lo. You can't win. The 
U.S. government for a small business- 
man or independent inventor is a losc-lose 
situation," Theis said. 

An international firm will buy the tech- 
nology, and the American companies 
must face then an international group. 



Four local credit unions on Illinois* Top 100 list 



Four area credit union are listed on 
Illinois' Top 100 Credit Union List for 
1991. They are: Great Lakes CU, Great 
Lakes, with $203.5 million in assets; 
Consumers Co-operative CU, Waukegan, 
with $100.9 million; Abbott Laboratories 
ECU, Gumec, $48.8 million; and Warren 
Newport CU, Gumee, $35.4 million. 

Great Lakes CU, which serves 78301 
members, is also in Illinois' Top 10 list, 
ranking fourth in the state in terms of both 
asset and membership size. Making the 
highest one year jump in terms of asset 
size throughout the entire state was Abbott 
Laboratories ECU, which moved from 
55th place at year end 1990 with $26.5 
million in assets to its current 32nd 
ranking today — an increase in assets of 84 
percent. 

"Despite the recession, credit unions in 
Illinois and nationwide are doing well," 
says Dan Plauda, president/chief 
operating officer, of the Illinois Credit 
Union System. "Loan delinquencies arc 
down, net income is running steady and 
reserves are up slighUy." The ICU System 
is the primary trade association for Illinois 



credit unions. 

Low loan delinquency is good news 
for credit unions and is another sign of fi- 
nancial strength. According to the 
Economic Research division of die Credit 
Union National Assn., the national 
delinquency rale for credit unions in 1991 
was 1.58 percent Credit unions in Illinois 
fared better ihan the national average widi 
only 1.51 percent of their total loan 
portfolio over 30 days delinquent 

Illinois ended the year with 851 credit 
unions. While Uic number of credit unions '■ 
decreased six percent in 1991, due mainly 
to voluntary mergers, credit union 
membership continued to grow. Today 
Illinois has 2.32 million members, 
compared to 62.4 million members 
nationwide from 13,977 credit unions. 

Heading ihc list of Illinois' Top 10 
Credit Unions in 1991 was United Air 
Lines ECU. headquartered in Ariington 
Heights, with over $2 billion in assets. 
United Air Lines ECU is also one of the 
top three credit unions in the nation. In the 
number two spot is Construction 



Equipment FCU, Peoria, with over $782 
million in assets, which placed them in the 
top 100 list nationwide. 

Number three was Baxter CU, 
Dcerfield, widi $223 million in assets, fol- 
lowed by Great Lakes CU at the Great 
Lakes Navy Training Center, North 
Chicago, widi $203 million. 



Other credit unions and their rankings 
on Illinois Top 10 list are: (5) State Farm 
Illinois FCU, Bloom-ington; (6) LH. 

Mississippi Valley CU^ Moline; (7) Credit 
Union 1, RanlouI; (8) Corporale America 
FCU, Elgin; (9) Selfrcliancc Ukrainian 

FCU, Chicago; and (10) Motorola ECU, 
Schaumburg. 




University of Health Sciences/ 
The Chicago Medical School 




Workshop to focus on 
increasing savings 

Northbrook — Kemper Secu- 
rities, Inc. will host a workshop 
luncheon exploring "How investors 
can increase the power of their 
savings," on Wednesday, Sept. 16 
from noon lo 1:15 p.m. The featured 
speaker is Ann Marie Tolbcrt, senior 
regional vice president of Kemper 
Financial Services, a Chicago-based 
money management firm widi more 
than $67 billion in assets under 
management. John Blanchard and 



Howard Feder, both vice president 
investments of Kemper Securities, 
will host the free public workshop at 
the North Shore Sheraton Hotel, 933 
Skokie Blvd., Northbrook. 

Tolbert will discuss investment 
strategies which can assist investors in 
reducing their lax liability for 1992 
and beyond as well as die advantages 
of utilizing professional money 
managers. She will also discuss die 
high quality alternatives to die current 
low-interest certificates of deposit 

For reservations call Linda Isakson 
at (708)559-3214. 



Lake County's 

UNIVERSITY BASED 

PRIMARY CARE MEDICINE SERVICES 

♦ Family medicine 

♦ Health examinations 

♦ Employment physicals 



•Featured Service- 



DIABETES AND CHOLESTEROt 
SCREENING* 



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physician or make an appointment for you with our Primary 

Care specialists to evaluate your results. 



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North Chicago 



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I atol^amJ U AUICfit^nAr* '}\ 






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Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Personnel 




Top agents 

Century 21 Leech and 
AiBoci. hii named the ccxnpany'i 
top producing agents from Uic 
second quarter of 1992. Those 
between one and two million 
dollars in closed sales include Lcs 
Babington, Merrily Brubaker, 
Brian Guthridgc, Dawn Hagy, 
Marge Harris, Chris Nyholm, and 
Pam Podslawa. Leading the 
coming in closed sales volume is 
Gloria Brda, with over $3,000,000 
in produclicn. 



Ed Siegel 

Ed Siegel of Century 21 
Krcuscr and Seller obtained his 
real estate Broker's License. 
Siegel has been a licensed 
salesperson and multi-million 
dollar producer since 1989. He 
and his wife, Pat and family live in 
the Saddle Hill area of Green 
Oaks. 




Patricia A. Vilches 

Gumcc resident, Patricia A. 
Vilches a has been advanced 
from R.N. to Clinical Nurse Level 
IV at Victory Memorial Hospital. 
Vilches works in surgery and has 
been employed since December 
of 1983. 

Joni Glewicz 

A. rapid increase in 

airollmcni for a free tax school 
has lead to the appointment of Joni 
Glewicz as director of education 
for Jackson Hewitt Tax Service. 
Glewicz will be responsible for 
the coordination, scheduling and 
supervision of the tuition-free 
school This will be her thiitl year 
as general manager for the 
company. Glewicz is a member of 
the National Society of Tax 
Professional and the Independoit 
Accountants Assn. of Illinois. 
Classes begin the week of Sept. 14 
and last 12 weeks. Call (708)740- 
7S0O for class mformaiion. 



Kathleen LeFave 

Kathleen LeFave of Antioch 
has joined the Longaberger Co. 
sale I family it « consultant. Hie 
Longaberger Co. if the largest 

Eroducer of quality hand-woven 
askets in the western 
hemisphere. Ai an independent 
business penon, LeFave is one of 
more than 11,000 associates 
telling Longaberger Baskets® and 
Longaberger Pouery® through 

Krivale ihowingi, usually in the 
ome. 





..V^j8|tN^^^^ 








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Julie Jordan 

Julie Jordan, Wads worth has 
been advanced from R.N. to 
Clinical Nurse Level IV at 
Victory Memorial Hosptial. 
Jordan works in surgery and is 
employed since April of 1979. 



Joe Epifanio 

Realtor, Joe Epifanio has 
recently completed the Stale of 
Illinois Real Estate Brokers 
Course. Epifanio is employed at 
RE/MAX Advantage Realty in 
Antioch and is ranked in the top 
one percent of all Realtors in the 
United Slates. 



Frank Shaw 

Frank Shaw, vice president of 
The Major Agency, Inc. in 
Libcrtyvillc, has been reelected to 
the Independent Insurance Agents 
of Illinois' Board of Directors as 
vice president of Region 15. Shaw 
will act as liaison between the 



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For brochure and on-site inspections, call; 

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STWATEaiCOrrKlS nUtOOCIIOUTAMaiCA 

« 1992, Sheldon Good & Compaiiy 



NOTICE 
TO SELLERS! 

There is still lime lo 
IncluJc your property in llic 
Octotcr ISih Auction. Please cull Tordel^iils, 



UAI and members of the area he 
represents. He will also develop 
membership in his region, 
represent icgional members at the 
IIAI board meetings and submit 
information lo the IIAI officers 
concerning activities of regional 
members. 





Century 21 Kreuser (pictured on right) and Seiler (pictured at ieft) signed new 
long term lease for the 7,500 squre foot main floor of the former First of America 
Bank building in Libertyville. 

Kreuser, Seiler sign new lease 



Larry Sorenson 

Senior vice president, 
director of marketing services, 
Larry Sorenson, of Rollins 
Burdick Hunter Co., has been 
selected to join Saint Mary of 
Nazareth Hospital Center's 
Advisory Board. Sorenson has 
been employed at Rollins Burdick 
Hunter Co. since 1976 and is a 
member of the board of directors. 



Century 21 Kreuser and 
Seller have signed a long 
term lease for the 7,500 

square foot main floor of 
the former First of America 
Bank building at 200 N. 



Ave. 



m 



Milwaukee 
Lit)crtyvillc. 

Seiler and Tom-Krcuser, 



both local Realtors for over 
20 years, became partners in 
January of this year. The 
firm presently has 35 full 

time agents working out of 
two Libertyville offices, 

"We expect to combine our 
offices and enlarge our staff 
to 45-50 over the next two 



years as additional good 
agents become available*" 
Kreuser. 

The well known 
building was purchased in 
June by neighboring SL 
Joseph Church after First of 
America Bank moved lo 
their new facility across the 
street. 




HSR BLOCK INCOME TAX COORSE 



L 



Thousands of people enjoy part-time employment and earn money each year as 
incx)me tax preparers. Many receive their training in the income tax course taught by 
H&R Block. 

Block offers the Income Tax Course starting Sept. 14th. Students choose from 
morning, afternoon, evening, or weekend classes. 

The Income Tax Course teaches the basics of income tax preparation. Students 
receive hands-on experience in preparing individual tax returns, working with increasingly 
complex tax situations as the term progresses. The course is ideal for homemakers, 
retirees, teachers, for anyone who wants to increase his or her tax knowledge. 

Qualified graduates may be offered job interviews with H&R Block but are under no 
obligation to accept employment. 

Registration forms and brochures can be obtained by contacting H&R Block at the 
below listed addresses and calling the telephone numbers listed below. 

ANTIOCH 

388 Lake St. 

Antioch, IL 60002 

(708) 395-6230 



629 W. Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake, IL 60073 

(708) 546-4862 



474 B.W. Liberty St. 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

(708) 526-8877 



Concerned Care For Your Eyes 




Robert L Epstein, M.D 
Director 




The Center /or 



CORRECTIVE 

EYE SURGERY 



We specialize in eye surgery to treat or correct 
eye problems related to age, illness or injury. Our 
patient benefits from the most modern, approved 
surgical techniques avalible, such as: 

•No- stitch cataract surgery and implants 

•Laser surgery for problems related to diabetes, 
glaucoma and other conditions that may cause 
vision impairment or loss 

•Surgery to halt progressive adult nearsightedness 
that may lead to blindness 



Free Transportation • Medicare Assignment Accepted 

ai4 Washington St. 

Inglcslde, IL 60041 

S87-3012 



24 Lak«(and rtowspapori 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



X. 



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1 «• •• •^, •» M-H*- f!trA*>4<'^>'^ 



Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



"WrrSFrT 



Several reasons given to evaluate property 



by ALAN NADOLNA 

The recent passage of 
legislation aimed at trans- 
fers of property has created a 
need for valuations of sev- 
eral kinds. 

Valuations must be de- 
fendable in court, so it is 
important that they are pro- 
vided by an uninvolved third 
party. The valuator should 
be a professional, and able 
to provide support for the 
information contained in the 
formal report. 

Many property owners, 
particularly commercial 
property, are familiar with 
the high costs of appraisals 
- a form of valuation. Hap- 
pily, valuations sufficient 
for transfers of property are 
not nearly as expensive as 
one would expect. The de- 
velopment of small inde- 
pendent valuation firms has 
enabled property owners to 
obtain quality valuations at 
relatively nominal cost. 

The Revenue Recon- 
ciliation Act of 1990 and 



final regulations to Chapter 
14 have focused attention 
on business buy-sell 
agreements. Despite certain 
"safe harbors" available un- 
der the new law, it is 
generally agreed that all 
agreements between family 
members require review and 
that a current valuation of 
business is critical. 

A valuation will estab- 
lish a fair and objective 
price acceptable to the 
owners of the business. It 
will also provide the best 
defense to IRS challenges of 
the value placed on the 
business. 

Businesses often at- 
tempt to determine the 
value of a key employee and 
the impact to the firm of 
the loss of the key em- 
ployee. There is a real po- 
tential loss of earnings, 
goodwill, competitive ad- 
vantage and the overall 
value of the firm. The im- 
pact of the loss of key indi- 
vidual has been acknowl- 



I'LL FIGHTTOR YOUR RIGHTS! 



•Workman's Comp •Criminal 

•Real Estate •Divorce 

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Lindenhurst 

Also Evenings & Weekends by 

Appointment 



Phone:(708)356-6688 

CALL TOLL FREE: 

1.800-841-9759 




NOTICE 



An invitation Is extended to public 
bodies, atiorneys, businesses and private 
citizens to use Lakeland Newspapers for 
convenient publication of LEGAL 
NOTICES required by the state of Illinois. 

3 quick and economical ways: 

• CALL Chris Kenyon 

(708)223-8161 

• FAX (708)223-8810 

• MAIL Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
GrayslakeJL 60030 

Deadline: Tuesday at 1 1 a.m. 
Published Thursday 

We're here fo serve! 



edged by the IRS, and a 
valuations of this issue can 
have important bearing on a 
business' ultimate tax lia- 
bility. 

This Way 
to Wealth 

Unfortunately, divorces 
are still common in our so- 
ciety. Independent valua- 
tions are routinely required 
to determine the fairest dis- 
tribution of marital assets. 

Another form of divorce 
is the breakup of business 
partnerships or divestiture 
of parts of firms. Again 
valuations are required to 
determine the purchase 
price, loan value or other 



financial parameter. 

Everyone considering 
the purchase of a business 
is well advised to utilize an 
independent valuation. This 
can also be of value in ob- 
taining financing for busi- 
ness operations or.purchasc. 

Employee stock owner- 
ship plans are retirement 
plans that are funded with 



employer slock. This plan 
enables employees to obtain 
an ownership interest in the 
company. The contributions 
to this type of plan are de- 
termined by an independent 
valuation of the value of 
shares. 

Editor's note: Alan 
Nadolna is a consul- 



tant to financial ser- 
vice organizations and 
is a financial advisor 
to corporations and 
individuals. Questions 
are invited by writing 
to This Way to Wealth 
in care of this paper 
or 2203B Lakeside 
Dr., Bannockburn, IL 
60015 




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AT OUtEHWOQD^ 



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EqiMlHouiing 

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Lakotand Nowspapttn 25 



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GET "IT" OFF 

YOliR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



I.IPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 11) 

going to have to hire more police officers. I don't think 
it's right Let those people stay in McHenry County 
where they belong; they don't belong in Lake County. 
We have enough propeny here to take care of. I think 
it's a utter mass of confusion for this to be going on, 
and I wish those trustees up there would start thinking 
about those of us who are in Fox Lake and are paying 
our taxes. 

Park district property tax 

Hello; this is Ed Schrocdcr. I am responding to the 
anonymous letter which states that the time has passed 
me by, and I should talk about facts. It was an 
incoherent phone call, and I suspect it was from a park 
board commission member because a plural "we" was 
used. As for the facts, the caller said: "Wc don't levy a 
tax on property owners. " Unbelievable. The caller is in 
another world. My property tax bill shows an amount 
of $152.99 for the Grayslake Community Park District. 
Also, the township assessor reports that the Grayslake 
Community Park District will receive a total tax of 
$401,803.53 this year from the taxpayers. That is a tax 
on the property owners. I am not afraid to take a public 
stand, and I will get off the back of the park district 
when they start to manage money more efficiently. 
Thanks. 

Rude school board member 

HcUo, I'm calling in response to the article concerning 
the Round Lake School District, As a young adult, and 
a fuUire educator of this country, I have attended many 
school board meetings and I am very disgusted with one 
board member in general. Mr. Hubka is a rude and 
belligerent man. No matter what the teachers say, he 
also has to come back with some rude and belligerent 
comment He is the same way with the public. During 
one board meeting, a lady was talking and he really 
interrupted her to lell her the time was up. After that, 
many people stood up and told him she could have their 
doGC time. He only shut up when Dr. Sherman told 
him to be quiet Mr. Hubka has been heard telling other 
people that teachers are the cause of the school disuict's 
problems. I'm sorry to say that the whole board, 
including Mr. Hubka, is the cause of our school 
district's financial problems. If Mr. Hubka were not on 
the board, I strongly believe that the teachers' union and 
the board would have reached an agreement a long time 
ago. Just remember, Mr. Hubka, you were mistakenly 
elected into office by the voters. 

New school needed; vote yes 

Hi, I'm a student at Antioch High School, and I'm a 
junior this year. I would like to tell you how much we 
need a new school. We've been trying to pass a 
referendum, but it's not working. I realize that I don't 
have to pay the taxes that you do, but I hope that you 
realize that I'm not getting the education that you did. 
Isn't high school supposed to be the time to remember? 
Freshman year and sophomore year have not been so 
great. Students are not gcuing the one-on-one education 
needed. One way or another we need money to buy a 
new school. I don't think we should pay $40 for each 
sport, pay $4 to $5 for lunch each day, pay $50 to park 
in the parking lot, not have needed sports equipment 
and, most of all, not have room to walk in the halls and 
room in the commons and cafeteria to eat. People are 
standing in the walkways eating, I wish I could get the 
one-on-one attention from teachers that I need, but when 
teachers have 30 or more students in each class, it's 
hard. I wish that each one of you that voted "no" last 
November would come to our school during school 
hours to see how overcrowded it is. Please think about 
your high school days and how great they were; don't 
ruin the rest of mine by voting "no." Thank you for 
your time. 

Use common sense 

Hello, I'm calling from Antioch in regards to the police 
confiscating the children's bicycles. The reason behind it 
is the parents are to busy or too lazy to educate their 
children on how to ride a bicycle and where to ride a 
bicycle. Maybe the parents would be more content if the 
children, in the process of riding through crowded 
streets, hiirt somebody and were sued and lose 
eveiything they have. Instead of crying, spend a UtUe 
more time with your child-and use a litde common 
sense. Also, we love to play Bingo. I went to the 
Moose the other day and was appalled at the dirtiness 
and darkness of the place. It looks like something out of 
a skid row. Being a Moose member for many years, this 
is the most disappointing one I have ever been to. 
Also, the men and women there just sit and smoke like 
they are in a saloon. I'd advise my Moose brothers and 
members to be a little more conscious of people who 
have health problems and not use the place as a 
smokehouse. If they have something that they want 
smoked, lake it to a butcher shop. Thank you. 




M 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Good service is the answer 

My call is in regard to the Postal Service Continued in 
the Aug. 28 issue-interesting comments by apparently 
a postal woiker. He says that the patrons do not pay for 
the buildings. Who buys the stamps, but the patrons? 
TTiis person is a typical postal worker-people who are 
not aware that the job IS one of customer service and 
that customers DO have a right to demand service that 
they pay for. Lost mail bags, misrouted mail-ihese arc 
common practices, particularly at our wonderful 
Mundelein post office, which is probably one of the 
worst in the country for handling mail efficienUy. 
People do go into Sears and demand service; if they 
don't get it, they walk across the street to Wal-mart 
That's the way America is; it's a capitalistic society. 
Just because the post office has a monopoly doesn't 
mean that they don't have to give good service. I 
demand good service because that's what I pay for when 
I buy a stamp. . So why waste my time with your 



stupid doubletalk about how you don't have to give me 
service, about how my stamps don't pay fon the 
blinding you stand in; the heat that keeps you warm on 
the job; your wonderful, comfortable pension which is 
one of the world's best; and your great medical services 
that keq)s your family healthy. The stamp that I buy is 
your livelihood, and I demand and expect good service. 
And, I should get it-or you should get fired. 

Where's the beach? 

I think somebody should straighten out these real estate 
offices in the Round Lake area. When you buy a house 
in Round Lake, they tell you how beautiful Round Lake 
is, the beach and all this kind of stuff. When you go to 
find the beach, there's no beach, no boat ramp, no 
nothing. Round Lake Beach has a beach and a boat 
ramp, but they won't allow outsiders to use it Round 
Lake Park has a beach and a boat ramp, but you have to 
(Continued on page 50) 



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DOCKERS 



PIZZA PASTA SALAD BAI 








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I 




THURSDAY 
SEPT. XO, 199Z 

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708-973-0033 




26 Lak«land N#wspapws 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



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INDEX 

Graystake High School 2 

Warren Township High School 3 

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Grant Comnriunity High School 5 

Round Lake Senior High School .6 

Wauconda High School -^^"-^ 

Richmond-Burton High School 7 

North Chicago High School 8 

LibertyvJIle High School 8 

Lake Zurich High School 9 

Carmel High School 10 

Adial E. Stevenson High School ...11 

Schedules 12 




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Grayslake ' 


Roster 




Player 


Ht. 


wt. 


CI, 


Pos. 


Jason Lake 


5-11 


159 


11 


QB-DB 


Scotl Schupp 


5-10 


162 


12 


1E.DB 


Brian Andrews 


6-1 


179 


12 


QB-DB 


Greg Kane 


5-9 


178 


12 


RB-DB 


Chris Haley 


5-9 


160 


11 


RB-DB 


Zach Spencer 


5-10 


160 


12 


RB-LB 


Allen Foster 


5-10 


184 


11 


RB-LB 


Bill Gucnthcr 


5-8 


160 


12 


RB-DB 


Ryan Kocnig 


5-8 


151 


11 


RB-DB 


Eric Bcchclli 


5-9 


159 


11 


RB-DB 


John Gonzalez 


5-10 


162 


11 


TE-DB 


Joel Kos 


5-10 


159 


11 


RB-DB 


Alex Ortigosa 


5-9 


168 


12 


RB-LB 


Jason Powell 


6-0 


187 


12 


RB-DE 


Sieve Taylor 


6-0 


180 


12 


TELB 


Done Gryb 


5-8 


155 


12 


RB-LB 


Paul Don- 


5-10 


165 


11 


RB-LB 


Mike Welch 


5-11 


171 


11 


TE.DB 


Rauly Melendcz 


5-10 


155 


12 


G-DE 


Glenn McGary 


5-8 


159 


12 


C-DT 


Mike Poulscn 


6-0 


184 


n 


OT-DT 


Jay Moore 


5-10 


160 


12 


G-DE 


Chris Magiera 


6-3 


240 


12 


OT-DT 


Todd Daniels 


6-0 


185 


12 


C-DE 


Steve Swanson 


6-0 


177 


10 


CfT-DT 


Dan Stransky 


6-1 


168 


11 


C-DE 


Brian Schnabcl 


6-1 


208 


11 


. OT-DT 


Jake Yukna 


6-0 


184 


12 


G-DT 


Greg Rybarczyk 


6-0 


170 


12 


CDT 


Todd Doyle 


6-0 


182 


12 


OT-DT 


John Dcbocr 


6-0 


200 


U 


G-LB 


Paul Kopicrski 


6-1 


172 


12 


TE-DB 


Bob Witt 


6-1 


. 165 


12 


DE-DB 


Ben Rockwell 


6-0 


166 


12 


TC-DB 


Bob Mcnncs 


5-8 


142 


12 


TE-DB 


Jay Horvath 


6-0 


151 


11 


TE-DB 


Mike Spychala 


5-10 


163 


11 


TE-DE 


Nathen Schwenn 


5-8 


149 


U 


TE-DB 


Jan Baczck 


5-10 


200 


11 


G-DT 


Aaron Strain 


6-1 


191 


12 


T&DE 





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Rams have 'uplifting' off-season 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The clanking sound heard at Grayslake Community High 
School Uiis summer was not something breaking down 
needed to be fixed. 

Quite the contrary. Instead, it was, for football coaches, 
the sweet sound of football players lifting weights. Coach 
Bill Johnson and his staff could almost count the inches and 
pounds being added to the Rams with every clank. 

"I tell the kids, if you don't lift weights or are not in foot- 
ball camp, then you start the season at the bottom of the 
depth chart. That does not mean you can't work your way 
up to the top. But wc get a lot of participation," Johnson 
said. 

Those doing Uic bench presses and squats were some fa- 
miliar faces to Grayslake faithful. The good news from last 
year's 2-7 team is 14 returning Ictlcrwinners arc back. 

"It takes longer with 43 kids out lo get the repetitions, but 
this is the first time in 25 years Grayslake has had this 
many letlcrmen back," Johnson said. 

Senior Brian Andrews, at 6-foot- 1, 175 pounds and junior 
Jason Link, are the two top candidates to be starling 
quarterback. "Brian throws the ball belter but Jason can run 
the ball. Jason has improved fundamentally but he still 
needs time to pick up the passing attack. Early in the year, 
wc may very well alternate," Johnson said. 

That especially could be the case for the opener at home 
against Marengo ScpL 4. 

"Wc are three to four deep on the depth chart at every 
position," Johnson said of running backs, 

Zach Spencer, a 5-10, 155 pounder returns, as docs Greg 
Kane. Kane, a 5-9 170 pounder, suffered a broken leg last 
year but is recovering. 

Bill Gucnthcr might well receive the team's heart award. 
He is battling Juvenile Arthritis, akin to Lou Gehrig's dis> 
ease. He played baseball for the Mundelein Legion team 
this summer and is back for another year as running back 
— safety with the Rams. 



"He had some problem with eye and hand coordination 
during baseball season, but the problems people said he 
would experience have not happened," Johnson said- 
Ben Rockwell, out for the first time for football and Jay 
Horvath give the Rams something which fans may not be 
used to — speed from the wide receiver position. Horvath 
runs a 4.8 40-yard dash while Rockwell has been clocked at 
4.6. 

All-Northwest Suburban Conference player senior Steve 
Taylor, 5-11, 160, is back at tight end. 

Several linemen are also back. They include seniors: cen- 
ter-defensive end Todd Daniels at 5-9, 175; tackle -defensive 
end Jay Moore al 5-10, 150; guard-defensive end Raulcy 
Mclcndez at 5-7, 145; the biggest Ram, 6-3, 250 tackle 
Chris Magiera; guard-linebacker Eric Perham at 5-5, 140; 
center-defensive tackle Bill Harrigan; tackles Jacob Yukna, 
5-10, 175; Todd Doyle. 5-11, 172; Mike Becker, 6-2, 215; 
Mike Willie Smith, 6-0, 140; and Bob WitU 6-1, 155. 

The Rams had a strong first week of practice. On offense, 
three of the seven scries are in with about half the defense 
explained. 

The pre-conference season includes Fox Valley Conference 
powerhouse Crystal Lake Central, which humiliated the 
Rams last year, Sept. 11, Marmion Sept. 18 and Whcaton 
St, Francis Sept. 26, 

"I think we can go 3-1. If we are 3-1, wc will be in the' 
playoffs another year. If wc are 2-2. it could be a struggle," 
Johnson said. 

The Rams are looking to recapture that talent which 
guided them to the palyoffs two straight years before last 
year's struggle. 

"I've been very proud of the kids. There has been a 
tremendous amount of effort. If effort wins games, we'd be 
champions, but you still have to play the game," Johnson 
said. 

As for this year's conference race, the fourth-year coach 
sees defending champ Wauconda as the early favorite. 




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AREA HIGH SCHOOL TEAMS 



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Friday, S«pr«mber4. 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 2B 



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Warren hopes '92 another vintage year for football 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

The last time Wanen Township High School football fans 
saw Mark Leginski take a snap from center, it was in a key 
moment in a Class 5 A football game against Deerfield. 

Starting quarterback Craig Shelton had been shaken up on 
a second-quarter play, meaning Leginski had to come in. 
Leginski kept the team together and the Blue Devils went 
on to win 19-13 and advance to the state quarterfinals. 

If anyone needed any reminder of the great moments the 
1991 season produced: the win over Stevenson in the snow, 
the playoff wins over Belvidere and Deerfield for a 10-2 
record, the throwing of Shelton, the running of Bob Olson 
and the pass catching of Jeremy Wilmot, all one has to do 
is catch Coach Reggie Hughes on a day when he is proudly 
wearing a state quarterflnalist T-shirt 

"It carries over wiUi the enthusiasm of the whole team," 
Hughes said as practice continued. 

The Warren mentor, entering his seventh season as head 
coach and 21st at the school, feels this year's bunch is 
striving to achieve its own identity as it prepares for the 
Sept 4 opener at Fenton. 



"I have a lot of memorabilia from last year, both on and 
off the field. It was a great accomplishment for both the 
school and the community. Last year we re-established 
football at Warren," Hughes said. 

''But this is I992t'* he quickly adds. He has confidence the 
same feelings 1991 brought can be recaptured, but Warren 
faithful may see a different attack. 

"Last year, because of the type of talent we had, we were 
able to throw the ball two-thirds of the time and run it for 
one-third," Hughes said. "Now. we may throw one-third and 
run two-thirds." 

Leginski, with the above noted exception of the Deerfield 
game, did not see many pressure situations as he watched 
Shelton work his passing magic. 

"He learned a lot of things and was able to focus and visu- 
alize," Hughes said of the 5-foot-9 inch. 150-pound Legin- 
ski. 

The backfleld candidates figure to be senior Bob Olson, 
junior Tim Marabella. 6-1. 195. Marabella was the leading 
rusher on the sophomore squad last year. Junior Clint Jack- 
son and Jamie Marineau. 

Ryan Taylor, a 6-1, 170-pound senior, also returns. '*He is 











Warren Roster 










Player 


Ht. 


Wt. 


CI. 


Pos. 












Brandon Schild 


6-5 


242 


12 


TE-DT 


Dusan Rscic 


6-2 


192 


12 


OT-DT 


Bob Olson 


5-10 


195 


12 


RB-DL 


Dan Simmel 


6-1 


190 


12 


C-DL 


Quentin Jackson 


6-0 


170 


11 


RB-DE 


Greg Herlihy 


6-1 


195 


12 


G-LB 


Andy Strahan 


5-10 


160 


11 


WB-S 


EricKowalke 


5-11 


172 


11 


G-DL 


EdDcMcyer 


5-7 


143 


11 


^VB-DB 


Tom Streicher 


5-5 


177 


12 


CfT-DT 


Tony Largo 


5-10 


162 


11 


CB-DB 


Paul Burkitt 


5-9 


171 


11 


aDL 


Pete Baxbosa 


5-4 


120 


11 


^ B-DB 


Ivan Najano 


5-7 


182 


11 


G-DL 


Maik Leginski 


5-9 


165 


12 


jB-FS 


Matt Werhane 


5-8 


205 


12 


G-DL 


Tim Marabella 


6-0 


190 


11 


RB-LB 


Sean Smith 


5-8 


175 


12 


G-DL 


Ryan Taylor 


6-0 


170 


12 


WB-DB 


Carl Lewis 


5-11 


189 


11 


G-DL 


Curt Vogel 


5-9 


145 


11 


QB-DB 


Matt Wilkins 


6-2 


205 


11 


or-DT 


Jeff Hood 


5-11 


165 


12 


WB-DB 


Dan Tate 


5-10 


236 


11 


or-DT 


Ron Larsen 


5-8 


155 


12 


WB-DB 


Mike Mauritz 


6-3 


254 


12 


or-ur 


Marshall MuUin 


5-6 


140 


11 


WB-DB 


Scou Bjorkman 


6-1 


198 


11 


or-DT 


Dave McLellen 


5-7 


155 


11 


WB-SS 


Malt Wallace 


5-10 


186 


11 


or-DT 


Mike Swiscz 


5-8 


180 


12 


WB-SS 


Damone De Vaughn 


6-2 


205 


11 


or-DT 


Jamie Marienau 


5-8 


180 


12 


RB-DL 


Andy Akyol 


6-3 


222 


12 


or-DT 


Eric McCauley 


6-0 


180 


11 


RB-LB 


Jake Reichert 


6-3 


255 


11 


or-DL 


Jason Bergren 


5-4 


145 


11 


RB-DB 


Don Friedlund 


5-7 


174 


11 


•re-DE 


John Losch 


5-11 


160 


11 


WB-DB 


Matt Foul 


6-5 


190 


12 


E-DE 


Malloiy Baker 


5-9 


165 


12 


RB-DB 


MikeNaden 


6-0 


173 


11 


IBDB 


Gary Weir 


5-7 


166 


11 


RB-LB 


Bill Bensinger 


6-0 


175 


11 


TE-DE 


Rob Idstein 


5-10 


157 


12 


RB-LB 


Mark Sabor 


5,11 


175 


11 


TE-LB 


Russ Leafblad 


6-0 


154 


11 


TE-DE 


Josh Kegg 


6-1 


185 


12 


&DE 



an excellent wide receiver, but he may see some time at 
quarteiback. He has a great arm." Hughes said. 

Brandon Schild, an all-conference pick last year, returns at 
tight end. 

Hughes believes the offensive line is bigger than in previ- 
ous years. Jake Reichert is a 6-3, 250-pound tackle while 
Dugan Rucic is 6-2, 185. Andy Aykol, a transfer from • 
Round Lake, checks in at 6-3^ 220. 

While Olson will handle the punting, the field-goal kick- 
ing is up for gr^s. 

Antioch has 
cleats to fill 

by THOMAS STEVENS 

Lakeland Newspapers 

With the recent success of the Antioch Sequoit football 
squad, a 6-3 regular-season record and a trip to the Class 5 A 
state playoffs, Head Coach Del Pechauer hopes this year's 
team has gained some experience from last year's playoff 
appearence. 

"The seniors, we have now, have learned from the playoff 
exposure we had last year." said Pechauer. "We will try to 
get back (to the playoffs).** 

But that maybe easier said than done. With the loss of 
Antioch standouts Tim and Tom Lehn to graduation, and 
stronger competition within the North Suburban Confer- 
ence, the Sequoits have their work cut out for them when 
they travel to Libertyville Saturday, SepL 5 for the season 
opener. 

"We will be a middle of the pack team up this year," said 
Pechauer. "But, you never know what will happen until the 
season starts." 

Not knowing is exactly what Pechauer means when he 
talks about this year's team, which will have several ques- 
tion marks at key positions when the season begins. 

For openers, the team is still searching for a starting 
quarterback io lead the Sequoit offense. Leadership could 
come from Senior Eric Newcomb if he wins the job. If not. 
then Junior Casey O'Connell will call the plays for Anti- 
och. 

Other offensive contibuters, according to Pechauer, will 
be running backs Rick Leukhardt. a junior, and Larry Janke. 
(Continued ob Page 4) 



% 



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CENTER 

17801 W. Washington St. 

Gurnee, ILL. 60031 

(708)244-1101 

•Robert Depke, Supervisor 
•Joe Dada, Assessor 
•Frank Thonnas, Highway 
Comnnissioner 
•Jim Sammon, Town Clerk 
•Shirley Goetz, Jim Flood, Joseph 

Schaberger, Dave Brown, Trustees 




(papers 2B 



3B Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday. S«plftmbor 4, 1992 



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Antioch 



(Continued from Page 3) 

a senior. 

In addition to the quarterbxk question, Pechauer is still 
looking for a leader on the defensive side of the football. 

"We are looking for a leader to step up and take charge- 
said Pechauer. "Things are looking better on defense." 

This leadership could come from comerback Janke, or se- 
nior linebacker Dave Remter, "The defense has gotten better 



as camp has progressed," said Pechauer. "We had to call off 
the dogs during one practice last week. We axe ready to 
play." 

Overall though, Pechauer expects his team to be 
competitive despite his team's question marks and tough 
schedule, which includes battles with Lake Forest, Warren 
and Zion-Bcnton. 

"It is going to be an exciting year for Antioch," said 
Pechauer. 



Antioch Roster 



Player 


Ht. 


Wt. 


CI. 


Pos. 


Tony Kucharsid 


5-11 


151 


11 


RB 


Louis Oplawski 


5-10 


136 


11 


DB 


Gerry Crasser 


5-7 


146 


12 


RB 


ScoU Sytsma 


5-7 


140 


12 


LB 


Dave Kowalewski 


5-10 


193 


12 


K-DE 


Lane SunuiiEre 


5-10 


144 


11 


CE 


Shane Anton 


6-3 


191 


11 


DE 


Dave RemLcT 


6-3 


250 


12 


FB-LB 


Brian Hribar 


5-7 


135 


11 


DB 


Mike Gedville 


6-1 


165 


11 


E 


Eric Newcomb 


6-2 


196 


12 


QB-E 


Casey O'Conncll 


6-2 


172 


11 


QB-E 


Jon Smith 


5-8 


146 


11 


RB 


Mike Stephenson 


6-1 


158 


11 


RB 


Shane Schneider 


5-10 


156 


12 


LB 


Bob ScToggin 


5-9 


151 


11 


DB 


Eric Pompeo 


6-0 


137 


12 


DB 


ScoU English 


5-6 


128 


11 


DB 


JlmDawe 


5-9 


128 


11 


RB 


Joe Dvorak 


6-0 


166 


12 


LB 


Joe Lof fredo 


5-9 


144 


11 


DB 


Mike Shea 


6-1 


220 


11 


FB-DE 


Rick Leukhardt 


5-11 


166 


11 


RB-DB 


Mart Eichhom 


5-11 


148 


11 


DB 


Dave Schran 


5-8 


142 


11 


DB 


Rich Weber 


5-7 


136 


n 


RB 


Kent Ipsen 


5-10 


161 


11 


FB 


Jim Chassercau 


6-5 


168 


12 


DB 


Larry Janke 


5-11 


170 


12 


RB-DB 


Gaiy Oilschlager 


6-2 


200 


12 


m 


Jim Miller 


5-9 


174 


11 


LB 


Kevin Bracey 


6-1 


193 


11 


LB 


Kevin Shechan 


6-3 


221 


12 


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Angelo Roncone 


6-0 


185 


12 


C 


Alan O'Brien 


6-1 


184 


11 


LB 


Rob Stone 


6-0 


252 


11 


DT 


Jim Elfering 


6-2 


210 


12 


DT 


Tony Gardln 


6-1 


149 


11 


LB 


Kevin Spiegl 


5-11 


157 


11 


DE 


Chris Kabel 


5-11 


196 


11 


C 


Bruce Boiys 


6-3 


265 


12 


or 


Don Knigge 


5-10 


245 


12 


or 


Derek Lang 


6-3 


184 


11 


DE 


Eric Senica 


6-1 


212 


11 


or 


Jason Shechan 


6-2 


191 


12 


G 


Chris Hall 


6-1 


220 


11 


G 


Chris Modra 


5-10 


163 


11 


C 


John Osmond 


5-10 


169 


11 


LB 


CJ. Granbcrg 


5-10 


237 


12 


or 


Chris Zaccagnini 


5-10 


188 


11 


G 


Rick Rojas 


6-0 


233 


12 


G 


Tom Gust 


5-10 


237 


11 


DE 


Kevin Dcnzcl 


5-9 


193 


11 


C-DT 


Chris Haag 


6-1 


212 


11 


or 


Jason GifTord 


6-2 


214 


11 


DT 


Bill Kilimnik 


6-2 


239 


12 


or 


Jeff Fisher 


6-1 


200 


12 


or 


Morgan Connard 


6-0 


160 


12 


E 


Lon Grohs 


5-10 


188 


12 


IB 


Howie Lord 


5-9 


165 


12 


E 


JeCfKehrer 


6-0 


155 


12 


E 


Tom Furlan 


6-2 


169 


11 


E 


Sean Noland 


6-6 


165 


11 


E 


Phil Zinkowich 


5-7 


127 


12 


E 


Dan Newcomb 


6-3 


175 


10 


E-DB 


John Tomany 


5-U 


144 


12 


E 





Mustangs won't 
be taken lightly 

by STEVE PETERSON 

LakeUnd Newspapers 

Football games are, indeed, won in the trenches and 
Mundelein Coach Mike Egan believes his forces will have a 
chance to survive that battle this year. 

Keying that effoit are returning tackles Willie Koiman, a 
6-foot-l-inch 260-pounder and Bill Logan &4, 280. 

Logan brushed up on his skills while attending a linemen 
camp at the University of Michigan this summer. 

"We do have some size in the line," Egan said of one of 
his team's strengths. 

In addition to Logan and Norman, topping the 200-pound 
maik arc Andrew Schroeder, a 6-1, 220-pound senior, and 
Scott Wahlert (6-0, 200) and Scou Zupanic (6-3, 260). 

Back Crom a knee injury is John Caldero, a 6-1, 185-pound 
offensive lineman and linebacker. 

Tim Akins had a baptism of fue as he quartcibacked the 0- 
9 Mundelein U:am of last year. 

"He has improve a lot cmi his throwing. He has gained a 
lot of confidence and matured a year. He knows what is ex- 
pected of him," Egan said. 

Senior Dennis Howell is back at a running back spot 
along with junior Shawn Hamilton, senior Steve Fuller, 
juniors Ethan Karolcz^ and Sieve Schueler. 

Schueler (5-10, 165) will also handling extra points and 
kickoffs for Mundelein, an infrequent occunence last year. 

"It was tough on us all. The motivation comes from the 
year of experience. They can't do any worse than last year. I 
like these kids. They've worked hard in the off-season. I feci 
confident going to battle with them," Egan, 1-17 in two 
years at Mundelein, said as his team entered the fmal week 
before the Saturday, Sept 5 opener at Zion-Bcnton. 

As for the North Suburban Conference, Egan sees two 
teams as cuts above the rest 

"Warren and Lake Forest," Egan predicted. 

And with some bigger players battling in the line, the 
Mustangs could be ready to get that old monkey off its 
back. 




Best of Luck for a Winning Seasont 

STATE BANK OF AIVTIOCII 

440 Lake St. 

Antioch, IL 

(708)395-2700 

LIMIEMIURST FACILITY 

2031 E. Grand Ave. 

LIndenhurst, IL 

(708)356-5700 







STRANG 
FUNERAL HOME 

1055 South Main Street 

Antioch, Illinois 

(708) SSS'^OOO 

Dan Dugenske, Director 




Good Luck to All the Teams! 

Biller Press 

966 Victoria • Antioch. IL 

(708) 395-41 1 1 (708) 395-1 203 

(FAX) 708-395-4232 

Fastf Affordable, Quality Printing 




YOa CAN COUNT ON . 
OUR SaPPORTI 

City of North Chicago 

1850 Lewis Avenue 

North Chicago, IL 

(708) 578-7778 

- Mayor — 

Bobby E. Thompson 
& The City Council 

- City Clerk — 

Tim Miller 

— City Treasurer — 

Dan Pacenti 




Friday, Soptttmb«r4. 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 4B 



Mk 



l |# IW II- - — 






I^>^ 



.V-f-- 



n't 



nches and 
will have a 

Norman, a 

a 

a linemen 

i of one of 

200-pound 
ienior, and 
260). 

185-pound 
:kcd the 0- 

is gained a 
what is ex- 
back spot 
JVC Fuller, 

points and 
last year. 

s from the 
last year. I 
ason. I feci 
■17 in two 
final week 
)n. 

1 sees two 



e line, the 
key off its 






papers 4B 




Mundelein Roster 




PUyer 


Ht. 


Wt, 


CI. 


Fob. 


Dennis Howell 


5-6 


170 


12 


RB^HB 


TtmAkiiu 


6-0 


170 


11 


QB-DB 


Shawn Hamilton 


5-9 


160 


11 


WR-DB 


Steve Fuller 


5-8 


140 


12 


WR-DB 


BJ. Johnson 


5-10 


170 


10 


RB-LB 


Ethan Kaiolczak 


6-1 


170 


U 


WR-DB 


Steve Scheueler 


5-10 


150 


11 


RB-DB 


Ky Walker 


6-3 


190 


12 


RB-DL 


Andy Maiin 


5-8 


150 


11 


RB-LB 


Scott Wahlert 


6-0 


200 


12 


RB-LB 


Wade Arnold 


5-9 


175 


11 


RB-DB 


Charles Smith 


6-0 


160 


11 


GLA3L 


Josh Ravenscraft 


6-0 


225 


12 


OLDL 


Sergio Garza 


5-10 


190 


11 


OUDL 


Willie Norman 


6-1 


260 


12 


OLrDL 


Andrew Schroeder 


6.1 


220 


12 


OLrDL 


Bill Logan 


6-4 


280 


12 


OLDL 


Jefif Manisich 


6-a 


185 


11 


OLrDL 


John Calderaio 


6-1 


185 


12 


OL-LB 


Scott Zupancic 


6-3 


260 


11 


OLrDL 


Doug Hcaly 


6-^ 


190 


l6 


WR-DL 


Colin Marsh 


6-1 


170 


12 


WR-DB 


Tom Calvin 


5-10 


170 


12 


WR-DL 



Grant has new coach, outlook 



by GREG MILLER 
Lakeland Newspapers 

"Back to the Future" is a mtist-see for this yeai^s Grant 
football players. Not the movie — the attitude. 

First-year Bulldog head coach Mark Barczak wants his 
team to regain some of the glory that was Grant and build 
on it this season. 

"We're letting the kids know there is pride to be had 
playing at Grantt" Barczak said. "We want the kids to be 
proud to wear the red and white." 

Grant has just three starters — seniors Bob Gerstner, 
Rich Justus and Rob Medine — back from the team that 
went winless last season. The good news is the Bulldogs' 
33-man roster includes 20 junicHS. Last year, Barczak guided 
the sophomore team to a 6-2-1 mark. 

"We're telling our seniors that we're a young team, but 
we're not playing for next season. We want to win righi 
now," Barczak said. 

"No. 1, I want the kids to be fundamentally sound. 
That's so vital. The first three days of practice, we worked 
on blocking and tackling. We can't put in a Bill Walsh of- 



Grant Roster 



Player 

TimCulotta 
Scou Finch 
Bob C3er8tner 
Rich Justus 
Jason Kunde 
Edgar Lcnze 
Tony Mauch 
Rob Medine 
Lou Notriano 
Ben Robinson 
Nick Spadaro 
Mike Ward 
Bret Bending 
Rob Bowman 
Aaron Butler 
Dan Colin 



Shawn Divoky 
Rich Egan 
Chris Falster 
Scou Goodale 
George Heinz 
Chris Horsfell 
Greg Jarr 
NateLaurell 
Shawn Powers 
Brandon Rajajczylc 
Bill Richards 
Rob Rinkenberger 
Jeff Rodriguez 
Mark Schweiss 
Tom Usrcy 
Matt Warmowski 
Dave JaksUus 



fense." 

What the offense will attempt to do is use balance to 
keep opponents oCT-balance. 

"We'll vary our attack and run a balanced offense," Bar- 
czak said. "Well keep it balanced and keep the defense away 
from its comfort zone. Well use a deuce, a Utile bit of I and 
a lot of motion. We'll make the defense rotate and adjust to 
us." 

Junior Shawn Powers (6-foot-l, 195 pounds) is set to 
start at quarterback. 

Senior Mike Ward, a transfer from Richmond, and ju- 
nior Aaron Butler are getting long looks at tailback. Senior 
Lou Notriano and junior Bret Bending are vying at fullback, 
while junior Scou Goodale will be at flanker or in the slot 

Senior Tim Culotia (6-3, 215) and junior Bill Richards 
(6-4, 225) are battling for the tight end spot. 

Culotta could play split end, where classmate Nick 
Spadaro has been looking good. 

The offensive tackles will probably be juniors Tom Us- 
rey and Rich Egan. Three juniors — MaU Warmowski, 
Nate Laurell and George Heinz — will see a lot action at 
guard, while Justus and junior Rob Bowman are working 
out at center. i 

Barczak said Bending (linebacker) and Butler (strong 
safety) sq^pear to be the defensive leaders at this stage. 

Culotta, Laurell, Notriano, Heinz, Richards, Egan, se- 
nior Jason Kunde and junior Chris Horsfell will sec defen- 
sive line duty. Gerstner, Justus and Warmowski are being 
molded into nose tackles. 

Good bets to join Bender at linebacker are Medine and 
juniois Maik Schweiss and Rob Rinkenberger. 

Barczak said after Butler, the defensive backfield is wide 
open. Candidates include seniors Ben Robinson, Edgar 
Lentz and Ward and juniors Dan Colin, Shawn Divoky and 
Goodale and Dave Jakstas — the only sophomore on the 
varsity. 

Notriano and Jakstas are possible punters, while junior 
Greg Jarr may handle the kicldng chores. 








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IWISHING YOU A WINNING SEASON! 
GROSSMAN PLUMBING 

5 Meade Court Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-7012 

Ron Hill-Owner 



MMMiHWtMim 



"The best of luck for a winning season!" 

Sandy MeKie 
and Sons 

91 South Route 12 
Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-6473 




tTAIt rAtM 



IHlUlkHCI 



STATE FARM 
INSURANCE 



AGBNT - BOB MISIEK 

29 East Grand Ave. 
Fox Lake, illinois 

(708) 587-7202 



SB Lakeland Newspapers 



Fflday. Seplomber A, 1992 



m 



. ■.^S!'?!?S^^?B5****wycii«- 



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Champs Wauconda hope road to repeat is smooth 



bv DAN BERNARD sity action last year. play in the championship season past 

Lakeland NewsDaDers "0"^ strength is that we have some experienced people Three of last year's stars did not return, however, leaving 

Wauconda High School Head Football Coach Bob Kasper conr.ing back on both sides of the game, offensively and three big holes to fiU. Graduates John Sanew. a slotback 

wants everything to go smoothly this year forlhe defending defensively." Ka^ said. tackle Bnan Hluchy and wideoutCJ^^^^^^ 

champs of the Northwest Suburban Conference. Smooth as Among the potential stars m the retumuig crop are quar- all-conference ranked. And they hftcd the team not only in 

an Illinois prairie terback Byron Johnson, who "proved last year that he could scoring but in morale, Kasper said. 

"People are going to be coming to play us now," Kasper lead the team."* Kasper said. Running back Randy Brill "TTiose three playeis were the catalysts of our team last 

said "The key for us is going to be don't get caught in any made aU-confcrence last year, while fuUback Kevin Cajda year," Kasper said. Whatever players wiU lake thcu- place as 

peaks or vaUeys. If we win first game, then okay, we go on had a great season of his own. the team's psychological boosters will emerge as the season 

and play the second one. If we lose our first game, okay, Dan Ritchie returns at center, having also taken all-con- progresses, he said. 

we go on and play our second fcrence honors last year. Also back arc guards Trey Bennett In the size of its players, the Bulldogs are not huge but 

"If the kids are able to keep focused and take each game and Ben Seelye and offensive tackle Nate Bowers. arc weU-sized for the conference. Wauconda's biggest assets 

one at a time we should do all right" "We're hoping their leadership will carry us again." are tackle Brad Gross at 285 pounds; junior Tim Randall, 

Although Kasper avoided any opUmistic predicUons as Kasper said. offensive and defensive tackle, at 250; Bowers, 230; 

the season began, the Bulldogs have good reason to feel The Bulldogs' running attack is formed by the core of Ritchie, 220; and Bennett, 205. 

confidenu TTiis year's squad includes a hefty number of re- Brill, Cajda and Johnson along with running back Corey The coaches won't jinx the season by predicting a repeat 

turning seniors — 19, a big deal for a small school like Kazimour, a junior, who nonetheless got quality field time tide. But they will repeal one winning factor from last 

Wauconda — as well as a handful of juniors who saw var- last year. With the different talents of those big four, "We yean the team theme. 

feel like we have a very balanced running attack." Kasper "Our saying for this year is, Tf it's good for the team, us 

said. "Any one of those guys is capable of being all- good for me,' " Kasper said "We don't rely on one person 

conference for us." or gear our offense around one person." 

Rounding out the returning power arc wideouts Brian Wauconda's road to a repeat title begins Friday, SepL 4 at 

Kuzniar and Chris Merkncr, both of whom saw plenty of home against Gary-Grove. 



Wauconda Roster 

Player Ht. Wt. CI. 

Cory Kazimour 6-0 162 11 

Chris Knnzlcr 5-9 160 12 

Mariano Rosado S-6 150 12 



Pes. 

QB-HB-LB 
SE-DB 
SE-DB 



Byron Johnson 


6-0 


160 


12 


QB-S 


Pcie Cebulka 


5-10 


160 


11 


FB-DE 


Randy Brill 


5-8 


170 


12 


HB-DB 


Brian Kuzniar 


5-9 


130 


12 


SE-DB 


Jeff Matkovich 


5-7 


155 


12 


HB-DB 


Willi Kocncmann 


6-1 


150 


12 


HB-DB 


Jeremy Syrocki 


5-10 


155 


12 


HB-DB 


Kevin Cajda 


5-9 


170 


11 


FB-LB 


Scou Space 


5-9 


150 


12 


SE-DE 


Jeremy Mers 


5-11 


150 


11 


HB-DB 


Bradcn Cheshier 


5-8 


140 


11 


SE-DB 


Jim Solomon 


6-4 


210 


12 


G-DE 


Trey Bennett 


5-10 


205 


12 


G-LB 


Grant Schmidt 


6-0 


205 


12 


OT-DE 


Dan Ritchie 


6-0 


220 


12 


C-DE 


Adam Vorcek 


5-10 


165 


11 


G-DE 


Tim Rigsby 


5-10 


160 


11 


G-crr 


Ben Seelye 


5-10 


200 


12 


G-LB 


Scott Evol 


5-8 


160 


12 


G-OT 


Jason Opsed 


5-11 


185 


11 


C-NT 


Abe Fronizak 


5-9 


200 


12 


ar-DT 


Nate Bowers 


6-1 


230 


12 


CfT-DT 


Chris Lundslcn 


6-2 


200 


11 


OT-DE 


Tim Randall 


6-2 


250 


11 


OT-DT 


Chris Mcrkner 


6-2 


170 


12 


SE-DB 


MaU Miller 


5-3 


105 


n 


SE-DB 


Tony HincG 


5-9 


140 


12 


SE-DB 


Chris Pfeiffcr 


5-9 


140 


U 


SE-DB 


Brad Gross 


6-3, 


285 


12 


or-DT 



Rodriguez set to lead RL offense 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

There is good news and not-so-good news for Round Lake 
football fans when they watch their team with the the ball. 

The good news is a talented group of experienced running 
backs and quarteiback Clint Rodriquez. 

The possible weakness is the people who will be doing 
the blocking. "We have a very inexperienced offensive line. 
But Clint is an excellent quarterback and he always gives 
you a chance to win," Round Lake coach Mike Dunn said 

Rodriquez is also a standout baseball player at Round 
Lake, playing center fleld. He batted leadoff for the Legion 
team this summer. 

"Preparing for football season is a lot more intense," Ro- 
driquez s^d 

Rodriquez has been playing baseball since he was 5 years 
old. He looks back with pride to two years ago when the 
Round Lake Colt learn advanced to the national regionals. 

"Toughness is an Attibide" is the theme for the Panthei^ 
this pre-season. Round Lake opens the season with a home 
game against McHenry Friday, SepL 4. 

Hope abounds during two-a-days and when everyone is 0- 
0. Rodriquez is confident the Panthers can return to the 



level of success of their 1990 playoff team. 

"We have three real good backs who know how to run it," 
he said of the option. 

The senior-dominated running back corp includes Vinnie 
Lira at 5-foot-9 and 165 pounds; Harry Gibson at 5-9, 165, 
Jason Morse at 5-9 160 and yet another Tesch, Luke, at 6- 
0, 210. 

Round Lake is coming off a 4-5 season, a rare losing and 
non-playoff year for the Panthers. Dunn, in his 25th year 
coaching football (24 as a head coach) will be once again 
calling on the option. 

Jerry French, a 6-1, 185-pound linebacker leads the group 
of starters on defense. Also back is tackle Aaron Yazzie, a 
6-2,200-pounder. 

Tesch and Lira will return to their positions in the sec- 
ondary. 

Robert Swanson, whom Dunn said is good enough to start 
at other schools, is Rodriquez' back-up at quarterback. 

Eddie Edison (5-9,160) returns at wide receiver as docs fel- 
low senior Mike Cardwell. 

Dunn, like most of his counterparts, picks defending 
Northwest Suburban Conference champ Wauconda as the 
team to beat 



Supporting All Our Teams 

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(708) 223-7900 

"Offering Superior quality homes with FREE 
appliances now through Oct. 30^ 1992." 



Best of Luck to All Teams! 

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& World of Fun 

421 W. Rollins Road 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

C70S) 546-2512 





TALKING 
TEES 

305 W. Rollins Rd.. 
Round Lake Beach 
(708) 546-8855 

Have A Great Season! 



GO TEAMS! 

Round Lake Area 
Park District 

814 Hart Road 
Round Lake, IL 

(708) 546-8558 




Have a great seasoni 



The Blue Bay 

855 £• RoUins Rd. 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

C708) X23*O404 




Doctors On Duty 

Emergency Physicians Group 

756 East Rollins Road 
Round Lake Beach, IL 



C708) 74CI-0300 




Friday, S»pt»rib»r 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 6B 






wMiw i^ ^ tJUUi * ' w Mr ^ ^Mjim^ ^h ^^im m 



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r, leaving 
slotback, 
fcmcach 
)t only in 

team last 
r place as 
he season 

huge but 
lesi assets 
t Randall, 
ers. 230; 

garcpeat 
firom last 

'. team, it's 
>ne person 

,SepL4at 



se 



V to run It," 

ides Vinnie 
at 5-9. 165. 
Luke, at 6- 

« losing and 
s 25th year 
once again 

Is the group 
»n Yazzie, a 

in the scc- 

)ugh to start 

back. 

' as does fcl- 

t defending 
;onda as the 



Rd., 
ach 
355 

i! 



roup 





Round Lake Roster 




Player 


Ht. 


Wt. 


CI. 


Pes. 


LukeTesch 


6-0 


205 


12 


FB 


Hany Gibson 


5-8 


160 


12 


RB 


Vincent Lira 


5-10 


170 


12 


RB-K 


Eddie Eidson 


5-9 


160 


12 


WR 


Justin Koski 


6-2 


175 


12 


TE-K 


Clint Rodriguez 


5-11 


170 


12 


QB 


Scott Muellemaim 


6-2 


170 


12 


TE 


Richard Fernandez 


5-6 


140 


11 


RB 


Brent Burns 


5-7 


140 


11 


RB 


Robert Swanson 


6-3 


180 


11 


QB-TE 


Ron Jindar 


5-10 


165 


11 


TE 


Bobby Tellcz 


5-7 


175 


11 


FB 


Allen Pauley 


5-11 


170 


11 


FB 


Aram Ponata 


5-8 


130 


11 


RB 


Chad Olson 


5-8 


170 


12 


FB 


Jason Morse 


5-9 


160 


11 


RB 


Randy Olson 


5-9 


165 


11 


RB 


Chad Lafferty 


5-8 


180 


12 


FB 


Stephen Deal 


6-0 


170 


11 


T 


David Hay 


5-8 


185 


11 


C 


James Busa 


5-8 


200 


11 


G 


Steven Horn 


6-1 


185 


12 


C 


Greg Rawlings 


5-10 


185 


12 


G 


Brian Brennan 


5-10 


165 


12 


T 


Chris Paiion 


5-11 


210 


12 


G-T 


Mike Nicmczyk 


6-0 


200 


12 


G 


Jeny French 


6-0 


200 


12 


G 


Aaron Yazzie 


6-2 


200 


12 


T 


WUI Reimer 


5-11 


160 


11 


T 


Walter Alvarenga 


6-0 


215 


11 


G 


John Cooper 


6-1 


185 


12 


T 


Christian Nelson 


5-10 


155 


11 


WR 


LAither Belcher 


6-1 


180 


11 


G 


Dan Sciortino 


6-1 


180 


12 


TE 


MikeCardweU ^ 


5-11 


130 


12 


WR 


Jon Weier 


5-6 


142 


11 


TE 


Jose Diaz 


5-7 


140 


11 


WR 



Rockets aim for fast start, Hnish 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

No doubt about it. the 1991 football season was an un- 
Rlchmond-Burton like experience. 

The Rockets lost all three non-conference games before 
facing a new division, the Big Northern White. 

But the Rockets caught fiie in October and finished strong, 
making the Class 2 A quarterfinals. The Rockets tied Warren 
for the most games played (12) in the area and Richmond's 
eight wins tied Wauconda for second. Libcrtyville's Dale 
Christensen has nine wins up on Richmond coach J. Randy 
Hofman, who finished the season with 109 Richmond 
wins. 

Senior Jeff Christensen leads the Rockets into the 1992 
season at quarterback. He will also handle the team's field- 
goal chores. It was his field goal against Genoa-Kingston 
that gave Richmond a key 13-12 win last year. 

"He's a pretty good thrower," Hofman said. 

B.C. Hunter returns to snap the ball to the QB for the thu-d 
straight year. "He is a captain of the team and a team leader. 
He tells the other kids what to do, "Hofman said. 

Hunter prepared for the season by attending a camp at 
Bishop DuUigan in Whcaton. 

Hofman believes the Rockets will have a talented receiving 
corps in seniors Jeff Swederski, JeffToler and Jeff Harris. 

Richmond looks to have a variety of offensive schemes. 
"We run a multiple offense. In the game against Marengo 
in the playoffs, we ran a power-I. We can run almost any- 
thing." Hofman said. 

The defense is anchored by linebacker Frank Pauley, all- 
conference player Hunter and Malt Zlamsiorff. 

"Practice has gone pretty well. After the first week, it gets 
a little easier to get inspired." Hofman said. 

That first week features the initial meeting at Cuba City 
Friday, Sept. 4. That led to some clever one-liners in prac- 



tice such as "Let's beat them Cubans." 
Hofman, 105-21 in 12 years, would like nothing better 
than to have just that happening. That would be a more 
Richmond-like start 



Richmond Roster 




PUyer 


Ht. 


Wt. 


CI. 


Pos. 


George Gutierrez 


5-7 


130 


9 


QB 


Jeff Christensen 


6-0 


160 


11 


QB-DB 


Jason Scnsabaugh 


5-10 


155 


10 


HB-DB 


Frank Pauley 


5-8 


185 


12 


FB-LB 


Tony Scacco 


5-3 


115 


10 


HB-DB 


Mall Zamsiorff 


5-8 


155 


12 


HB-DB 


Lucas Dchmlow 


5-9 


160 


10 


HB-U3 


Jason Jaltuch 


5A 


135 


10 


HB-DB 


Doug Nor 


5-10 


165 


9 


HB-LB 


Jeff Harris, 


5-10 


150 


12 


&DB 


Brian Stcaclman 


5-11 


180 


11 


HB-LB 


Eric "Razz" Rasmusscn 


5-7 


150 


11 


HB-LB 


Mike Dennis 


5-7 


145 


12 


HB-DB 


Andy Colbum 


5-8 


145 


11 


HB-DB 


Kevin Ruff 


5-6 


130 


10 


HB-DB 


Jody Swederski 


6-1 


160 


12 


HB-DB 


Jeremy McNabb 


5-8 


150 


11 


G-DG 


Tad Hocning 


5-11 


170 


12 


or-crr 


Chris Prentice 


5-10 


195 


12 


ODG 


Tom Jastrab 


5-11 


195 


10 


or-DT 


B.G. Hunter 


6-0 


205 


12 


C-DE 


Greg Rcgrder 


5-5 


145 


10 


HB-DB 


ToddBuchert 


6-0 


200 


11 


aoG 


Jason Fcnske 


6-2 


230 


11 


OT-DT 


Mike Wamer 


5-11 


190 


12 


CfT-DT 


Joe Metz 


6-0 


230 


12 


CfT-DT 


JeffToler 


6-2 


190 


11 


E-DT 


Eric Rasmusscn 


6-2 


170 


11 


E43E 


Mike Tock 


5-10 


145 


12 


E-DB 







Richmond-Burton Rockets 



The Best To All, Our Winning Teams 

Lakeland 
Newspapers 

Best in News And 




Advertising 

(708)223-8161 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 






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587-2222 
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Entertainment 

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w^japers 68 



7B Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, September 4. 1992 









• '■'uqi^L^kir/n^^^atr^. 



fit* 






,■■'-' 
J', 



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4 







Quality, not quantity is top Warhawk theme 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 



North Chicago Roster 



licularly in football. Coaches like to say they can have two gain from 170 last year). Steve started last year and is one 

platoons, that players will only have to go on offense or of the well kept secrets in the conference. He is definitely 

The old saying is there is strength through numbers, par- defense, that depth is a strength. quick and can change directions at the tip of a hat," Hamp- 

That is not the case at North Chicago Community High ton said. 

School. Senior Awwal Abdullia (6-1, 160) and junior Caius 

"If nothing else, the kids will be in better condition as a Swopes, Graylon Bobo head the wide receiving coip. 

starting point We have 21 varsity players, and all will have "I believe in a well-rounded attack, but we will probably 

to go both ways," North Chicago coach Rodney Hampton ruin more than we pass,'* he said, 

said. "Defensively we're sound. It is a strong point now," 

Hampton is entering his first year at the helm at North Hampton said. 

Chicago after being an assistant Hrst to Amos Jones, then Linebackers Earl and Survillon are back as well as 

to Mike Durrah last year. North Chicago is coming off a 4- Demetrius Mitchell in the secondary. 
S season, but feels contention for the second North Subur- 
ban Conference crown in two years is possible. 

"The players have been doing a lot of running, bleacher 



Player 

Awwal Abdullia 
Graylon Bobo 
Soalom Denton 
Steve Earl 
Donta Freeman 
Brian Gallo 
Dcion Harris 
Ajay Johnson 
Cyrus Johnson 
Javon Johnson 
Joshua Johnson 
Robert Lee 
Rashid Lindo 
Kobbie Long 
Demetrius Mitchell 
Calvin Myers 
Jamal PaUerson 
Randy Raines 



Ht. 

6-1 

5-11 

6-0 

5-11 

5-11 

5-11 

6-1 

6-0 

5-10 

6-0 

5-5 

5-11 

6-1 

5-9 

6-1 

5-9 

5-11 

5-11 



Wt. 

157 
186 
235 
165 
158 
170 
165 
160 
180 
175 
153 
175 
175 
150 
155 
268 
165 
165 



CI. 

12 

12 

11 

12 

9 

11 

10 

11 

12 

10 

11 

12 

11 

11 

12 

10 

12 

12 



Pos. 

TE-DE 

TE-DE-LB 

Or-DT 

RB-LB-DB 

OT-DE 

GDE 

TE-DE 

LB 

RB-DB 

QB 

FL-DB 

RB-DB-LB 

TEnSErDE 

QB-FL-DB 
TE-DB 

or-DT 

QB-SE-CB 
G-DE 



Freshman punter Rashad Hashide (5-6. 152) has the raw 
talent 
Hampton is hoping the Warhawks, who open the season 



Haside Rashid 


5-10 


153 


9 


P 


Mike Randolph 


5-8 


285 


12 


C-G'Ut 


Jessie Rossicr 


5-10 


150 


12 


C 


Antone Russell 


6-0 


230 


U 


c-or-DT 


Ronnie SurviUion 


6-0 


175 


12 


FB-G-LB 


Caius Swopes 


6-0 


160 


11 


SE-TECB 


Arthur WilUams 


5-11 


170 


10 


RB 



Steps for 20 minutes, winds for 250 yards and "crabbing" against pre-season favorite Lake Forest Saturday, Sept, 5, 
for 200 yards. This is on a daily basis," Hampton ex- can start strong. "The toughest part of our schedule is at the 
plained. beginning — Lake Forest, Stevenson and Warren. If we can 

North Chicago could very well have a two-quarterback win those three games, we can have an extremely successful 
look. Senior Jamal Patterson, S-foot-10, 155 pounds, is season," Hampton said. 

back, but junior Javon Johnson (6-1, 190) should see some Hampton remembers well how North Chicago caught 
playing time as well. Lake Forest before it jelled in the season opener in 1990 

"We'll have two quarterbacks in the realm of things, and then demolished Stevenson 36-6. The Warhawks went 
Javon will see just as much action. Both are very well on from there to go the playoffs for the first time, 
situated to be the starter," Hampton said. 

Ron Survillion (5-8. 180) is back at fullback while Cyrus 
Johnson and Steve Earl also return as running backs. 

"Cryrus has improved. He's more goal-oriented than he 
ever has been. He is extremely focused this year. Ron has 
been lifting most of the summer and is up to 180-185 (a 



Libertyville Roster 



Player 

Reed Christensen 
Peter Dousman 
Dave Kellon 
Edian Waugh 
Brian Church 
Robert Zinkowich 
Seth Aldridge 
John Mitchell 
Jamie Mueller 
Mike Mucha 
Andrew Robertson 
TomSweazy 

Ryan Janaes 

Joe Guido 

Jim Moras 

Mike Crane 

John Valend 

PaulCho 

Mike Laisen 

Ben Austin 

Mark Erbhuid 

Brian Kerpec 

Matt Farmer 

Bob Paulson 

Mike Tangoira 

Adam Coleman 

Todd Gierthy 

Mark Drcxel 

Bob Styrkowicz 

Mike Duffy 



Ht. 

6-0 

6-4 

6-3 

6-0 

5-7 

5-6 

6-2 

5-7 

5-10 

5-9 

5-11 

5-7 

5-9 

5-6 

6-0 

6-0 

5-9 

5-9 

6-0 



7 

1 

U 

9 

11 

8 



■11 

11 



■1 



Wt. 

210 

193 

183 

163 

152 

115 

200 

150 

165 

157 

165 

150 

134 

126 

169 

160 

158 

150 

185 

150 

149 

190 

156 

150 

141 

163 

195 

190 

185 

198 



CI. 

11 

12 

12 

12 

12 

11 

11 

11 

12 

12 

U 

12 

11 
11 
11 
12 
11 
12 
12 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
U 
11 
11 
11 



Pos. 

LB 

S 

LB 

QB 

C 

S 

QB 

QB 

S 

DB 

QB 

HB 

HB 

FL 

C 

S 

C 

HB 

HB 

HB 

C 

FB 

SS 

C 

HB 

FL 

LB 

G 

G 

G 



Mark Skale 
Sandoval Cuauhtemoc 
Nathan Klontz 
Sean KnoUenberg 
Eric Wiesneth 
Pat Jenetten 
John Haberski 
EUiol Hsu 
Dave Mooney 
Matt Fredrick 
Hanney Eltoumi 
Toby Tate 
Aaron Peterson 
Bob Fulbright 
Dennis Dunn 
Dave Kosowski 
Kirk Jackson 
Bobby Brown 
Mark Russert 
Dan Thomas 
Jcny French 
Aaron Yazrie 
Will Reimer 
Waller Alvarenga 
Johii Cooper 
Christian Nelson 
Luther Belcher 
Dan Sciortino 
Mike Cardwell 
Jon WciCT 
Jose Diaz 



6-3 

5-8 

6-0 

5-10 

6-0 

5-10 

6-2 

5-9 

-10 

-3 

-3 

-9 

-8 



190 12 

180 12 

200 11 

210 11 



5- 
6- 
6- 
5- 
5- 



184 
233 
247 
184 
185 
208 
213 
208 



12 
12 
11 
12 
12 
11 
11 
12 



6-2 
6-2 
6-2 
6-1 
6-3 
6-0 



185 11 

250 12 

205 12 

210 12 

170 12 

172 11 



5- 
6- 
6- 
5- 
6- 
6- 



-11 

-0 

-2 

-11 

-0 

■1 
5-10 
6-1 
6-1 
5-11 
5-6 
5-7 



173 
163 
200 
200 



11 
11 

12 
12 



160 11 
215 11 



185 
155 



12 
11 



180 11 

180 12 

130 12 

142 11 

140 11 



T 

LB 

G 

G 

G 

T 

T 

G 

T 

T 

G 

T 

G 

T 

T 

G 

E 

E 

E 

E 

G 

T 

T 

G 

T 

WR 

G 

TC 

WR 

TE 

WR 



Health, 
keys for 



defense 
'Cats 



by HEATHER McDONALD 

Lakeland Newspapers 

As long as the Libertyville football team stays healthy, 
they could be contenders in the North Suburban Conference 
this year, according to Coach Dale Christensen. 

The Wildcats went 3-6 last year mainly because of in- 
juries. Quarterback Ethan Waugh, a returning senior, sat 
out over half the season with a shoulder separation and 
back-up quarterback Andrew Robertson, a junior, suffered 
from a brdcen collar bone. 

"We did not have the depth to oversee those injuries," 
said Christsnscn. "With two quarterbacks injured, it's hard." 

Libertyville docs not have the numbers to support the 
team if many injuries occur this year either. 

"How we do this is year contingent on whether or not we 
stay healthy," Christensen said. "We can challenge any 
team, but to win, we have to stay healthy." 

Along with keeping healthy. Christensen will be sb'ess- 
ing defense. Libertyville has been known as a good defen- 
sive team and has shut down many good teams because of 
that Christensen maintains that good defense brings about 
good offense. 

"About 95 percent of people who have been in this game 
know that you win defensively," he said. 

It helps that a number of last year's defensive men are re- 
turning this year. Christensen specifically pointed out two 
returning juniors, linebackers Andrew Robertson and Todd 
Gierthy. But the Wildcats also have a good offensive team. 

"An outstanding senior Mark Richardson, a split-end, was 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Good Luck for a Great Season! 




1313SkokieHwy 
Giirnee, IL 
n'eVpO RT (708)662-2050 



CREDIT UNION 






|Have a great season: 

Great Lakes Credit Union 

2525 Green Bay Road 

North Chicago, IL 

(708) 578-7000 



GOOD LUCK!! 

To The 1992-1993 Football Teanu 

From 

Fobs Park District 

& 

The North Chicago Football Flames 



The North Chicago Flames is a great place 

to start getting your youngster Involved in 

learning the fundamentals of football I 



i\ 



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',1 



Friday. SaplonritMr 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 8B 



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Third time playoff charm for Sliyhawk grid hopes? 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Visitofs to Johnsburg High School football games will be 
able to have more seating this fall. Those with business in 
the press box wiU have new st^s making the trip easier. 

The Skyhawks are hoping two near misses in a row fcu- 
the playoffs will inspire them for a strong start, giving the 
visitors to Johnsburg a favorable impression. 



Johnsburg 


Roster 




Player 


Ht. 


wt. 


CI. 


Pos. 


Pat Brey 


6-2. 


180 


12 


QB-DB 


Ed Lawrence 


5-10 


155 


12 


WR-DB 


Scott Bietman 


5-8 


160 


11 


Rfi-LB 


John Paul Dudley 


6-3 


195 


11 


QB-DB 


Brian Rygiel 


5-9 


140 


12 


WR-DB 


Shwn Roby 


5-10 


155 


11 


WR-DB 


ToddFreund 


6-2 


175 


12 


WR-DB 


ChadGermann 


5-9 


160 


11 


RB-LB 


Chris Gutekunst 


6-2 


180 


12 


FB-LB 


Jim Amos 


6-0 


180 


12 


G^ra 


Russ Smith 


5-11 


180 


12 


FB-DB 


Jason Carlson 


5-7 


165 


12 


WR-LB 


Mike Eisenmenger 


5-11 


170 


12 


FB-LB 


Jay Lennon 


6-2 


185 


12 


TE-LB 


Ed Juergensen 


6-2 


210 


12 


aDT 


Tim Amos 


6-0 


180 


11 


G-NG 


Adam Fowles 


5-9 


160 


12 


G-LB 


Brian Rich 


5-7 


185 


12 


C-DT 


Jeremiah Lego 


5-10 


225 


11 


C-DT 


Jason Bolda 


6-0 


210 


12 


OT-DT 


Chris Olson 


6-0 


225 


11 


CfT-UT 


ScoUDiedrich 


6-1 


235 


11 


OT-DT 


Mark Buchanan 


6-3 


195 


12 


G-DE 


Martin James 


S-7 


250 


12 


OT-DT 


Kenny Michcls 


5-11 


245 


U 


OT-DT 


Shawn Randazzo 


5-8 


150 


11 


WR-DB 


Mike Berezowski 


5-7 


145 


11 


WR-DB 


Ryan Gough 


6-3 


180 


12 


WR-NG 


Ken Dodge 


6-0 


165 


12 


WR-LB 



Johnsburg can switch hit at quarterback with a lefty and 
righty. The left-handed thrower is senicv Pat Brey. a 6-foot- 
2-inch, 170-pounder. The righty is junior John Paul Dud- 
ley, a 6-3, 195-pounder. 

"The difference is Pat is more of a runner while John is 
more of a passer," said Johnsburg coach Hap Farlow. 

Russ Smith, who had 10 touchdowns and was the team's 
leading rusher last year, returns. Senior Todd Fniend, who 
had eight touchdowns, is also back. 

Tor a number of reasons, we started more juniors than 
seniors in the last game of the year. That should give us 
some Idds with experience heading into the first game," 
Farlow said. 

The last game of 1991 was an emotional battle for Johns- 
burg, looking 10 get into the playoffs with a win over 
Wauconda. It came down to the last play deep in Wauconda 
territory. The Bulldog defense held, sending the Skyhawks 
home settling fcM* their second-straight winning season. 

"That is the furst time we have had back-lo-back winning 
seasons in the history of the school. We can attribute that 
to either better senior players or more effort. I would say it 
is a good balance of both," Farlow said. 

League MVP Matt Christman, the QB. is gone, along 
with line standout Jake Wakitsch. Few Johnsburg fans will 
ever forget the 34-31 win over Round Lake at mid-season 
with Christman scoring with seconds left "That was the 
most exciting high school game I have ever been associated 
with," Farlow said. 

Linebacker Mike Eiscrman, safety Brey and defensive end 
Jay Lennon are players who saw a lot of playing time on 
defense. 

Ed Juergensen, a 6-2. 210-pounder, and Mike Buchanan, 
are back on the line. Ken Michcls, a 6-1. 240-pounder also 
could lead the battle of the trenches. 

Hie kicking game remained a question mark heading into 
die team's annual pre-season scrimmage. 

Richmond-Burton is no longer on the schedule as an non- 
conference opponent, as the Skyhawks open by hosting 



Dundee-Crown Friday, SepL 4. 

"Our No. 1 objective is to be 6-3 and make the playoffs. 
We think 6-3 will get us into the playoffs. In the last two 
years, we would have been the third highest in Class 4A or 
the fourth highest if we had won the last game. 

As for the Northwest Suburban Conference race. Farlow 
picks defending champ Wauconda. 

Bears ready for 
2nd FVC slate 

by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Hope brings eternal when the record book states 0-0 and 
the main chores are organizational in nature rather than how 
will you stop the other team's 6-foot-6, 250-pound line- 
man. 

Tm very endiisiastic. Fm really happy with the way the 
kids have been working and their attitude is very positive," 
Lake Zurich Coach Wayne Kuklinski said. 

The Bears are entering their second season in the Fox Val- 
ley Conference, and took over from Jacobs as the confer- 
ence's doormat with seven losses. That came after (^ning- 
season wins over Momence and Grant, the same pre-confer- 
ence schedule the Bears have this fall. 

Quarterback Jerry Blum, a 6-2, 165-pound senior, leads a 
large contingent of returnees. "He has matured and he 
throws the ball better. He's a captain and a leader," Kuklin- 
ski said. 

Joe Carbis, the team's second leading rusher last year, is 
back at fullback. Senior wide receiver Jack Henderson and 
senior tackle Scott Rybarczyk (5-10, 225) also return. 
Henderson started the second half of last year as a safety and 
kicker but wUl play wide receiver. 
(Continued on page 10) 




4949 Grand Ave. 

Gumee, IL 
(708)249-4644 



1720 Green Bay Rd. 

North Chicago, IL 

(708)689-3222 



THAD W. PENN, M.D. 
THOMAS E. BAIER, M.D. 
MICHAEL J. QUINN, M.D. 

JOHN G. MAYER, M.D. 
ROGER B. COLLINS, M.D. 



105 GREENLEAF STREET 
GURNEE. ILUNOIS 60031 
(708) 623-3090 



1900 HOLUSTER DRIVE 

LIBERTYVILLE. ILUNOIS 60048 

(708)680-4765 



We Wish the best to all 
area High School teams. 

GiiRNEE National Bank 



Grand Avanue al Houte 21 
Grand Aveniw at Hutchlna Road 
P.O. Box 706 GumM. 1160031 
(708) 244^620 FAX #(706) a*4-T727 
f?oe) 2 65-210 

(708) 244-6620 




FDIC 



9B Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, Soptember 4, 1992 



w 



/■■f 



I t 



#1 

■*1 



1 



^1 

r 
I 



I 



m 

III ll' 



If 




if-" 














Lake Zurich Roster 










Player 


Ht. 


Wt. 


CI. 


Fob. 












JcnyBlum 


6-2 


165 


12 


QB-DB 


Jason Mercer 


5-9 


170 


11 


C-BT 


Mou Sewing 


5-8 


155 


11 


HB-DB 


Jason Gorskft 


5-U 


195 


11 


our 


Jerry Hedges 


6-0 


165 


11 


QB-DB 


AdamEnnis 


5-11 


200 


11 


or-DT. 


Jack Henderson 


6-0 


170 


12 


WR-DB 


Brett Bama 


5-10 


170 


11 


GDE 


Bryan Haigh 


5-9 


150 


11 


QB-DB 


Nick Tsiakals 


6-0 


195 


12 


G-LB 


Travis Powell 


5-9 


150 


11 


HB-DB 


Brian Poss 


6-1 


200 


11 


OT-DT 


Mark Henninger 


5-11 


165 


12 


HB-DB 


Blair Epstein 


5-10 


235 


12 


OT-DT 


Mike Duke 


5-9 


140 


11 


WR-DB 


Shane Gobs 


6-0 


170 


11 


G-DE 


Joe Carbis 


5-11 


190 


12 


FB-LB 


Sean Welch 


5-10 


180 


11 


anr 


Cliff Nelisi 


5-8 


150 


12 


HBDB 


Scott Rybarczyk 


5-10 


225 


12 


or-crr 


Rich Mowen 


5-8 


150 


11 


HB-DB 


Ryan Russell 


6-3 


215 


12 


or-DT 


James Conway 


5-9 


155 


11 


FB-DB 


Kris Nelson 


6-2 


195 


11 


C-DT 


Jeremy Siegel 


5-8 


155 


11 


HB-DB 


Brian Eiswerth 


5-11 


185 


11 


C-UT 


Andy Goglin 


5-11 


160 


11 


FB-LB 


Randy Loewecke 


6-2 


190 


12 


OT^DT 


DanMeiKktza 


5-9 


160 


11 


HB-LB 


Joe Heffeman 


6-1 


203 


11 


C-UT 


Steve Lebron 


5-9 


175 


12 


FB-LB 


Jeff Pokiyfkc 


6-2 


185 


11 


&DE 


Mike Pepin 


5-11 


150 


11 


WR-DB 


John Chrislensen 


6-1 


170 


12 


WR-DB 


ScoU Ganan 


5-11 


160 


11 


HB-DT 


Brian Gabriel 


6-1 


205 


12 


E-DE 


Bryan Long 


6-1 


190 


11 


FB-LB 


Jason Little 


6-2 


190 


11 


CT-DE 


James Cucller 


5-10 


165 


12^ 


HB-DB 


Joe Sadowski 


6-0 


165 


11 


E-DE 


Jason Miller 


5-11 


215 


11 


CT-DT 


Chris MiUer 


6-3 


195 


11 


EOE 



Bears 



(Continued from page 9) 

Senior tackle Blair Epstein is the biggest Bear at 5-10, 
235. Jason Miller^ a junior and another tackle, is next at 
225. "We're probably a little on the small size," Kuklinski 
said. 

James Cuellar, a standout pitcher at Lake Zurich, is back 
at halfback and defensive back. He played freshman and 
sophomore years, but did not play last year. "He has been a 
pleasant surprise," Kuklinski said of the senior. 

Tlieie are 29 juniors on the Lake Zurich pre-season roster 
and they won't be doing a lot of sitting. "We have four ju- 
niors on the offensive line. How they will do will be a big 
factor," he said. 

"We're in the Fox Valley to stay — we might as Well 
make the best of it," Kuklinski said. 

Year n in the FVC begins Sept 18 with a home game 
against Crystal Lake South. The Lake Zurich mentor, in 
his lOlh year, eyes McHenry as the team to beat 



Carmel contingent prepares for 'payback' in '92 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

OK, it's a cliche. 

But the old saying, The road to success is always under 
construction," is doubly true at Carmel High School these 
days. A maze of arrows and fences point a visitor to the 
right direction at the Mundelein school. Football coach 
Mike Fitzgibbons is hoping a junior quarterback can lead 
the Corsairs back to tbe playoff success of 1989 and 1990. 

Being a sophomtxe starting quarterback in the varsity wars 
of the East Suburban Catholic Conference may be aikin to 
shooting an arrow and having to hit an apple. Chances for 
failure are great, while success may be hard b> come by. 

After a baptism of fire in a 2-7 Carmel year in 1991, Tony 
Longmire is ready to take charge. "He has done a great job. 
We are very pleased. He is playing like a senior," Fitzgib- 
bons said. 

Longmire completed SO percent of his passes last year. 
This fall, a healthy, talented and consistent running game 
gives the 5-foot-9-inch, I'K^pound Longmire some strong 
options. 

Running back Jermaine Williams is back afu:r 375 yards 
in 55 carries in just 15 quarters last year. Injuries cut his 
football season ^ort, but not long enough before the North 
Chicago native contributed his deadly accurate three-point 
basketball shot Other seniors looking to see starting time 
as running back arc Jamil Swift, 5-8, 165 and J.D. Clark, 
6-1, 220. 

One of the T-shirts being worn by the Corsairs '92 
contingent carries a simple message: "It's Operation Pay- 
back," 

"The attitudes are terrifflc and we have had no major in- 
juries. The seniors have really stuck together and done a lot 
of lifting," Fitzgibbons said! 

Defensively, returning are defensive back Brad Kalk, and 
second-leading tackier Dan Medina at linebacker. 



Junior Vince Murray added 10 to IS pounds to his strong 
defensive tackle build. Tackle Pat Potempa, end Art Loud, 
linebacker Steve Zuicker also return. 

Ganett Jansen will handle the extra points, Matt Head and 
Rob Hiltz wiU punt and Clark will kickoff. 

"We're trying to turn special teams into 'special — ty' 
teams. We are really emphasizing the kicking game," 



Fitzgibbons said. 

Fitzgibbons is 32-26 in sue years at Carmel as the Cor- 
sairs work out the kinks before the home season opener 
Friday, Sept 4 against St Laurence. 

"Getting back to the playoffs and winning the conference. 
We can do that if we gain confidence and play like we can," 
Fitzgibbons said. 



Carmel Roster 




GO teams: 

La Charnte 
Beauty Salon 

63 S. Whitney Street 

Grayslake, Illinois 

(708) 2234921 



Player 


Ht. 


Wt. 


CI. 


Pos. 


Tony Longmire 


5-10 


170 


11 


QB 


Rick Koseor 


5-9 


145 


11 


DB 


Rudy Magru 


5-6 


140 


11 


DB 


Mike Mordini 


6-0 


155 


11 


OB 


Geoff Payne 


6-0 


160 


12 


RB 


Brian Narajowsld 


5-10 


ISO 


11 


QB 


Eric Janssens 


5-11 


175 


11 


RB 


Brian Scardina 


5-11 


ISO 


12 


DB 


Eric Walkanoff 


5-9 


145 


12 


DB 


DanDiocnede 


5-8 


150 


11 


DB 


Ryan Godwin 


5-10 


155 


12 


TE 


Kenye Pendleton 


5-9 


150 


11 


DB 


Lawrence Lahr 


6-1 


160 


12 


Ifi 


Rob Hilty 


5-11 


155 


12 


DB 


Victor Castro 


5-11 


150 


12 


DB 


Jamil Swift 


5-9 


155 


12 


RB 


Dustin Pearson 


5-10 


175 


11 


RB 


PatBunce 


5-10 


160 


11 


RB 


Jennaine Williams 


5-9 


155 


12 


RB 


Chris Anilio 


5-8 


140 


12 


DB 


Carl Painter 


5-8 


140 


12 


RB 


Shannon Santos 


5-10 


160 


11 


LB 


Jamie Kiraly 


6-0 


180 


11 


IB 


Marty Hansen 


6-1 


170 


11 


LB 


Brad Kalk 


6-2 


175 


12 


DB 


J.D. Clark 


6-1 


224 


12 


RB 





Steve Zuiker 
DenDiew 
Tim Kelson 
Dan Medina 
Charles Burgoon 
Rafael Rivera 
Joey Tilton 
Matt Cocanig 
Matt Head 
Jason Chorazy 
Rocky Castellano 
Kevin McCann 
Chris Threadgill 
Matt Ehrhaidt 
Pat Potenqia 
Keith Stolarick 
Jose Abella 
B.J. Coleman 
Jeff Schutz 
Kris Oleson 
Vince Murray 
George Kovarsky 
Mike Choroski 
Alt Loud 
Mark Bitto 
Dave Zorzy 
Shawn Gafhiey 



6-3 

5-10 

5-9 

5-11 

6-0 

5-10 

5-11 

5-11 

5-10 

5-10 

5-9 

5-10 

5-10 

6-2 

5-10 

5-10 

5-9 

6-0 

6-0 

6-1 

5-11 

6-1 

6-2 

6-4 

6-6 

6-0 

6-0 



175 
150 
145 
190 
185 
205 
165 
190 
165 
210 
165 
165 
180 
235 
215 
200 
240 
270 
185 
215 
235 
250 
165 
225 
191 
165 
255 



12 
12 
11 
12 
11 
12 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
11 
11 
11 
12 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
12 
11 
11 
12 
11 
12 
II 



IB 

SE 

LB 

LB 

IB 

O 

IB 

G 

LB 

C 

DT 

C 

G 

G 

DT 

or 

DT 

or 

DE 
DE 

or 
or 

SE 
DE 
TE 
IE 

or 



Friday, Soptomber 4, 1992 



GOOD LUCK 



DANAHER CORPORATION 

1675 Delany Road 
Gurnee, IL 

(708) 662-2666 



Logo -ago go 



Advertising /Graphic Services 



Post Office Box 7766, Grayslake, IL 60030 
TEL 70H.223.8167 FAX 708.223.8810 



Lakelartd Newspapers 10B 






■^Av: 



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Patriots plan smart moves to battle back to playoffs 



DAN BERNARD "We've got some bright kids," Mitz said "You teach 

Lakeland Newspapers them something one or two times and they remember it — 

If the Stevenson High School Patriots make it to the niles» alignments, assignments." 

playoffs again this year, it'll be by brains as much as by Leading the Patriots' charge are a trio of returning se- 

Inrawn, says Head Coach Bill Mitz. niors who Mitz says have earned leadership positions by 



Stevenson Roster 



Player 

Dave Powen 
Nate Smith 
FtedDasso 
Kyle McElroy 
PhiLUoyd 
Dave Herman 
Steve Johnson 
Nike Mortiorano 
Steve Doench 
MatlPalcer 
Jason Cato 
Ken Allen 
FarajiLeaiy 
Gus Steger 
Jeff Junia 
Mark Griffin 
J.B. Gilmore 
Rober Redmond 
Greg Schulz 
Phil Malo 
JoeNuara 
Dean Btclawa 
Brian Biickbichler 
Eric Schmidt 



Ht. 


Wt. 


Pes. 


Craig Floress 


5-11 


180 


E-DB 


Dave Valenti 


6-3 


180 


QB-DB 


Tony Wilmet 


6-1 


160 


QB 


Steve Halcias 


60 


150 


QB 


MauZusel 


5-11 


155 


TE 


Mike Wisnlewski 


5-7 


150 


WR 


Skceter Von Guntcn 


6:i 


180 


DB 


Ryan Rusin 


5-10 


160 


WR-DB 


Scott Schneider 


5-6 


145 


WR 


Ken Hou 


5-5 


130 


WR-DB 


Greg Fried 


5-10 


165 


RB-LB 


Orlando Mroin 


5-7 


160 


RB-DB 


Josh Duncan 


6-1 


175 


RB-DB 


Justin Lockaid 


6-1 


175 


RB-DB 


Todd Woznicwski 


5-9 


155 


DB 


Travis Pohlmeier 


5-9 


185 


DB 


Paul Corliss 


5-10 


185 


RB-LB 


Scott Klingberg 


6-0 


190 


RB-LB 


Kevin Frederick 


5-8 


165 


RB-DB 


Mike Sigal 


5-10 


140 


WR 


Greg Abshire 


5-10 


175 


TE-WR 


Brian Walkie 


5-10 


180 


G-LB 


Jason Breuer 


6-1 


214 


CfT-DT 


Jon Kodoski 


6-1 


232 


CfTAJT 


J.D. Foraker 



6- 
5- 

5- 

6- 
6- 
5- 
5- 



-2 

-11 

-10 

-1 

-0 

-11 

-7 

6-1 

5-0 

6-1 

5-11 

5-11 

6-0 

5-8 

6-4 

6-1 

6-1 

6-1 

6-1 

5-10 

6-1 

5-9 

6-4 

6-3 

5-11 



175 

206 

170 

175 

180 

190 

160 

245 

140 

185 

165 

266 

254 

170 

210 

155 

180 

145 

175 

160 

165 

185 

205 

175 

155 



C-LB 
G-DT 
GLB 
GJ^G 
G-LB 
C-NG 
G-NG 
C-DT 
G 

or-LB 

G-LB 

crr-ur 
or-DT 

G-LB 

crr-DT 

TE 

TE 

WR 

WR-DB 

TE 

WR-DB 

TE-LB 

TE 

WR-LB 

TE 



their dedication over the last year. This year's tri-capiains 
are Gus Steger, safety; Dave Valenti, linebacker, and J.B. 
Gilmore, linebacker. 

"They worked hard all winter, and they're leading by ex- 
ample," Mitz said. 

Mitz' goal is to repeat the feat the team has pulled off for 
the last four years and make the North Suburban Confer- 
ence playoffs. The key, Mitz says, is "hard work and disci- 
pline." That's something Mitz and assistant coaches Tom 
Baumann, Charlie Bilodeau, Tom Bujnowski, Phil Raf- 
faelli, Craig Sincora, Bob Smith, can do something about 
it. 

But then there's the part of winning that is out of their 
ccHitrol — "getting good breaks," as Mitz said. 

It was one bad break that cost Stevenson the conference 
title last year, Mitz believes: In the fourth quarter of the 
game against Warren High School, a snap to the Stevenson 
punter sailed over his head. 

"What can you do?" Mitz said. "Sometimes it comes 
down to one play where things just go wrong." 

Injuries were only a slight problem last season, and Mitz 
said he expected to see all players up to full su^englh by the 
start of the season. Steger broke his jaw in an accident off 
the field before the Warren game and lost weight over the 
summer, but has recovered. 

The Patriots have a moderate number of seniors return- 
ing. And the team is receiving a surprise bonus in transfer 
student Brian Birckbirchler, a junior-year tackle who comes 
to Stevenson from Wilmette's Loyola Academy. Is Birck- 
birchler a "secret weapon" for Stevenson? "We're not telling 
anyone yet," said Mitz. 
Smart move. 






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Stevenson Patriots 



FLORAL ACRES 

Rt.83, 1 Miles, of Antioch\ 
Antioch, Illinois 
(708) 395-1211 

"Goad Luck S&t^uoitsl" 



liSI^I 



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24417 75th STREET (HWY. 50) 
SALE M (PADDOCK UKE). WISCONSIN 53168 

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874 Main S1^ C^M) 395-1000 
Antlocli 



^>^Rk t^^Si V^^^> Vt^Jr> ^^Jil^ff) 



116 Lakdtand Newspapers 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



, J,»«i"'-*IlQ'«*t 



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^92 Regular season scheduled 



Antioch 

Nickname: Sequoits 

1991 Record: 6-4 

Gsss: 5 A 

Conference: North Suburban 

Head Coach: Del Pcchauer 



Date 

Sept. S 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 19 
Sept. 26 
Oct. 3 
Ocu 10 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 24 
Oct 31 



Site Opponent 

A Libcnyvillc* 

H Lake Forest* 

A Stevenson* 

H Warren* 

A Auburn 

H North Chicago* 

A Fcnion* 

A Mundelem* 

H Zion-Bcnton* 



Time 

1 p.m. 
1 p.m> 
7:30 p.m. 

1 p.m. 

2 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 

1 p.m. 



Carmel 

Nickname: Corsairs 

1991 record: 2-7 

Class: 4A 

Confcrcncc: East Suburban CaihoUc 

Head Coach: Mike Pii2gibbons 



Date Site Opponent 

Sept. 4 H Sl Laurence 

Sept. 11 H Fcnwick 

Sept. 18 A Sl Viator* 

Sept. 25 H St. Joseph* 

Oct. 2 H Catholic Acad.* 

Oct. 9 A Marisi* 

Oct 16 H Holy Cross* 

OcL 23 A Noire Dame* 

Oct 31 A Bcnct Academy* 



Time 

7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
8 p.m. 
S p.m. 
S p.m. 
8 p.m. 
8 p.m. 
8 p.m. 
1 p.m. 



Grant 

Nickname: Bulldogs 

1991 record: 0-9 

Class: 4A 

Conference: Northwest Suburban 

Head Coach: Mark Barczak 

Date Site Opponent Time 

Sept. 4 H Jacobs 7:30 p.m. 

Sept. n A Lake Zurich 7:30 p.m. 

Sept. 18 H SL Francis 7:30 p.m. 

ScpL 25 A Marmion 1:45 p.m. " 

OcL 2 H Round Ukc* 7:30 p.m. 

Oct. 9 A Wauconda* 7:30 p.m. 

Oct 16 H Grayslakc* 1 p.m. 

OcL 23 A Johnsburg* 7:30 p.m. 

OcL 30 H Marian* 7:30 p.m. 

Grayslake 

Nickname: Rams 

1991 record: 2-7 

Class: 4A 

Conference: Northwest Suburban 

Head Coach: Bill Johnson 

Date Site Opponent Time 

Sept. 4 H Marengo 7:30 p.m. 



SepL 11 
ScpL 18 
Sept. 26 
OcL 2 
0cl9 
OcL 16 
Ocl23 
Ocl30 



A Crystal L. CcnL 

H Marmion 

A Sl Francis 

H Johnsburg* 

A Marian* 

A Grant* 

H Wauconda* 

H Round Lake* 



8 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1:45 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 



Date 

Sept. 4 
ScpL 11 
ScpL 18 
Sept. 26 
Oct, 2 
Ocl9 
OcL 16 
Ocl23 
Ocl30 



Date 

Sept. 4 
ScpL 11 
Sept. 18 
Sept. 26 
Ocl2 
Ocl9 
OcL 17 
Ocl23 
OclSO 



Johnsburg 

Nickname: Skyhawks 
1991 record: 5-4 
Class: 4A 
Conference: Northwest Suburban 
Head Coach: Hap Farlow 

Site Opponent Time 

H Dundcc-Cfown 7:30 p.m. 

A Harvard 7:45 p.m. 

H Imm. Con. 7:30 p.m. 

A Driscoll 2 p.m. 

A Grayslakc* 7:30 p.m. 

A Round lake* 7:30 p.m. 

H Marian * 7:30 p.m. 

H Gram* 7:30 p.m, 

A Wauconda* 7:30 p.m. 

Lake Zurich 

Nickname: Bears 

1991 record: 2-7 

Class: 4A 

Conference: Fox Valley 

Head Coach: Wayne Kuklinski 



Date 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 12 
SepL 19 
Sept. 26 
OcL 3 
OcL 10 
OcL 16 
Ocl24 
Ocl31 



Site Opponent 

A Momcnce 

H Grant 

H Crystal L. So.* 

A Gary Grove* 

H Dundee-Crown* 

A Woodstock* 

H Jacobs* 

A Crystal L. Cent* 

H McHcnry* 



Time 
7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 



Libertyville 

Nickname: Wildcats 
1991 record: 3-6 
Class: 6A 
Confcrcncc: North Suburban 
Head Coach: Dale Christcnscn 

Site Opponent Time 

H Aniioch* I p.m. 

A Mundcletn* 1 p.m. 

H Zion-Bcnton* 1 p.m. 

H Fcnton* 1 p.m. 

A Lake Forest* 1 p.m. 

H Stevenson* I p.m. 

A Warren* 7 p.m. 

H Guilford I p.m. 

A North Chicago* 1 p.m. 



Date 

Sept. 5 
SepL 12 
ScpL 19 
Sept. 26 
Oct. 3 
OcL 10 
OcL 17 
0cl24 
Oct 30 



Date 

Sept. 5 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 18 
Sept. 26 
OcL 2 
OcLlO 
Oct 17 
OcL 24 
Ocl31 



Mundclein 

Nickname: Mustangs 
1991 record: 0-9 
Class: SA 
Confcrcncc: North Suburban 
Head Coach: Mike Fgan 

Site Opponent Time 

A Zion-Benlon* 1 p.m. 

H Libertyville* I p.m. 

A Lake Forest* 1 p.m. 

H Stevenson* 1 p.m. 

A Warren* 1 p.m. 

H Frceport 2 p.m. 

A North Chicago* 1 p.m. 

H Antioch* 1 p.m. 

A Fcnton* 7:30 p.m. 

North Chicago 

Nickname: Warhawks 

1991 record: 4-5 

Class; 5A 

Conference: North Suburban 

Head Coach: Wayne Hampton 



Site Opponent 

A Lake Forest* 

H Stevenson* 

A Warren* 

H Rockford East 

A Fcnton* 

A Aniioch* 

H Mundelem* 

A Zion-Bcnton* 

H Libertyville* 



Time 
1 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
I p.m. 
1 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
1 p.m. 



Richmond-Burton 

Nickname: Rockets 

1991 record: 8-4 

Class: 2A 

Confcrcncc: Big Northern (White Division) 

Head Coach: J. Randy Hofman 



Date Site Opponent 

SepL 4 A Cuba City 

SepL 11 H Peoria ND 

ScpL IS H Marengo 

ScpL 25 A Haivari 

Oct. 2 H Genoa KingsL* 

OcL 10 H Byron* 

OcL 17 A Ham shire* 

OcL 23 A Forrcston* 

OcL 30 H Oregon* 



Time 

7 p.m. 
7 p.m. 
7:15 p.m. 
7:15 p.m. 
7:15 p.m. 
1:15 p.m. 
12:15 p.m, 
7:15 p.m. 
7:15 p.m. 



Date 
ScpL 4 
Sept. 12 



Round Lake 

Nickname: Panthers 
1991 record: 4-5 
Class: 4A 
Confcrcncc: Northwest Suburban 
Head Coach: Mike Dunn 
Site Opponent Time 

H McHcnty 7:30 p.m. 

A Gtcnbard South 1:30 p.m. 



Sept. 18 

ScpL 26 

Ocl2 

Ocl9 

OcLl7 

Ocl23 

Ocl30 



Date 

Sept. 4 
ScpL 12 
ScpL 18 
ScpL 26 
Ocl2 
OcL 10 
OcL 16 
Ocl23 
Ocl30 



Date 

Sept. 4 
Sept. 12 
SepL 18 
ScpL 26 
OcL 3 
OcL 10 
OcL 16 
Ocl24 
Ocl30 



H 
A 
A 
H 
H 
A 
A 



Driscoll 

Lnm. Con. 

Grant* 

Johnsburg* 

Wauconda* 

Marian* 

Grayslakc* 



7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 



Stevenson 

Nickname: Patriots 
1991 record: 6-4 
Class: 6A 
Conference: North Suburban 
Head Coach: Bill Milz 

Site Opponent Time 

H Wheeling 7:30 p.m. 

A North Chicago* 1 p.m, 

H Antioch* 7:30 p.m. 

A Mundclein* I p.m. 

H Zion-Bcnton* 7:30 p.m. 

A Libertyville* 1 p.m. 

H Lake Fon:st* 7:30 p.m. 

H Fcnion* 7:30 p.m. 

A Warren* 7:30 p,m. 

Warren 

Nickname: Blue Devils 

1991 record: 10-2 . 

Class: 5A 

Confcrcncc: North Suburban 

Head Coach: Reggie Hughes 



Site Opponent 

A Fcnton* 

A Dundee-Crown 

H North Chicago* 

A Aniioch* 

H Mundclein* 

A Zion-Bcnton* 

H Libertyville* 

A Lake Forest* 

H Stevenson* 



Time 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p,m. 
7:30 p.m. 



Date 
Sept. 4 
ScpL 11 
Sept. IS 
ScpL 26 
OcL 2 
OcL 10 
Oct 17 
Ocl23 
Ocl30 



Wauconda 

Nickname: Bulldogs 

1991 record: 8-3 

Class: 4A 

Conference: Northwest Suburban 

Head Coach: Bob Kaspcr 



Site 

H 

A 

H 

A 

H 

H 

A 

A 

H 



Opponent 
Caiy Grove 
Jacobs 
Monlini 
Sl Edward 
Marian * 
Grant* 
Round Lake* 
Grayslakc* 
Johnsburg* 



Time 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
1 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 



^Denotes conference games 



'i 



: ( ■ I 



ii>t 



Ankle injury ends year, career for Vikes' Borzick 



by STEVE PETERSON 
LakelaDd Newspapers 

Lake County Vikings were comfortably ahead 35-0 at 
halftime of a game Saturday against Giicago Thunder. 

Instead of being part of tlie huddie, Steve Borzick was ac- 
cepting what every player has to accept at some time or 
another. That is, tlie end of the playing career. 

"I'm going to miss it I've made a lot of great friends on 
this team/' Bondck said. 

Boizick was going up for a pass in a contest against Sl 
Louis. The Renegades' defender and the veteran Vikings 
secondary man collided going for the ball. Borzick found 
himself in agony on the 45-yard-line at Round Lake senior 
high. 



'Cats 



"A lot of the players visited me right away in the hospi- 
tal," Borzick, a 1989 Waukegan East graduate, said 

No. 45 underwent surgery for an ankle a few hours later 
after finding three breaks and one dislocation, ending his 
season. Somewhat fittingly, the cast has Chicago Bears 
stickers on iL 

Vikings Coach Russ Kraly knows, even after a 49-0 win 
over the hapless Chicago Thunder, Uiat the Vikcs will miss 
the three-year player. 

The secondary played well but was not leaily challenged. 
We're going to miss Borzick. We'll miss him next week (at 
Milwaukee Sept. 6) or against Racine or Palos. It will 
come home to haunt us. Scott Bams stated. It will basi- 
cally be a whole new thing," Kraly said. 

While Borzick was not in the lineup, others stepped for- 
ward. Maik Van GuUden. a Orst-year player, recorded a first- 



quarter safety. Arlo Miller had six tackles for tosses. 

Offensively, a fourth-quarter touchdown run by Garrctl 
Horn ended close-but-no cigar string. The one-yard run was 
set up by a 22-yard jaunt by Horn. 

"Garrett has looked great for us all year. Every time he 
carries the ball, he has the potential to break it away. It fi- 
nally paid off. With any luck, he should have had three or 
four touchdowns by now," Kraly said. 

Remaining Vikings games: Saturday, Sept. 12, 
Racine Raiders, 6 p.m. at Roimd Lake High; Saturday, 
Sept. 19. Palos-Orland Park Force, 6 p.m. at Round Lake 
High; Saturday, Sept. 28 at Gary Golden Bears, 7 p.m., 
Gilroy Stadium; Saturday, Oct. 3, ai Racine Raiders, 7 
p.m.; Saturday, Oct 10, Milwaukee Express, 6 p.m. at 
Round Lake High; Saturday, Oct. 17, at Chicago Thunder, 
7 p.m. at Hanson Stadium. 



(Continued from Page 8) 

our leading receiver last year. I feel he will probably be one 
of the better ones in the conference," Christensen said. "And 
senior running back Mike Larsen has developed in a year's 
time to be a viable contender to carry the ball very well for 
us." 

Though Warren and Stevenson will be "big contenders, 
the favorites," Christensen said he has some new weapons 
this year. Besides, the coaches concentrate on their own 
team's progress. 

"We concentrate on ourselves rising to a new plateau ev- 
ery week and stress to the boys the real intricacies of foot- 
ball," Christensen said. 



Knights gain lead, hold on for win 



Lake County Knights built a three-touchdown lead then 
held on for a 21-14 semi-pro football win over the Chicago 
Chargers at Triton College. 

The win gives the Knights a 2-1 record heading into a 
game against the Chicago Panthers at Hanson Stadium, 
Fullerton & Central in Chicago Chicago on Sept 6. Kick- 
off is set at 3:30 p.m. 

Earlier, the Knights won a forfeited game by the Broncos 
but lost to the Indiana Untouchables 13-0. 

The always-tough defense scored the first TD against the 



Chargers on a fumble recovery in the end zone by Eric 
Disch. 

Dave Ayers caught 30-yard pass from quarterback Gordon 
Biuner for the second TD for a 14-0 halftime lead. 

Bittner ran for a IS-yard touchdown for a 21-0 lead in the 
third quarter. 

Chicago scores came on a 10-yard run in the third quarter 
after a deflected pass kept the drive alive. David Hudgcns 
tallied on a 47-yard pass from ClaudcU Robertson and Eric 
Mesko scored the other TD on a seven-yard TD pass. 



"Have An Outstanding Season" 

GrayslaKe 





Rt. 83 & Center St., Grayslake ^ ^ 



OPEN X4 HOURS 



Cash or Credit Same Low Price! 

C708) 223-3220 



flII Suburban 

LIMOUSINE SERVICE INC. 



1415 Cedar Lake Rd., Suite 105 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

708-740-9300 

708-473-9300 

708-395-1967 



I 



Have a Winning Season! 



FORD • LINCOLN • MERCURY 



Biggest Selections 
BEST DEALS! 

From Economy to Luxury, Lyons & Ryan has the largest 

selection of new and used cars! 

104 Rte. 173 • Antioch, minois 

(TOO) 3B5-3900 



Friday, S«pt«mb«r4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 12B 



.-^; 






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m. 

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me 

10 p.m. 
p.m. 
30 p.m. 
p.m. 
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p.m. 
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Ime 
:30 p.m. 
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;30 p.m. 

p.m. 

p.m. 
:30 p.m. 
:30 p.m. 



►y Gairctl 
drun was 

y time he 
way. It fi- 
d three or 



Sept. 12, 
Saturday, 
)undLake 
s, 7 p.m., 
Haiders, 7 
6 p.m. at 
) Thunder, 






le by Eric 

ck Gordon 

l. 

lead in the 

tird quarter 
d Hudgens 
>n and Eric 
lass. 



«i 



the largest 
S 



papers 12B 



Lakeland Newspapers 



NOTICES 



.','jj« 



Obituaries 



■^^ 



BARONE 

Frank F. Barone, 76 
of Antioch. Arr: 
Strang Funeral Home, 
i| Andoch, 
I BURNETT 
-| Kenneth R. Burnett, 54 
^ of Charleston, West 
I Virginia, formerly of 
i$ Libertyvillc. Arr: 
7 Bumctt-Danc Funeral 
;| Home, LibCTtyville. 
f GAMRATH 
I Edna M. Gamradi, 87 
of Libertyville, 
formerly of Algona, 
WI. Arr: Burnett- 
Dane Funeral Home, 
Libertyville. 
GERNHARDT 
Frederick Charles 
Gernhardt. 67 of 
Newport Richey, FL, 
formerly of 

Libertyville. Arr: 
Private. 
GROSS 

Mildred M. Gross, 77 
of Lake Zurich. Arr: 
Ahlgrim and Sons 
Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich. 
HANSEN 

Robert CI Hansen, 65 
of Gumee. Arr: Marsh 
Funeral Home, 
Gumee. 
HATHAWAY 
Janet E. Hathaway, 48 
of Libertyville. Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libertyvillc. 
JENSEN 

Dorothy L. Jensen, 71 
of Antioch. Arr: 
Private. 
KOCAL 

Anton Kocal, 98 of 
North Chicago. Arr: 
The Salata Funeral 
Home, North 

Chicago. 
MAUER 

Fritz Mauer, 87 of 
Vernon Hills, Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libertyvillc, 



^ 



1^^8 



PRICE 

Loretta A. Price, 72 of 
Round Lake Beach. 
Arr: Private. 
ROWLEY 
Marion F. Rowley, 78 
of Antioch. Arr: 
Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch. 
SNIDER 

Ramond R. Snider, 63 
of Lindcnhurst. Arr: 
Marsh Funeral Home, 
Gumee. 
SZPICKI 

Mitchell J. Szpicki, 
73 of. Antioch. Arr: 
Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch. 
WASNIEWSKI 
Alexander 
Wasniewski, 82 of 
North Chicago. Arr: 
The Slalata Funeral 
Home, North 

Chicago. 
WASSON 

Michael Brian 

Wasson, 26 of 
Cannon Air Force 
Base, New Mexico, 
formerly of Lake 
Villa, Round Lake 
and Gurnee. Arr: 
Marsh Funeral Home, 
Gumee. 
WEGNER 
Ada Barnstable 
Wcgner, 81 of 
Wautoma. WI, 

formerly of Lake 
Villa. Arr: Strang 
Funeral Home 

Antioch. 



The Deadline 

for Obituaries 

& Death 

iNotlces Is 5 PM, 

on Tuesday. 



in 



CfCHcma^ xjrunef(cU^na^iBl, Jz^. 




tttJU^titi 



Fourth Generation Family offering 
sincerity sensitivity Si. con\fort in your 
time of need. 

We work with your best interest in 
mind to help ease your burden. 

We encourage you to learn more about 
your options. It's never too early. 
Inquiries are always welcome. 



•Pre «iT«ngementt 
•Veterani At Social 
Sccuritj BcneDts 
•Air Shipping Service 
•Tuc Free Tnut 



•Uedlcal Science 
•PubUc Aid 
•Direct Cremation 
•Fore Thought 
Insiuance Plan 
•Payment Plana 



Tersoitd caring for over 90 years 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Grayslake 

223-8122 



(708)223-8161 




Personals 




DONATIONS ARE BEING 

accepted for the Native 
American Indians {from the 
film Dances with Wolvss), 
Soutfi Dakota. Pick-up 
avaitabfe. Any clothing or 
miscellaneous items always 
appreciated. Contact Jean 
(815)675-6610. (Spring 
Grove). Anything loft from 
Garage or Rummage sales 
accepted. 

A(\.nn.nnfn 
LOOKING FOR FORMER 
Lake Bluff oq>hanage resident 
James Blakney. Last known in 
Long Lake/I ngleslde area In 
1946. Please call with any 
information (aiS}39e-838g. 



LOST: BLACK AND WHITE 

ShI-Tzu, small, male puppy. 
Last seen In vidnity of Rollins 
and Cedar Lake Rds. Round 
Lake Beach, Saturday A.M. 
(8/29). Very scared! Has 
Indiana tags. Please call 
(708)740-9183. 

2-37-103 




vSiShteeSIS 

NEEDED 

Lakeland Newspapers 

is looking for readers 

and non-readers to join 

us for a Focus Group 

at our office in 

Grayslake. Spend 

about an traur with us 

and share your 

opinions about 

newspapers. 

If interested, call 

Eizabeth 

(708)223-8161 

Ext 139 




NOTICE 

TO 

ADVERTISERS 

Plow dtack your td on Ik 
FIFtST InMrtcn dM*. In tia •venl 
ol an wtof u oir^lnion, via vM be 
rMfonW* la OKtY r* FIRST In- 
conact IrtMrfsn. Th< fi«— p «pw 
«■ ba iMpcntibto kx at*/ It* por. 
tan ol tw ad tiil It b ancr. PlaaM 
noMy tM CiMsIM OapaitnanI in 
tta avanl ol m anor. CANCEUA- 
TIONS mu«l ba mada prior to 5 
pjn. on Wm Tuaaday tMlora 
puWealoa 

Ldtalmd Natvapapara raaarvat 
IM rl^t 10 propartr daaaily al 
advartakig, adl or d^ata tny ob- 
tadonitila amiSng. or lajaet any 
advwivnani lor cradl or poUcy 
raaaona. 

M Hiip WanM ftdvvllaing l« 
putNriiad undar urilad haa<lnga. 
LaWand Naarapipara doaa not 
IVHMinBlr iocipl ha^ tmM ad- 
vailtlng ral In any way vWMar, 
l>)a Hun«i F«ghti A(t 



PcrBonala 



FREE ROOM AND BOARD- 

In exchange for taking care of 
my 84yr. old father. Small 
ssdaiy also provided. Must 
have prior experience, 
excellent references and be 
able to cook. Patience and a 
kind heart esaentfal. You will 
live on a beautiful 5 acre estate 
with use of Iruide, year round 
swimming pool, spa, sauna, 
basketball/iennis courts and 
many other amenities. 
(708)356-8200 or (708)356- 
8209 after 5pm. 

4-37-96 

ADOPTION- A LOVING 

ALTERNATIVE. A full lime 
mom and professional dad 
wouM k»ve ID offer your baby a 
suburban home, extended 
family including adoptive 
ooualna, a college education, 
and a happy home to grow up 
In. Nelghtiorhood parks and 
pooli, family vacations and 
trips to the zoo are waiting. 
Medical/LegalCounseltng 
pakf. CaatotalkormeoL Lucy 
and John, collect (706)965- 
87B3. 

4-30-101 
ADOPTION- DEAR BIRTH 
I^THER, I just celebrated my 
3fd birthday. When I blew out 
the candles, I wished for a 
baby brother or sister. 3 years 
ago, wf^en my parents adopted 
me, their wish camo true. 
Please help all of our wishes 
and dreams come true by 
calling our attorney al 
(708)957-6846 Legai/Medlcal 
and Counseling paid. 
Informatkin confiden'Jol. 
4-4M52A3 

CHRISTIAN DATING and 

Friendship Service. For 
information packet call 1-800- 
829-3283. 

4-38-1 



ADOPTION: HI. Hy nams 
It. David and Tm a great little 
kid that would love to have a 
brother or sister to grow up 
with. My Mom and Dad have a 
great house and you can even 
have my old room. I would 
share all my toys, my dog. 
Bozo, and even my NInja 
Turtles. Please give our 
attorney Glenna a collect call 
at (217)352-8037. 

4-36-1 04/G 

ADOPTION: WARM, FUN 

loving couple want to love, 
cherish, nuture and protect 
your baby. Happily married 8 
years with targe close knit 
family. Let us help make your 
dreams for your child come 
true. Call Linda and Tom 
collect (706)259-2526. 
4-37-1 5M3 




PROTESTANT 
CHURCH 

6th Annual Auction 

Sat. Sept. 12 

Noon- 5 pm 

Viewing Begins At 

11 am 

Church Grounds 

Whitney & Park St. 

Grayslake 
For more informa- 
tion or to donate an 
Item , call the 
Church at 

(708) 223-8131 



Finaricial 




• f • 



Funeral planning* 
makes it easier 



for those you love. 




Forethought^ funeral 
planning"... 

Do it today, not tomorrow. 
Toj^ether, not alone. 



* Funded lliriiujih ptificics I'mni 
Foreihnuiihl Life Insunince Company 



I^Uk^ mat, . . aa/!f 




, ••^^, ff3(<yt4/o» /A* SBiM " 



12 N. PIstakee Lake Road, Fox Uke, Illinois 
Phone: (706) 587-2100 • (815)385-1001 



Auctions 



B 



Auctjons 





County of Lake 

AUCTION 

Saturday, September 12-10 A.M. 



New Location: 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Routes 45 & 120, Grayslake, IL 



Unclaimed/Confiscated Police Property 

Surplus Local Governmanl Property 

61 Cars • 32 Trucks 

.150 Bicycles * Construction Equipment 

Office Equipment * Radios * Tools 



Terms: Complete Payment Day of Sale- Cash or 
Check. All Sales Final. All Items "As Is - Where Is". 
Inspection & Reglstratlon:gA.M.DayofSale. 
Vehicle Inspection: 2-4 P.M. Fri., September 1 1 tb. 
Participating Agencies: Countyof Lake, Lake 
County Forest Preserve District, Antioch Township. 
Village of Gurnee, City ol Highland Pa*. Village of 
Lake BluU. Village of Libertyville, Village of 
Lindenhurst. Newport Township. City of North 
Chicago, Village of Round Lake, Village of Round 
Lake Heights, and Village of Vernon Hills. 

FREE PARKING - FREE ADMISSION 
NO BUYER'S PREMIUM 



Lake County Purcfiasing Department 
Call 708/360-6696 lor Free Brochure 




llelpWanled 
Pan-Time 



EASY MONEY* 

TELEMARKETING. No 
experience necessary, will 
train, pan-time evenings. Earn 
$5 to $8per hour. Call Troy 
after 3pm Mon-Fri. (708)91&- 
7734. 

19-41-5 




LAKE COUNTY FOR - 
CLOSURE Report Data for 
the Investor to obtain weekly 
report Call (708)855-8515 
7-35n"F-98 

YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



STORE HELP 

for 

BAKERY 

Afternoons 

Apply In Person 

Lovin Oven 

651 Railroad Avenue 

Round Lake, IL 60073 



llelpWanled 
Pan-Time 



ENJOY A COST FREE 
CHRISTMAS by working 

Part-time hours with full time 
payl Free training, no delivery. 
Also booking parties. No 
obligation. Call LaDonna 
708)746^10. 

19-36-Oa/G 
FULL OR PART TIME 
Industrial and Automotlva 
Hardwve, Chemicals, etc. A 
great opportunity tor hard 
worker will train. For more 
Information call Maintenance 
Products INC. 1-800-523- 
2367.E.O.E. 

19-00-00 






BAKERY DRIVER 

Days, Afternoons 

& Early Evenings 

Apply In Person 

Lovln Oven 

651 Railroad Avenue 

Round Uke, IL 60073 



*** t* 1 1 



TTT 



EXPANDING 

TELEMARKETINC 

COMPANY 

Opening In 
Round Lake BmcH 

Seeks enthusiastic P 

peopte for fund 

raisJn0/i6ale&/:appt 

making. 

Work part-tinw 

12-4or4-apm. 

No axperlenea neceaaary 

Will train 

Call for more 

Infonnation 

(708) 63S-1070 [ 



goSSQ 



IIEUP 

Part-time worker for ooneral 
deaning at Private Show Dog 
Kennel In the Grayslake Area. 
3-4 hours per day late after- 
noons & early evenings. Must 
be avallatka weekends. 
Perfect for High School or 
College Student 

CaUt 

(708) S46-S230 

Between 4 & 7 p.m. 



DENTAL 

ASSISTANT 

Part Time 

If you are a caring, 

quallHed and 

experienced pn^fesskinal, 

seeking a warm profasfinnal 

environment 

dedKated to excstlence, 

Contact 
Dr. Humboldt's office 

(708) 249-5700 

Gamee 



NEWS 

CORRESPONDENTS/STRINGERS 

Lakeland Newspapers has openings on 
its expanding editorial staff for news 
correspondents, stringers, business 
writers, feature writers and 
ptiotographers. Will handle a variety of 
assignments. Must be able to meet 
deadlines. Contact: 

Daniel M. Becker, Managing Editor 

Lakeland Newspapers 

(708)223-8161 



■r.\ 



iQkekind Newspapers 27 






M'MM I iiii>> » i i< r ,..^ 



(%N 



Lakeland Newspapers 



I '» . •-* » ■ *■ ■ 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



(708)223-8161 



i 



Ih 






i 

■ ** 



■' 



ir:': 



..'■) 










EMPLOYMENT 



HelpWanted 
Part-Time 



Wt 



HelpWanted 
Pan-Time 




GENERAL OFFICE 

•Answer Phones 
•Light Typing 

•Some data entry & Inquify 

Full Time 

2-3 Months 

Lake Forest 

Accent 

(708) 918-8367 



0PT1CIIIN5 



Part Time 

Flexible Hours 

Experienced 

or will train 

(708)888-7200 

Ask (or Slan 



GRANDMA 

NEEDED 

HELP! 

I We need someone | 

to help us tend to 

Infants in our 

Gurnee dental 

[office, for Mondays I 

and Tuesdays, 

PleaMCallt 

1(708)244-19X51 

AsfcSorCberyL 



WANTED! 

Relirad or semi-relired 
person In good health 
needed for some light 
lanilofiai duties. Basic 
mainlsnance wlih some 
light lining required. No 
experience needed, just a 
desire to do a good job. 
15 10 20 houfs per week, 
can bs lloxibfe lo fit your 
schedule. For Interview 
appointmenl, please call 

BUI Scfiroeder, Jr. 

LAKEUND NEWSWPERS 
(708)223-8161 



NOW HIRING 

CHRISTMAS 

AROUND THE 

WORLD 

DEMONSTRATORS 
IN YOUR AREA 

No Investmont. 

Now accepting 

tnokings for parties. 

$50 free merchandise 

for hosting. 

For More 

Information Call: 

(708) 726-2441 



ACCOUNTS 
RECEIVABLE 
COLLECTOR 

Part-time, flexible 
hours. Telephone oo\- 
lection experience 
necessary. Basic 
bookkeeping helpfut 
ideally, an indepen- 
dent, self-starter will 
I be the right person for 
this position. Call Bill 
Schroeder Jr. for 
interview appoint 
nfent. Lakeland News 
papers. 

708-223-8161 



EARN UP TO 

$10/HR. 
TALKING ON 
THE PHONE! 

If you enjoy talking on 

the phone, and would 

like lo get paid for it, we 

have openings in our 

telemarketing 
department. We offer 

part-time evening 

hours, pleasant working 

conditions, and training. 

If interested please 

contact 

Ann Roberts or 

Bob Schroeder at 

(708) 223-8161 



Kitchen 
Help 

Rotating 
Weekends 
& Holidays 

Will train 
Apply In Person: 

HILLCREST 

NURSING 

CENTER 

t740 N. Cifcuil Drive 
Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

Part Time Help 
Needed In our 

NEW CAFETERIA 

Hours 11:15-2:00 

Applications 

Available 

in 

Grant High 

School 

Genera) Office 

I Grant Community 

Higti School 

I285E. Grand Ave. 

Fox Lake, IL 

60020 

School Hours 

8:00 -3:00 



llclpWanicd 
Parl-Timc 




BANQUET 
BARTENDER 

{Part Time) 
Apply In Person 

Andres 

(sis) 678-2671 



OFFICE 
HELP 

Laborworld USA 

in 
Round Lake Park 

a leader in the 
temporary help in- 
dustry is looking for a 
bilingual individual to 
perfonn various office 
duties to include 
customer service. 
Must be able to deal 
with large groups of 
people and work 
flexible hours. 
Salary & Benefits 

Catl For Appointment 

(708)249-9001 

Ask for Mike 



Lakeland 
Hewspapers, 

Lake County's fastest grow 
Ing group of weekly news 
papers, Is seeking a 

TELEMABKirnNG 
SUPERVISOR 

The candidate will be 
responsible tor a siatt ol 10-15 
part tima lelemarkelers. 
Responslbitllies include hiring, 
training, meeting depanmenta 
quotas and will rapon directly to 
General Manager and Classified 
Manager. Hours are M-Th 5-B 
and Saturdays 10-2. If you ara 
professiondl, energetic, creative 
and enjoy variety, we are 
interested In talking to you. 
Please send resume or caJI 
UKELAND NEWSPAPERS 
30 S. WhHn«y St., Graytloke 
(708) 223-8161 



i-^a 







THE CLASSIFIEDS 



ADVERTISE YOUR ABILITIES. 

MARKET YOUR TALENTS. 

DESIGN YOUR FUTURE. 

Our company creates and produces advertising, 
graphic design projects, and marltetlng communica- 
tions for all types of clients. 

We're looking for someone who wants to be 
involved in sales and business development 
starting on a part time basis (20 hours a wael^). 

Tfie person we're thinking of understands what 
it means to be professional in their approach 
to business. It's someone who can work indepen- 
dently, but also believes in the importance of 
teamwork. It's someone who can get excited about 
contributing to the growth of a young company. 

If you feel you're the person we're looking for, and 
would like a chance to grow with us, let us hear 
from you. send your resume to: 
John Schlavone 



Logo -ago go 




^dvcrllslng/craphlc SrrvlcL'i 

P.O. Box 7766 Graysfake, (L 60030. 



llitipWuiiicd 
Kill I -'I' inn*. 



^0 




DRIVERS- GO TO WORK 

Immediately. Roadrunner 
Distributions Services, Inc. TX: 
1 -800-285-8267 Competitive 
pay, new conventionals, 
Medical/Dental/Vacation etc. 
Sign on BONUS. EOE. 

20-00-OQ . 
FRIENDLY HOIME 

PARTIES has openings for ' 
demonstrators. No cash 
invoatiTienL No sen/ice charge. 
High commission and Hostess 
awards. Two catalogs, over 
600 Items. Call 1-800-488- 
4875. 

_ 20-00-00 

CARPENTERS AND 
LABORERS Wanted: wi&i own 
transportation. If you are a 
dependable person, doesn't 
mind working hard, please call 
Block Roofing and Siding at 
(708)740-4923, weekdays, 
after 8pm or after 2pm on 
weekends. 

2.0.37-109 
OWNER OPERATORS 
NEEDED for new dedicated 
Central Nebraska lo 
Milwaukee round trip loads. 
Grand Island Express, a 25- 
year old stable growing 
refrigerated carrier. (800)444- 
7143. 



HelpWanted 
Fuil-Timc 



FULL OR PART TIME 

Industrial and Automotive 
Hardware, Chemicals, etc. A 
great opportunity for hard 
worker will train. For more 
information call Maintenance 
Products INC. 1-800-523- 
2367. E.O.E. 

.-20.-fl£bQ0 ... _ 
M W T DRIVERS NEEDED. 

Top Pay, good benefits. 1 yr. 
variable experience or scliool 
and Smonihs OTR. CDL 
W/Ha2mat. 1-800-888-6824, 
1-800-777-5255. 
„_ . 20-00-00 
DRIVERS . MINIMAL 
unloading. 1 year PTR 
expefience, 401 K, profit 
sharing, Bonuses. Run 
Midwest, South, Southeast, 
t^ome 7-14 days. HEARTLAND 
EXPRESS, INC. (800)441- 
4G63, 

2000-00 
TRUCK OWNER 

OPERATORS. $2,000 sign-on 
bonus for drivers with emonihs 
experience. Tractor purchase 
plan available. Teams 
welcome. High Value Products 
(Electronics) Division of 
northAmerican Van Lines. 1- 
600-234-3112, Dept. FfiOS. 

20-00-00 




HelpWanted, 
Full-Time 

TRUCK DRIVERS^ BE 

horn* most nights and 
weekends. The intemodal 
hauling division of 
northAmerican Van Llr>es has 
opportunities for 

owner/operators lo provide 
drayage In the Chicago area. 
WE OFFER: 92« per mile for all 
dispatch directed book miles, 
(loaded, empty or bobtail); $30. 
for each loaded trailer picked 
up or delivered at customer 
facility: time home thru the 
week as well as weekends: 
$500. bonus for bringing In 
your own tractor that meets 
our specifications. Tractor 
purchase programs available. 
YOU hAiST: be at least 23 with 
6 months to 1 year tractor 
driver experience, meet DOT 
and safety qualifications 
including DOT physical and 
substance abuse test. Call 1- 
800-348-2191. Ask for Dept. 
R137. 

20-00-00 
DRl'VERS-OTR DRIVERS 
$30,000 per year (no 
experience necessary) Call 
(800)2JB-HUNT The Best Run 
For The Money. EOE/Subject 
to drug saeen. 

%-00-00 




HelpWanted^^.. 

Full-Tlme 

DRIVERS TAKE A turn for 
th« bBlter...T6p pay. miles, 
and excellent equipment from 
a company that puts people 
first. Call (B00}423-7629 
MUNSON Transportation. 
EOE. 

2000-00 



INSURANCE SALES 

Gtound level oppalunlly wifi a haleinol 

Intuionce rampony sipanding In this 

Isirltofy. Immtdiato (oloty « comrrjulpnt 

will 3 ytai (joining piogfom « rraifwig»m»nl 

oppaiunileB wfien quolifiMl. QtwUliBd 

spp^iconU Hind lecums lo; 

Crdg John ton 

CiHmHc Knlghu Iniurinoa Soetely 

»2S Bultarflald Ro(d f316W 

OiK Brook. 1160521 



SNOWPLOW 
BOBCAT 

OMierOperatHB. 

Needed by NorihshorB confiany. 

Top Pay, Pd gas, guar, hours, pleiity 

of won(, no waitlor your mooeyl 

C708) X7^1747 



Mbuquaqw, NU. PuUo 8<h<Kia M*« 
tw Wonrlng tpplcarti. 8p«w*i 

LaiguagA'nwriipM 

\.i yn m^, PTi/APSa M^>. 

CmkKSa SLPfJPT* (APS} cM Anna 

Z«nora (SOS) 042^790. Mt. Can*Mta 

SUPMTt edi ttoynv Oomkia (SOS) 

S4i-3742. A(|)lc«i» muitba tUg. lor 

nmt.b/twHtmllmicaWmOtpL 

o< Ed. FU !>«», ouHMidkig Ml. EOe 



eH.^SSlV'lEn OUIDE 



Kenosha 
County 

•Bristol 



Rich 




Cook Cotutty 



AKI^OCIVCEMDem^ MARKET GUIDE KEW EOTAW 



No<ic«e 1 

IjCMtA Found 2 

Frw a 

P«nQrt«I« 4 

Auction* 5 

Butlnou Pwsoful* a 

finandal 7 

EMPU>T9IE9nr 

Ha^ Wanted Pa/l-Tlme 18 

hMp Wanted Ful-Tlrra 20 

Errptoymen! AqbocIm 2t 

Bu»l(>«u Opporlunlles 22 

Wok Wanted 23 

Child Care 24 

SchooVlnetructlon 26 

MARKErl* GUIDE 

AntlquM 30 

Appltancas 31 

Ba/1»r/Trade 32 

Bozaan/CradlA 33 

BuUlngMalertaM 34 
Bu«lr»eB/Ottlce Equipment 35 

El8Clronica/Conpular« 36 

FannOutd« 37 

FIrewwxl 38 

Gota^je/Rummaoe Salec 40 



OoodTTiir)eatoect 41 

HoriM A Ta* 42 
Hou««hold Qoodt^umkura 43 

I.Bwn/Q«rd«n 44 

Mluelanaoi)* 4S 

Medical EqulfVSuppSfla 45A 

Musical in^trumentt 46 

Pata a SuppJiM 47 

Tooto & Machinery 48 

Wanted To Buy 40 



REALESTASE 

Homee Fof Sais SO 

Homee For Rent 51 

HonM Wanted 52 

Homes Builden 53 

CondaTcwn Homeo 54 

Moblte hlomee 55 

Apa/tmentf For Rent 56 

Apartmenta Wanted 57 

Apt>lome« To Share 68 

Boons For Rent 59 

Buaineaa Property For Sale 60 

Bualneta Property For Rem Bt 

Faimi 62 

Vacant Loti/Acreaee 63 

Reaofta/Vaiatlon Rentals 64 

Out ol Area Propedy 65 



CemetefyLolB 66 

Real Ettate Wanted 67 

Real Estate MiK. 68 

RECREAfnOIKAL 



Recrealtona] Vehtcloe 


70 


SnowmobJle/ATVs 


71 


8QaleA4clofs^t& 


72 


Camping 


73 


Travel^acatlon 


74 


Sports Equ^xnenl 


75 


Ahplanee 


76 



Cars For Sale 80 

RentalA-easas 81 

Classic/Antique Cars 82 

Servtoe & Pans 83 

Car Loansflneurance B4 

Vans 85 

Tmcki/Trallers 86 

Heavy Equlpmant 87 

Motorcycles 88 

Wanted To Buy 89 

SERVICE DDtECTORr 

SI 
S3 



AppllancM Repair 
Bladttop 



SQlVICEDIRECrORT 

BuHders S5 

Caipentry S7 

Ca/pet Cleaning S8 

Concrole/CeniBnl S9 

DryWafl S10 

EducalkxVlnslructkm S11 

Electrical 513 

Firewood S13A 

Handyman S14 

HaallnQ/AIr Condltlon]r>g SIS 

Housekeeping SI 6 

Landscaping • SI 7 

Laundry/Cioaning S1S 

Legal Sarvlcas S21 

Moving/Storage SS3 

Palnllng/Oeoorattng 825 
ParaLagaVTypIng Servlcea 826 

PlunMng S27 

Pooto S29 

Preesurs Washing S30 

Prdaselonal Servloee S31 

RadioHV Repair S33 

Remodeling S35 

Reeumee 337 

Rootlng^lding S39 

Storage S41 

Tax Servtoe S43 

Trees/Plants S4G 

Wedding S47 

Miscellaneous S49 



Lakeland's Classified Ads appear in all 14 newspapers witti a 

Readership of over 200,000 



HOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST Insort'on dale. In the event ol an error or omissbn. we will be responsfclo (or ONLY the FIRST Incorrocl 
Intenion. The newspaper will b& responsible for only the portion o( Ihe ad Ihal is In error. Please notHy the Cla&sKled Depadmont In the evoni ol an 
error wkhin 1 weelt o( run dado. CANCELLATIONS must be made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday twfore publicalion. 

Lakeland Newspapers reeervse the right to property claseKy all aiSienltlng. edk or delete any ob)ecilonable wording, or rejed any advertlsonnonl 
for credit or polk:y reasona. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified headings, Lakeland Newspapers does nol knowingly accept help wanted advanising that In 
any way violates Ihe Human Rights Act. 



Hours: Monday - Thursday 

8 A.M. - 8 P.M. 

Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - Noon 

DEADLINE: 

Wednesdays at 10 a.m. 



(708) 223-8161 

Fax.: (708) 223-8810 





Payment in advance is required 
for these ads: 

• Advertisers out of Lot^eland circulation area 

• BuslnosB Opportunltloa • MoUb Homos 

• SRuallom Wanted • Det)t DIsdalmets 

• Ga/ago and Moving Sales* 

*Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE, 

Wo pete wHI be consJdorod (or giveaway. 



26 Lakeland N«wspap«rs 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



\&ai^^silai^^ 



r «u^-'-«ijJ4i^ia4'«;fe-'r 








K turn for 

ay, mites, 
jrrent from 
uts people 
)423-7629 
portatlon. 



raw" 

itore. 

,'8 company, 
tioura, plenty 
ourmooeyj 

•1747 



nti.SpMdi 

■Sarbdip. 

M«,CCT**ckir 

mtlbaiilg.b 

ndlnguI.EOE 



E 



ing 



ECTORT 

ss 

S7 

S8 
S9 
S10 
S11 
S13 
S13A 
S14 
SIS 

sie 

S17 
S19 
S21 
S23 

sss 

rvlces S26 
S27 
S29 
S30 

I S31 
S33 
S35 
S37 

ssg 

S41 
S43 
S4S 
S47 
S49 



T Inooffod 
avenl at an 

•ortltdrrant 

GlnQlhal In 



REQUIRED 



culatlon area 
olla Homes 
iicfalnwre 

ue FREE. 




HelpWanted 
Full-Tim e 



ilcIpWantcd 
FuU-Timc 




$200-$500 WEEKLY 

Assemble products 

at home. Easy! No 

selling. You're paid direct. 

Fully Guaranteed. 

24 Hour Hotline. 

801-379-2900 

Copyright #IL55WDH 



SALES 

tit) a tralnmo] 

iruing in Ihis 
t commiutani 




. t manngernanl 
lad, Oualilied 
;um» la: 




an 

■nee Soclsly 

idiOICW 

0521 





SUBSTRUIfS 

Certificate 
Required 

Please Contact: 
Stanton School 

(TOS) 597-2535 



FLORAL 
DESIGNER 

Must be experienced 

Full and Part time 

,positions available 

Ralphs Florist 

(708)546-2185 

asK for Dave 



MULTVUNE 
RESIDENT CLAIM 

REPRESENTATIVE 

For northern Cook 

County suburbs and 

Lake County. Minimum 

3 years experience. 

Send resume to: 

Box CO 

c/o Lakeland 

Newspapora 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayalake, IL 60030 



•WAITRESSES 

*COOKS 
*HOSTESSES 

Full Tims Positions Available 

CHILI'S RESTAURANT 

567E.TownlIneRd. 

Vernon Hills, IL 

(708)680-0011 




%I% 



K 



Long term health 
care facility located 
in Long Grove, has 
need for a P.M. 
cook. 

Therapeutic cooking 
experience helpful, 
but will train. 
Contact Marta; 

(70B) 438-8275 

9a.m. - 4p.m. 
Mon. - FrI. 



TRAVEL U.S. 

FUN N SUN 

Hiring 20 people, 18 and 

over lo work major U.S. 

ciiies and resorts including 

Calilomia, Texas. Must be 

enthusiastic and ready to 
start immediately, 2 weeks 

all expense paid training. 
Return guaranieed. 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 
For an exciting position call 

Nettor 

t708) 2S6-880O, Ext. 136 
DaJly 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 



SEASONAL 

Help Wanted 

Apply In 

Person 

ORIOLE SPRINGS 
ORCHARD 

3611 6-1 26th Street 
Twin Lakes, Wl 

(414)877-2416 







TIME TO GO TO WORK? 
TIME TO COME TO KELLY* 

Outstanding Opportunities! 

Long and Short term temporary assignments available with 
Lake County's leading employers. We currently have a 
heavy demand for: 

• Secretaries/Administrative Assistants 
(with word processing skills) 

• Typists 

> RBcaptlonlsts/Swttchboard 
New employees who work 40 hours will receive a FREE 
Kelly wristwatch (with copy ol this ad). Kelly employees who 
refer applicant3 with the above skills will also recieve a free 
watchl Offer good thru Sept. 30 while supplies last. 
Call Today! 

KELLy&"e?^ 

Tilt lUtir Giff Pnfli 'Tilt Fim tti Tki SttC 

Waukegan 662-0770 • Liberty villa 367-1144 






Applk^ations also accepted In Wauconda by Appt. 



Not An Agency-Never A Fee! 



EOE 



^ 






^. M tnnn 



ADVERTISING SALES 



Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group, Is seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. Tt)e candidate will be responsible for fiekl 
sales calls, developing a key area In Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in Interpersonal 
communication, creativity and personal 
responsibility. The candidate must also be self 
motivated and able to work with minimal amount of 
supervision, enjoy variety and be able to handle 
multiple tasks. An automobile is necessary (gas 
compensation will be made.) If you are professional, 
energetic and possess all of the above 
^aracterlstk^ we are Interested In talking to you. A 
candidate should have previous sales experience. 
Please send resunra or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St 

Giayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



llelpWanlcd 
FuU-Timc 




HelpWanled 
FuU-Time 




hEAT-^ET 

web pressman wanted 

Harris Y 900 & V 15, Goss SSC. 3 

yrs m'n. exper., excel benafils, & 

cornpensallon f*g. Join A 

Winning Toam in Control FL. 

Paradiso, Sendrasume to: 

Trans-Conlinenlal Communlcatiora, 

Inc., 7576 BrokerngoOr.. 

Orlando. FL 32809 



BlRERSrSFFiCE 

•Answer Ptwnea 
■Light Typing 

•Some data entry & Inquiry 

Full Time ^ ' 

2-3 Months 

Lake Forest 

Accent < 

(708)9ia^67 



Subs are needed on 

a continued basis 

for District 187. 

Nurse needed for 

high school. 

Apply at: 

2000 Lewis Ave. 
North Chicago 



ROOFERS 

Needed In Wdiita KarB^s. Oer 300 
lotK so)d.tlSten&tl5A)ftforCornp. 
(HVOn & off for Shakes. Cal (316) 
943-19t9ask for E)onDiiJry or Russ. 
G^at Plains Roofng, 4700 W. hving, 
WcKla.KS 67209 




Fox Lake Is now 

hiring Its fall crew. 

Cashier and Kitchen 

positions open for day 

and night shift. Will 

work around fall 

schedules. 

APPLY IN PERSON 

BETWEEN 9 A.M.-11 A.iy|. 

OR 2 P.M. 5 P.M. 

20S.RTE. 12 

FOX LAKE, IL. 



SECRCTflRIES 

WORD PROCESSORS 

PC OPERHTORS 

All sytiems- IBM, Apple, 

Mac, Wo(d Perfect, 5.1, 

Miitl-Mate; MKmsott Word for 

Windows: Bxcei for Windows 

3.0; Lotus 1 ,2,3; Freelanoe, 

Haraard Graphics, D Base IV. 

Exceiett 

Pay 

Short and Lorig Term 

asslgnmentB. 

(708)244-0017 



SCHOOL AGE 
[LEilD COUNSELOR 

Joir> the top notch staff 
at Round Lako Park 

District Child 

Development Center. 

We are now hiring a 

schod age lead counselor. 

Applicant must be 21 

yrs. or okler with 2 yrs. 

of college with at least 

6 cre<£ts in or related to 

chiM care for school age 

children or at least 1 yr. 

experience working with 

school age children. Part 

time, Mon.-Fri. 2:30 to 

6 p.m. $6,25/hour. 

Ajaply in Person 

ROUND LAKE AREA 

PARK DISTRICT 

814 Hart Road 

Round Lake. IL 



Mundelein High School 
1350 W.Hawley Street 

Mundelein, ILG0060 
3 positions available 



2 Instructional Aids 



4 hour position & 
7 hour position 
CONTACT: 

Mrs. Carol Porter 
(708) 949-2252 



Switchboard 



8 hours per school day 

6:15 a.fn.- 2:30 p.m. 

CONTACT: 

Mr. John Davis 
(708) 949-2199 




■^ 



How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Ql Dear..,SatTc}t, Last month my employer decided to relocate 
bis coqwnttoa to loolher state, leaving me and all but 3 co- 
workers without jobs. I liave registered witb my local 
UDcmptoymeat ofnce aod ibe slight iocome helps, I have been on 
an avid search and am findiag it difGcuIl to find a job right now 
and so I have hem couidenag pickiiig up some temporary woifc 
m the mean time. I figure ifais will allow me the flexibility (o 
interview for jobs while earing some money. My question is, will 
this cfTect my unemployment benefits if I do? B,H, - Fox Ijdce. 

A: Dear B.H., You will want to check with the unemployment 
representative you registered with. Typically the stale would love 
to see you get a new job whether it be permanent or temporary. 
For your general knowledge, if you take on a temporary 
assignment you are able to earn a percentage of your weekly 
benefits without it affecting your status. In some cases once an 
assigmncnl would be finbhed, you may be required to re-file for 
benefits. Work is work, and the more exposure in the work place 
plus the possibility of a temporary assignment leading to 
something permanent, certainly does outweigh the slight 
inconvenience of re-filing. 

Q: Dear...Search, Almost 1 year ago today I took a 3 month 
medical leave of absence from my company for which 1 have been 
employed 6 yean. During my al>sence my boss left the company 
and wis replaced by someone btemal. I came back to fbd I now 
report to someone who I never really got akwg witL I should be 
up for a review soon and find it difficult lo believe thai I will be 
looked upon objectively and tbcrtfore feel that perhaps I should 
go to our pcnonnci dcpaitraenl and request my review be done by 
someone else. Do you agree? F.R. - Libcrtyville 

A: Dear F.R., Slow downIM Rnt of all you do not mention 
whether or not you have been approached about this review. It 
sounds as ibou^ you are assuming quiu: a bit and expecting the 
wontl Penonilly speaking I would let nature lake it's course and 
se« what happens. Your feeling may or may not be justified. 
However, going over your bosses head and straight to the 
personnel dquitment at Ibis time would be a big mistake. TnJst 
mel 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed penonnel professional and 
Piesidenl of Superior Pcnonnci in Gumec 
Letters can be sent to Nancy c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 
P.O. Box 268. Grayslake, IL 60030 



ilelpWantcd 
FuU-Time 




HelpWaniedj 
FuH-Time 




ilelpWanledj 
Full-Time 



PREiSSMEN WEB OFFSET 

American Inline, one of the fast 
growing Direct Mail Corrpan/s In 
the mfdwosi, located in Se/mour, 
Indiana seeks an exper'd peraon 
In the operation ot two web (ullsize 
& hallsiza tour color Web OHset 
Perfecting Presses. tn-Llne 
tinishing experience a definite *. 
Wo offer extensive benefits, 
competitive salary. Qualified 
candidates send resume to: 
American Inline, Personnel Dept., 
P.O, Box 385, Seymour, IN. 
47274. 



M 



•BARTENDER 
(full timo) 
•WATT PERSON 
.A.II.BACKWArTER 
•A.M. BUSER 

Elder's MIU 
Restaurant 
Rlchmoiul 

(815) 678-2841 



TELENHRKETINO 

$6.00-$7.00 per hour. 

Flexible hours 

for that working 

parent or high 

school seniors. 



^^^uperlor Jten o Ana L 

(708) 244-0016 



IS 21 

SPANISH 

SPEAKING 

SUPERVISOR 

Janitorial company 
is lool<ing for a 

Spanish speaking 

supervisor, for 

Kenosha area. 
Contact: 

(708) 453-8200 

12 51 



J-'n i ~ i ~ i '" i r i ~ » ~r B ~ t 

EXPi 



EXPERIENCED 

AUrO DETAILER 

at 

Biif]r 8ho|i 

s^dailjr 

Call: 

Joe Johnson 

At 

Sandy Mckie Chrysler 

Plymouth 

91 S. Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL. 

C70«> S46-M7X 



ASSISTANT 

TO THE 
EXECUTIVE 
SECRETARY 

ProoressivQ bng-termcaro 

fadity In I or^ Grove b soeHng a 

dedicaied and maiure peison lo 

pmMa assistance to the 

Executive Secretary. 

The right cantSdale must have 

organizatkmal shilb, abtfty to 

type and en{oy a vajic«Y ot (Uiies. 

Hours are 1 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., 

Mon.-FrL We offer excetient 

beneftts and competilfye saia/y. 

It you find worHM in a care 

laciiiy rewanf ng, ths is the right 

job for you. 

ComactPilt 

(708)43a-«Z7S 

Mond^- Friday 

9ajn.-5pjii. 



|MANUMCTUR1NG$ 

ISHlPPINGmECEMNGl 
! Position Available 



Immediately. 
Experience 

required. 
Non-smoking 

company. 
Contact: 



I Imperial Stamp 
I & Engraving 
S 1280 Kyle Ct. 
S Wauconda, IL , 



QYMNflSTKS 
INSTRUCTOR 

Must be 

available to 

teach on Monday 

afternoons and 

Saturdays 

Call: 
(708)M64S58 




PART TIME 
ARTS AND CRAFTS INSTRUCTOR 

Design and implement arts and crafts 

activities to promote positive and 

creative forms of self-expression for 

emotionally disturbed/devetopmentally 

delayed youth. Experience working 

with emotbnally disturt>ed chiklren 

preferred. Associate Arts Degree, 

record keeping, and writing skills 

required. Approximately 25 hours per 

week. Benefits include paid vacatton, 

sk* time, holWays, health insurance, 

etc. $6.15 - 7.84 per hour. Please 

send resume or apply in person: 

ALLENDALE ASSOCIATION 

P.O. Box 108S 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 

(708) 356-2451 

EOEUyF 



EXPLORE 

THE 
MOUNTAIN 

GANDER MOUISTAIN IS GROWIJVG 
AND WE WOULD LIKE YOU TO GROW WITH US 

We are tooldng for Full-tiine and Part-tune 

RETAIL ASSOCIATES 

FOR OUR EXCITING NEW OUTLET SALES CENTER 

I We offer a variety of schedules to motivated individuals who 
enjoy working with people and have had some retail or 

cashiering experience. 

We offer competitive wages and excellent benefits 
(Many apply to part-time also) 



•Paid Vacations 
•Life Insurance 
• Dental Insurance 
•Merchandise Discount 
•401 K Savings Plan 
•Pay For Performance 



•Disability Pay 
•Medical Insurance 
•Paid Holidays 
•Education Assistance 
•Sick Pay 

•Employee Assistance 
Program 



Please Apply In Person, 

Our personnel oCTicc is open: Mon.-Fri., 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

P.O. Box 128, HWY W, WILMOT, WI 53192 




Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/DA^. 



ya 



Lakalarvl KswioaDers 29 



.rr 

- * 

■ ! 






\ 

it 




HelpWanted_^g, 
FuU-Timc ■* 



tzPOsmoNSt 

|C1IIU>CARE: 
I WORKERS i 

S Two poshlona are open. One $ 
J (or 2 year old classroom, and * 
* one (or 3 year old classroom. * 

S semeslBf hours In early chBd- * 
^ hood educallon required. ^ 
i, Good salary & benefits. * 

: RED BALLOON t 

it 



IIelpWanlGd_^l 
FuH-Timc 




« NURSERY SCHOOL : 
;36338WildwoodDr. 2 
: Lake Villa, IL * 
* Call Chris At * 
(708) 356-3895 



t (708) 356-3895 5 

ft****************** 



Local company seeks 
drivers lor their over 
the road division and 
local divisions. 
Reefer experience helpful. 
Bxcellent driving record 

a must 

Good pay plus benefits. 

Apply at: 

BIRCHWOOD 

TRANSPORT 

3111 152nd St. 

KENOSHA, Wl 

Mon.-Fri.8am-4:30pm 
EOE 



EXBCUTIVE 
DIRECTOR 

The Chair^O-Lokes Fox 

R'rver Watetway 
Management Agency b 

Eoeiking to hire an 
Executive Director. The 
Individual should 
poeeeeesorne 
engineering background. 
Preference will be given 

for regulatory and 

military experiertoe. The 

said Ageincy provides 

many benefits and a 

starting salary as per 

experience. Applicant to 

live in Lake or McHenty 

Counties preferably 

doee to the Chain-O- 

Lakes and Fox River 

areas and with 

knowledge of same. 

Please send job 

applicatkxis and 

resuPDesto : 

P.O. Box 461 
Fox Lake, IL 60020 
Attn: Jackie Ro«Ter 



M@ LIMIT 



GETTHINGS DONE 
IN THE 



Haw 

YOU CAN 



ir 



Bl 



MAINTENANCE ENGINEER 

Established far north suburban apartment 

community seeks individual experienced in HVAC, 

plumbing, electrical, and carpentry. Must be highly 

servk» minded and capable of leading a team. 

Experience with apartment maintenance helpful. 

Excellent benefils for Ihis detail oriented position. 

Sond Resume To: 

BoxDD 

e/o Lakoiand Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

GraysIako^lL 60030 



I 



Portrait Studio- 



Here's your opportuniv to work with one of the most naiionally 
recognized companies In the phoiography industry. Sears 
Portrait Studios are operated under license by CPI Corporation 
In over 900 locations. Full and Part time positions available, 
management opportunities. 

If you are creative, outgoing, talented with children and enjoy 
seeing the direct result of your work, this may be the job for you, 
Experience is not necessary. Ability to work with the public a 
must. Any previous experience In retail sales is an asset. 

We will provide a fully paid training program, competitive com- 
pensation, excellent benefits, and outstanding opportunities for 
career advancement. Put yourself In our picturel Please apply in 
person at Sears Portrait Studio Randhurst Center, Golf Mill 
Shopping Center, Hawihorne Center, Lakehurst Mall 
Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 



TELEMARKETING 



No Selling 

No Experience Necessary 

Benefits Plus Paid Vacation 

$6 per hour plus bonuses 

Room for Advancement 



eaBaBBBBBBBOHBBBBSHBHBSBBaBBBaBBaBBBSHaBa 

j FULL TIME REPORTER | 

I Lakeland Newspapers isS 
gexpanding its editorial staff and§ 
|looking for a full time reporter to 8 
gcover western Lake County.g 
jResponsibilities include coverings 
village board meetings in theg 
Round Lake and Grayslake areas asg 
well as taking photos. S 

We are looking for someone withg 
S enthusiasm, experience and ability S 

I "to meet deadlines. Please call 3 
Daniel M. Becker g 

B Managing Editor | 

g (708)223-8161 3 

BBBBaaBBHaBBaaBBBBQQgUBBgyQByaBBSQaBgflQBB 



HelpWanted 
Full-Time 



Fibre Fabricators 

7517 Meyers Road 

Spring Grove, IL 60081 





llclpWanlnd^— Ij 
Full-Tini4; 




Help Wanted 



Our forthcoming move to Spring Grove has 
created openings for the following positions: 
-Office Help 

-Puncti Press Set Up Person 
•Punch Press Operators 
•Material Handlers 
■Maintenance RAechanlc 
We will be accepting applications on 
SaturdaySept12,1992 
8:00 a.m.-l 1:00 a.m. 



TYPIST 
EXPERIENCED 

Responsible position requiring good typing and 

dictaphone skills. Short hand desirable, but not 

necessary. This is an interesting diversified job 

working with Sales, Order Entry, Credit, & 

Typing for Dept. Mgrs. 

Excellent salary, benefits, 

and profit sharing 

Please send resume or call for Interview 




aiHE GRIEVE CORPORATION 



INDUSTRIAL & LABORATORY OVENS 4 FURNACES 
SOO HART ROAD • ROUND LAKE, ILL. 60073 




BANKING OPPORTIMIES 



l^jKiuhou^aboUapplifngbaposilioniiiaoBaiM.toam-oreribd, ^ 
caring Inau^ Jreiuion? R », [ieaM cmuier f» iolb^ 

CLERKS 

ImmedUts U lirm opervigs lor irvfvkfaik iifi fixeeM 
wee and vert>al ard handiMitten Mnmnulion filois. Pw 
CRT badtj^iimd is a pks. We hm openngG In various (^Mftmota. 
A poston in Of Aooxiiing DepMlriKft requtK iteiion to detal and 
a N{|f) led of cQr4<krtj aSly quaKes and Qi^wiiencQ wi^ 
payrcl processing woUd be a plus. A posHion in oijr Uoitier Sei^ 
Depaitnent requim excdteri inteniersofd Ellis and irwoh^ 
degee of marnlMr contact by telephone. 

TELLERS 

Immediadle ful time openings for Individuals with t^^ cash 
handing expefienca and excelleni customer sefviceddis. 

Prior toiler experience is pmfeiTed. 

We offer a prcfessiona! and friendly worit environnnent ffi wbI 

as a competitive salaiy and benefits padcage. Compensation 

will tn tȣdd upon experience. No telephone calls please. 

Apply In person at: 

GREAT LAKES CREDIT UNION 

2525 GREEN BAY ROAD 

NORTH CHICAGO, JL 60064 

E.OJE!. 
SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT 



^A 



BueincBB 
Opportuniticfl 

SPACEBALL ENTER- 
TAINMENT RIdt Sweeping 
Country. CXvn this business for 
$19,900. Fuli-parl-lime. ALL 
CASH. Above average 
Opportunity for serious 
business seeker. Limited 
openings. (600)828-2536. 

22-00-00 
WOLFF TANNING BEDS 
Nsw commercial-Home units. 
From $199. Lamps-totiona* 
accessories. Monthly 
payments low as $18.00 Call 
today FREE new color catalog 
1-800-22S-6292. 



^ 



22-00-00 



Itudincbit 
jOpporlunhicB 

COMMITMENT 
TO SUCCESS ~ 

If you're determined to work 
hard and smart, so you get 
what you want out of life, 
SERVICEMASTER can show 
you how. With an Investment of 
$10,000 down you can Join 
over 4,000 professional 
cleaning business people who 
enioy SERVICEMASTER 
commitment to full support. 
There will never be a more 
opportune time nor will it cost 
less to join SERVICEMASTER 
than right now. Call (706)918- 
7S5S. 



Child Care 



31 



22-36-100 



Chlhl Care 



NEED BABYSITTER? 
LOVING mother will tend your 
children anyday, anytime 
$1.50 an hour, meals Included. 
Hive In WauKegan. Ask for 
Jackie. (706)263-7435 
24-TF-60/G 

^(D+@-s(D 

CHILD CARE HELP 
WANTED. Mature woman to 
care for my twin Infants In my 
Mundeieln home. Position to 
begin Oct. 19th. 4 days per 
week, 3 days 11 :30am to 
5:1 5pm, 1 day 7am to 5:15pm 
Babies have wonderful 
disposition and are elot of fun 
to care for. Call (706)566-7482 
to arrange Inten/lew. 
24-38-2 



m 



PART-TIME Chlldcara 
naedsd in your home or mine 
for 3 & 6 year old. Woodland 
School Dist., Grayslake. Call 
Debbie (708)548-1851. 
24-36-101 

HELP WANTED- 14 year 
old girl or older. 1 hour after 
school, Monday through 
Friday, to help with child care. 
(708)740-1372. 

24-36-123 

SITTER AVAILABLE. Will 

watch your child, full time only, 
In my McHenry honie. Toys, 
fenced In yard, meals Included, 
Know firal-aJd and CPR. For 
more Information call 
(815)344-7823 Ask for Kathy. 
24-TF-7 




NURSING DIRECTOR 



l=or 120 bed si^rkir rated SNF 

k)Cd h FkMida. We provkie the 

tilghect quaJky long term care 

urvlcee wHh ihe most advanced 

Bysteme In the area. iVe, tpedaliy 

beds & reetoratlve care. 

AdirinlBtratlvo A Medicare 

expefler>09pfeJafred. Excellent 

■alary & benefits. Bulk) & lead our 

Blabte & dedicated team. Contaa 

Petar l.owle, NHA. for more Inlo. 

813-465-7200. EOE 



tllllllKlllimilllllllltlHt 

IMMEDIATE 

Openings for 

CNA'S 

Afternoons, 
evenings and 

weekends. 

Contact 
Sister Arlene 
(708) 438-5050 

Mount St. 

Joseph's 

Lake Zurich 

llllllllllllllllillillllllilll 



We have open- 
ings for the fol- 
lowing positions: 

•OCCUPATIONAL 

THERAPIST 

and 

'SOCiAL WORKER 

to cfo consultant 

work in a small 

nursing home. 

For Interview 

HIGHLAND HOME 
Genoa City, Wl 

(414)279-3345 



R 



Cltild Care 



MOTHER OF 1 WILL CARE 

foryour child, 2 and up, full or 
part-time, 1st or 2nd shift. In 
my Round Lake Park home. 
Fenced yard, lots of toys and 
activities, lunch and snacks 
Included. Very Reasonable. 
References available. Call 
Roberta (708)546-2406. 

24-36-102 
MATURE. RESPONSIBLE 
babysitter needed for 2 
children, 3 afternoons a week 
from 2:30 to 4:30pm In our 
Wauconda homo. Must be 
reliable and have own 
transportation. Call (708)526- 
7024 tietore 2pm. 
24-36-167 




DJdlgiDJ .Ml 





m. 



cnn loD 




ico 



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im 



fl] 



Be 885,924 
places at once 
with an Illinois 
Statewide 
Classified Ad 

The Illinois Statewide 

Classified Ad network 

reaches 885,924 

households each week 

Coniact Your 

Classified Account 

Executive at 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whiuicy 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



"^^ RN'S/LPN*B 

New Hop* TiMtti»nt,Ctn*ir In 
ClwrtoBtoa SC arwl We wll bt oo 
Oprah Wiiiwf* Show Saptwitor 
3.^992 A SKfad S»»nt. a opectal 
hoctad by Oprah Wltif »y on S«(j« 4 
4 e . 1 Mi We provkte « uritoM 4 
challsnglna opportunity t w RNJ; 4 
|J>K-tTo utibe their cfMeal iklllB 

1n«i»sldentialuttiiwfor 

emottanily dWurtwd udofeecwtt. 

We otter exMlient ooiriiMiMtion -t- 

rflocatton g»«lBUnc8. Send reeume 

to 225 jUlMland nwy.. 

SurtiiTWV««.SCZ948S/ 

phoM 1-«)0-»S1-»10 



CNA 

The Terrace Nursing Home , 
Is looking for Cenllled' 
Nursing Assistants, all shifts. 
Apply In Person and please ' 
faring cetimcade. Abo 

Psych/Soc 
Assistant 

wartad.H.S. grad with soma 
college and the desire to 
work with older adults. 
Responsibilities Include ntn- 
nlng small discussion 
groups, working one on one 
with older adults, woiWng up 
assessments. Good commu- 
nk:ailon and writing skills a 
must. Apply In Pemon 

TERRACE 
NURSING HOME 

1615 SunMl, Wauksgan 



RN/LPN 

Openings left for 
Night Shift, part/full 
time and weekend 

position open for 

Rrj/LPN.If. 
interested, contact 

Sister Mary 

MOUNT 
ST. laSEPH 

(708) 438-5050 

Inactive or Retired 
Nurses Welcome 




Appliance 
Repair 



APPLIANCE REPAIR, work 
done on all makes, 
refrigerator, freezers, air 
conditioners, washers, dryers, 
dishwashers, ranges, ovens, 
and disposals. Ask for Rick 
(708)587-3339. 

81-36-44 



Blacktop 




HARRY STOKES 
BLACKTOP 

Seal Coating • Repair 
Free Estimates 

C70S) 249-6115 

Waukegan 



tiduculion/ 
Itifilruction' 



Sll 



Firewood 



^ ^ 



FIREWOOD UNUMITEO 
Season 2 years 

Free delivery & stacking 
Mixed hardwoords $60 F.C. 
Oak $65 

Cl»fly, Birth, Hickoiy $75 

Discount on 
2 or more 

Call anytime 

(708)888-0102 



^T.DIR.OFKUHS)NO 

RN wlh manaownint v*fm, prt- 
rd It wanted for a pfogr«Mi» 

position In Ftorida. W» are ■ 120 

tMd tuperbr rated faclHy otfaring 

ttxcall. tiena. 4 corrp. pay. 

Contact Pater IjBwte, NHA, to 

mom Into, al fll3-«S5-7200. EOE 



Immediate 
Opening for 

Dietary Aides 

Must have 

sanitation 

certificate. 

If interested 

contact: 

Sister Arlene 

(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT 

ST. JOSEPH'S 

Lake Zurich 

I ^=^ 



Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 



/ 



TUTORING- ANTIOCH 

Teacher with Masters Degree 
will tuior after school K ^ru 8 
graders. (815)363-1277. 
S-1 1-37-05 



DIRECT 



Full & part time 

positions open for 

Men & Women 

to work with 

autistic teenagers. 

AH Shifts 

available. Home 

located in the 

GurneeA/Vaukegan 
area. Must be 
21 -f, have good 
communication 
skills and valid 
driver's license. 
$5.53/hourwilh 

excellent benefits, 

We Provide 
Training 

Call: 

The Home 
Supervisor 

(708) 263-0097 

EOE 




Housekee^iig 



CLEANINQ. WILL CLEAN 
your house OR apartment 
Central Lake County areas 
pleitsti. References. 
Reasc<nabie (708)223-7401. 
CaJI Birb anytime. 

S-16-36/TF-1 




ProlcssSonaT 
Services 



EXPERIENCED, RELIABLE 

CLEANING LAOES will custom 
dean your home, weekly, or bi- 
weekly. Excellent references. 
Call (708)566-1426 or 
(708)566-2395. 
PERMANENT COSMETIC 
Forever beautiful eyelinlng 
electrolosla by Sherry 
(708)244-1640. 



Logo -ago go 



Advcriklng/Graphic Services 

For all types 

of 
Commercial 

Printing 
(708)223-8167 




MiBccUancou 



DRY UP YOUR WET 

BASEMENT with the Beaver 
Basement Water Control 
System. Proven In more than 
100,000 homes. Dependable. 
Affordable. For No obllgatjon 
eva!uatk}n call All Dri Company 
(708)263-9524. 

S49-36-Q5 
FIREPLACE MANTLES, 
Had* to order. Original 
designs. Samples. e'xB*. Oak, 
$155. Pine. $80. Call: Ron's 
Special Woods, (708)223- 
5087, After 5pm. 

S4ft-42-122 



30 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



NURSING 

ntwptr.pr*- 
pmgrauiw 

icDty oHafing 
orrp. pay. 
ito,NHA,tor 
t5-7200.EOE 



iiate 

gfor 

Aides 

lave 

tion 

ate. 

»sted 

ict: 

kflene 

3-5050 

NT 

EPH>S 

urich 



IE 

t time 
ipen for 
tomen 
with 
nagers. 
ifts 

Home 
in the 
lul^egan 
jst be 
3 good 
[cation 
i valid 
cense. 
ur with 
senefits. 

>vide 
ling 

II: 

lome 
visor 

13-0097 




VILL CLEAN 

}R apartment 
County areas 
taferences. 
'08)223-7401. 
e. 




I, RELIABLE 

ES will custom 
, weekly, or bi- 
nt references. 
M426 or 

COSMETIC 

Iful eyellning 
by Sherry 



|sgQ 

phlc Services 

types 

ercial 

ing 

3-8167 




rOUR WET 

Ih the Beaver 
ater Control 
1 tn more than 
t. Dependable. 
No obUgatlon 
JIDrl Company 

16-95 
MANTLES, 

ler. Original 
M. ffxe*. Oak, 
D. Call: Ron's 
Is, (706)223- 




kASCK? f C- 



AnliqucB 




i-ffi 



C'UNIQN GROVE, WISCONSIN') 



13.00 PcfPcM^ 
nEEPAIUNG 

SUNDAY, SEPT. 13 

MIDWESTS nNEST ANTIQUE DEALER SHOWCASE i! 

• QUAUTY MERCHANDISE GUARANTEED 

. NO NEW OR REPRODUCTION MERCHANDISE 

• INSIDE & OUTSIDE DEALERS 

• FOOD & REFRESHMENTS AVAIU^BLE 

Rte. 45 & Hghwy. 1 1 at the Racine County Fairgrounds 
Union Grove, Wisconsin 

1/2 hour south of Milwaiicde • One-hour north of Chicago 
• West of 1-94 on Highway 11 

or Information Call: (708) 540-775^ 



kNTIQUE SEWING 

lachlns, treadle. Oak, 6 
Irawer cabinet, works and 
excellent condition. With 
inachments $225. (708)223- 
1873. 



ElcclronicB/j 
Compuiera 



^R 



30-TF-95 



axaurti 



CruflH 



M 



KRAFTERS WANTED tor 

Established boutique In FOX 
\KE. Plaster Plus. 40 E. 
irand Ave. (70B)&e7-iigg. 
Jmtted space available. 
33-36-1 OJ 

^CHAPTERS WANTED: 



:-■■! 



RLA8 Fine Arts Boosters Arts 
and Craft Show, Saturday and 
Sunday. October 24 and 25. 
For application call: Phyllis 
Parsons (706)546-1332. 
Deadline is October 1,1992. 



33-37-1 S3 



Horace & 
Tack 



s 



COMPUTER- GREAT FOR 

STUDENTS. IBM Mtodel PS-1 
computer. Loaded with 
software, windows, word-star, 
micro software, etc. Includes 
printer. t1,29S or best offer 
(708)387-0553. 

36-36-100 

TIRED OF CABLEIII 
Umbrella Saiellite has the 
sotutton, a Galaxy-5 package, 
starting at $1,600. Call Paul at 
(708)587-5598. 

36-37-110 

COUPUTERS. IBH 

Compatible. Complete 
systems yirith hard drives, VGA, 
and monitors, loaded and 
ready to run from (450. Will 
build to suit arxj beat others 
prices. Call {70B)68&O030. 
36-37-9e/G 



,1 YEARLING PALOMINO 

FILLY, Will be good small 

hunter, $600. (708)949-1833. 

42-36-46 



[loracB & 
Tack 




i 

A 

•1 



1^ 


BALED 


SHAVINGS 


^m 


1 Bate or 1,000 -Cash & Carry 
Hay, Straw & Horse Feed 

HORTON BROS. 








^ Bristol, Wl 

(414) 887-282S 

Mon.-Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-3 



llousctioldg/i 
Furnilurc 



m 




BASSETT BABY CRlB- 

; Mattress and pads, like new 
condition $150. (708)336- 

■ 7753 

43-TF-16 . 

\ MOVING SALE- - FORT 
Sheridan. (4)w)ndow air 

I oonditlonefs, ISO to $200 or all 

[for $500. Pecan secretary 
desk with matching chair $95. 
(70e}e»-0134. 

43-3&-4G 
HAMMOND ORGAN, old 
but good condition, $100. 
(708)548-1832. 

43-38-49 
MATCHING 3pe. SOFA, 
toveseai arKi chair, 3 years okl, 
Neutral color. Excellent 
condition. Best offer. (706)973- 
0351. 

43-37-5 

GLASS/CHROME DINING 
room table and 4 beige 
upholstered chairs. Excellent 
condition. $1S0 (708)916- 
7653. 

43-37-104 

WATERBED, Soft-tld«d 

kingsize, 3 years old with 

sheets, $400. (706)356-1280. 

43-36-112 



HANDMADE 

TRESTLE 

TABLE 

With 2 benches 
Perfect for 

Kitchen nook or 
rec room! 

$850 

Please Call: 

(414) 694-5979 



llouBcholdB/ 
Furniture 



QUEEN EXTRA FIRM 

mattress and box springs. 
Name brand. Never used, 
(worth $550], Sell for $245. 
Will deliver. (312)856-9078. 

43-3>50 
FULL SIZE BABY crib and 
mattress, asking $80 like newi 
(708)367-4818. 

43-36-106 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE 

bedroom set, complete 
$1,100. Dining room set, 
$1,700 Cherry. All in perfect 
condition. (708)406-0166 Must 
Selll 

43-38-105 
(4)13lnch TIRES, 75% 
Rubber All Season thread, 
$75. Water softener $50. 
Trailer hitch $15. 32inch 
exterior door with frame and 
window. $50. (2Jwasher6 
(l)dfyer $50 each (708)740- 

0562. 

^-^.TF-fi/G 
WATERBED- BEAUTIFUL 
KING SIZE, all oak Denmark 
bed frame with 6 drawer 
pedestal, 4 light mirrored 
headboard with cabinets, dual 
heaters and heart pulse 
vibrators, padded side rails, 2 
full sets of sheets and 
comforters. $400 or best olfer. 
(708)546-7446. 

COMPLETE UVING ROOM 
SET, traditional couch, 
lovesdQt and chair. Solid wood 
construction, excellent 
cor>dltion plus matching coffee 
table, (2) end tables and (2) 
lamps, $1,000. (708)660- 
0291. 

43-36-49 
QUEEN SIZE SOFA bed; 
console 25Inch TV, Queen size 
Eotkl oak headboard/footboard 
set.. Must Sell, MOVING. 
(706)265-0530. 

Ai.sfi-in/rs 




JlquBeholdB/ 
Furniture 



CHERRYWOOD- 9-plec» 

dining set $1,950. Inlaid tile 
dinette set, $295 Queen brass 
head and footboard $190 
Queen bedding set $260. 
Never Used. (708)940-1646. 

43-36-12 

KINGSIZE WATERBED 

^ double podestal, excellent 

condition $550 negotiable 

(708)497-3051. 

43-TF*-3 



Lawii/ 
Garden 




JOHN DEERE 380B 

CRAWLER LGV\DER, four- one 
bucket, excellent under 
carriage, low hours, $7,600. 
(706)244-3467. 

44-37-51 

JOHN DEERE 400-RIDING 

lawn mower. 60* mower deck, 
20HP, good condition, $3,400. 
(815)943-7838. 




Lawn/ 
Garden 




18ft. ROUND ABOVE 

GROUND POOL, with new 
expandable liner and ladder. 
No one left at home to use it, 
$400. Day (708)367-6640, 
ask for Joyce. After 3:30pm, 
(708)546-4707. 

44-37-113 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 
Nordstrom "n-ee 

Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

708-526-0858 




Large Spring Nursery Stock 

AUCTION 

Saturday, September 5. 1992 

Lake Zurich. IL 
DAM FRITZ HURSERY 

24838 N. Old I^Henry Rd. 

(3 miles East of Rt. 12) 

Fresh dug Northern Trees, Shrubs & 

Evergreens. Potted/ B. & B. 

Ready to load. 

Full Catalog Sale Day. 

For more Information 

(708)438-5101 



Musical 
InfllrumcntB 



ORGAN, WURLITZER 
4300, excellent condition, 
$500. (414)877-3213. 

46-36-116 
PIANO, UPRIGHT, Qlaaa 
window to hammer and 
strings, rebuilt Will consider 
trade. $1,100 or best offer. 
(414)877-3252 or (414)877- 
9672 days. 

46-37-1 17 
D.J. SYSTEM- lurntiblss, 
and mixer, new $145 each. 
Power amp with SCO watts 
$295 each. Speaker cabinet 
with 500 watts, new, $345/pajr. 
(708)520-3155. 

46-36-15 
DRUM SET- Splacs and 
cymbals, and hardware. Worth 
$760 new $385 (706)520- 
3155 
46-36-1 6 

PetB & 

SupplicB 

ONLY 2 FEMALE 
Pomaranlin pups lehl AKC 
registered. Must selll Price 
negotiable, (708)668-3201 
(7am-4p) or (708)669-3034 
(after 4:30pm) 

47-36-1 1/G 





Pels & 
SuppLice 

LABRADOR RETRIEVER 

PUPPIES, yellow and black, 
mates and females, AKC, 
OTA, show or field, excellent 
bloodlines, 1st shots. 
(706)623-6393. 

47-36-55 
AKC REGISTERED, Black 
and Chocolate Lab Puppies. 
Pidi yours out today I Ready to 
go September S, Call tor 
information after 6pm 
(706)746-5825. 

47-36-56 
COCKER SPANIEL 
PUPPIES, buff, black, tri- 
cotored male and females, 
AKC. (414)742-3356. 

47-37-57 
CHOW PUPS, AKC, g 
waaka, blues, creams, and 
blacks, shots and wormed, 
$235 and up. (414)857-2279. 

47-36-60 
AKC GOLDEN 

RETRIEVER, (2) male 
puppies, 8 weeks, shols, 
dewdaws removed. (414)889' 
8328. 

47-?6-f1 
DOG RUN. Cyelona (anea, 
24fLlong x6ft.x6fL high. $200 
(708)726-1809. 

47-36-17 



Pets & 
Suppli 



es 




GREAT DANE, famala, aga 
3, Friandty. Free to good home 
onlyl Needs to be able to 

come Inside In odd weather. 
(708)973-0243 

47-36-156 
GREAT DANE PUPPIES- 
2 litters, top quality black, fawn 
and brindle AKC. Shots, 
wofmed. champion bloodlines. 
(414)248-2597 After Spm. Ask 
for Sandy. 

47-TF.83 
AKC REGISTERED 

COCKER Spaniel Puppies, 
born 6/23/92, buff, red, 
wormed, and shots. After 4pm 
(414)539-3516. 

47-36-57 
GOLDEN RETRIEVER 
PUPS, AKC regfstfifed. $225- 
$250. Papers. (414)657-9299. 

47-36-58 
PUPPIES. GERMAN 
SHORT-Haired, AKC, (2) 
males, (1) female. $250. 
(414)878-2908. 

47-36-59 



^A 



Mieccllancou 



BOAT STORAGE, Pra- 
aaason special, cars and 
boats, up to 18 feet, $139. 
Near Fox Lake. (815)678- 
4228 

45-37-52 
24H. HARBOR3IDE POOL, 
3/4 Jacuzzi sand filter, main 
drain, light, solar cover and 
reel, and ail accessories, paid 
$3,289, asking $1 ,000 or best 
offer. I6hp Simplicity Tractor, 
completely overhauled last 
year, asking $900 or best otter. 
Kingsize Waterbed, 8- drawer 
pedestal, heater, mirrored 
headboard with lights, velour 
rails, asking $400 or best offer. 
(708)497-9213. 

45-37-53 
•MARINE MUFFLERS* 
(2) pair Gil hi perf 4' clamp on 
silencers- new $T.215. must 
sell $650. (706)567-1688 and 
leave message. 

45-37-54 
NINTENDO LOVERSIl THE 
•Original- TETRIS game by 
Tengon, (banned from the 
market, now a Collectors hem) 
can be yours for $250.00 Still 
sealed In original package. Call 
(708)740-2789. Leave 
message. 

45-33/TF-OO 
STEAM PRESSURE 
WASHER, 1800 pounds, 
diesel, kerosene, $750. 
(708)356-1693. 

45-36-52 
BEAUTY SHOP Styling mat 
$70. also Interchangable letter 
sign $70 Call (708)746-4550. 

45-35-45 
ELECTRIC STOVE, $150. 
Lowrey organ, $150. Tandy 
1000 Computer, $400. 
(708)746-0329. 

45-36-127 
COMMERCIAL TANNING 
Bed, 30 lamp. Best offer 
(706)746-4550. 

_45.37-105 
TRUMPET $75. 2 Place 
couch, $20. Atari cartridge 
$1.00 each, 24inch Boys bike, 
$10. High chair. $5. (708)395- 
5923. 

45-36-13 
REBUILT ON AN RV 
Generators. Starting at $900. 
Installation available. 
(414)534-4781. 

45-37-14 
TROMBONE WITH CASE 
■ nd stand, (2) used self 
storing stormdoors (32x80 & 
35x80), Wrought iron 
chandelier and matching 
sconces, Lomart 3/4hp pool 
pump/tiitar (like new) Taking 
best offers on all. (708)223- 
6071 after 4pm. 

45-37-8 

UNUSUAL WALL 

HANGING, cast molded 
floral, 3 dimensional piece, 
3'x4". must see to appreciate. 
$125. (815)385-4868. 

45-36-53 
WANTED: GAS MODEL 
AIRPLANE engines, Irom 40's, 
50'3, and 60'a. Also, gas 
powered race cars. (706)824- 
3130. 

45-36-54 
SELL FULLER BRUSH, 
PART Time for FULL time 
Income. Independent 

distributor. 1 (800)927-931 9. 

45-38-55 



"^^m 



Miscellancou 



WINTER PROJECT- Saioh 

eSOG Tractor, bad engine, 
$850. Ford 2110 diesel, bad 
engine. $1,650. Davis T-78 
Track Trencher, bad engine, 
$350. 1979 Ford F700 (3)car 
hauler, bad engine, $3,500. 
(706)438-7437. 

45-38-114 




Medical Equlp^^ 
.Supplies 



45A 



HOSPITAL BED FOR 
SALE, In good condition, 
$450. Ask for Gary (708)362- 
37S3. 

45A-37-J1 5 

Musical 
InslrumcnU 




I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAY! 

The Assist 

Animal 
Foundation 

ONE CAN 

MAKE A 

DIFFEREKCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL 

MAKEAMIRICLE. 

GIFTS ARE 

TAX DEDUCTIBLE. 

NOT FOR 

PROFIT... 

VOLUNTEER 



We don't destroy homeless 
animals! They live their lull lives 
uncaged 11 not adopted. We spay 
and neuter, conduct a dynamic pel 
visitation/lherapy program for the 
elderly, provide education 
programs for young people and 
offer a special "pet retirement" 
program. THANK YOU FOR 
YOURHELPI 




BAND INSTRUMENTS- 

Trumpet with case. Rich tones. 
New! $135. Flute with case, 
new. $145. (708)459-3244. 

46-37-10 
BASS GUITAR. Fandsr 
precision Baas copy, new 
$135. Bass amp, new $95. 
(708)520-3155. 

46-37-9 



j"Name 
I Address. 
rCity, St_ 
I Zip Code, 



-1 



'individual Membership $15 

iFamily Membership $20 Donation $ 

I 

I 



Please mail to: Assisi Animal Foundation 



I 

J».O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815) 455-9411 ' 



PETS IN NEED 
Needs YourHelpI 

Here is a sample of 

a few of the animals 

we have available 

for adoption: 

Long and short hair 

kittens, also cats. 

Persian declawed, 

Himalayan, Basset. 

doberman, malamute, 

Kiesch-hound, 

chocolate lab. 

springer mix. 

Spay Neuter 

Program Available 

Please call for more 

information 

(815)PAT-1462 

Pets In Need 



TooU & 
Machinery 

16 DRAWER SNAP-ON 
Tool Box, like new, $1,500 
value, $600 or best offer. 
Snap-On timing liQhl, $100 or 
beat oHer. (708)395-3864 
After 6pm. 

48-37-118 
PRESSURE WASHER, 
1,600 pounds, diesel, 
kerosene, $600. (708)356- 
1693. 

46-37-119 




I 

I GUIDESALE 



ZONE 1 



ANTIQUES AND 

COLLECTABLES SALE, 

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 
9am-? 36426 North Wilson 
Road. (59 and Wilson), 
Ingteslde. Many wonderful 

hantiques and collectables. 

^'Cleaning out for Winter, From 
furniture to Happy Meals. 
LErS MAKE A DEAL 

,WEEKENDI 1951 Ford stakes 
bed truck(prelty yellow), 

, outboard motors, large wine 
press, yard fumiture, cast Iron 

.gatore, toys, glassware. YOU 

'NAME rr. BRING something 
antique to trade or sell. 36426 
North Wilson Road, Ingleside. 
(708)587-5848. 

40-36-111 

: 7-FAMILY YARD SALE- 

l Aug. 29 and 30. 9am to 5pm. 

! Old Shorewood Subdivision on 

Lake Park Ave., Hound Lake, 

RAN DATE SEPT. 5 & 6. 

40-36-8*1 



ZONE 3 



I 




SALE- SAT. 



'tTjV'.^' SUN from 9 to 4pm. 46 Mark 
[i Dr. Hawthorn Woods, off 
|.' Lah Gilmer or Old McHenry Rds, to 



I 
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Darlington, James, to Mark. 
40-36-94 '3 



■-r - i ; ■ i.'«\ • 



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I 

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I 
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I 
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^^ 






i 



P 




Wtinicdi 
To Buy 

WANTED: HARKER, 

HALL, Universal Poneries, 
o[c„ Wichen and serving ware. 
Older dinnenMare, glassware, 
1900'8-ig50's and Norltake 
China. Other coltectabtes 
considered. (1) ilemcKmany. 
Nancy (708)356-0331 or Nan 
(708)356-7479. 

49-36-120 
FLEA UARKET DEALER 
Wants to buy tods, old books, 
dishes, knick-knacks, lamps, 
sports related items, toys, 
glassware, furniture, etc. Call 
Bob at (70e)356-88e7, 
evenings. Please do not call 
after you've had sale, SAVE 
THIS AD. 

49-37-58 
ANTIQUES AND 

COLLECTIBLES, Almost 
evefylhing and anythingi Old 
toys, banks, trains, doils- 
Barbie to Bisque, battery 
operated toys, old cowboy 
toys. Roy Rogers, etc.: pedal 
cars, old motor bikes and 
bkyde, folk art, ship models, 
wood Inboard boats, antique 
outboard motors, anything 
nautical, furniture. Mission 
Oak, wicker, glassware, oil 
paintings, crocks, pottery, 
stained glass lamps and 
windows. You nan>e ill WE 
ALSO CONDUCT HOUSE 
SALES, AUCTION SERVICE 
ALSO AVAILABLE. (708)587- 
5648, or bring It over, 36426 
North WIson Road, Ingleshje. 

49-39-121 
WANTED: PIANOS. 
Upright In good condition. 
Reasonable. Call (708)473- 
3107, 

49-37-12/G 
SLOT MACHINES: 

WANTED to buy, any 
condition or parts. Also 
Wuriltzser Jukeboxes and 
Nickelodeons. Paying cash 
(708)985-2742. 

49-TF/39-13/G 




Homes 
For Sale 



MEYERS/ PISTAKEE BAY 
AREA. Waterfront. By 
owner/builder on Chain of 
Lakes. Bring your boat to this 
lovely New construction 3 
bedroom, 2-1/2 bath, walk out 
basement, pier, hardwood 
floors throughout, 2 stone 
fireplaces, cedar shake roof, 
REDUCED TO $259,900. 
OPEN HOUSE Sundays 1- 
4PM CALL for directions 
(615)344-3321. Owner will 
consider ALL offers. 
50-TF/35-114 



Homes 

For Sale 




llomcB 
For Sale 




Homes 
For Sale 



BY OWNER. OVERSIZED 

tri-levei on Channel. 4 
bedroom, large family room, 
eat-in country kitchen, all 
appliances, firoplace, walk out 
basement, near schools. 
Asking $99,500 (708)740- 
3035. Round Lake Bead;. 

50-37-4fi 
JOHNSBURG LAKE 

DAWNWOOD, 3 bedroom. 2 
1/2 baths, 3 car garage. Nice, 
high omer lot, call for details, 
(815)385-9354 or (815)675- 
2944. 

50-36-130 



SPECIAL 3 bedroom, 3 
bath tri-leve), targe family 
room with masonary lireplace, 
privacy fenced yard, 2-1/2 car 
garage. REDUCED to 
$154,900. LINDENHURST by 
Owner. (708)356-2618. 

50-37-21 
SPECIAL 3 bedroom, 3 
bath trJ-ievel, large family 
room with masonary fireplace, 
privacy fenced yard, 2-1/2 car 
garage. REDUCED to 
$154,900. LINDENHURST by 
Owner. (708)356-2618. 

51-36-21 




Homes 

For Sale 




BY OWNER/BUILDER. 
HlltsId* Ranch, lakeview of 
Cross Lake, Antioch, 3 
bedroom, 3 bath, Ttreplace, 
■One of a kind" $189,900 
r70e)395-0l05. 
QURNEE. BEAUTIFUL 3 
bedroom. 3 balh, Colonial on 
large prh/aie lot, full basement, 
fireplace, cathedral ceilings, 
custom draperies, neutral 
decor, oak cabinets, central 
air, central vacuum, ceramic 
tile and more. (708)263-8206. 
50-36-132 



KHCHEi\S 

That 

REALir 

Cook! 



<i 




GAS 

HOMES 

FREE APPUA9^€ES 

In Tour IKEW Wausau Hame... 

If you order a new home before October 30, 1992, you 
can get a new GE range, refrigerator, and dishwasher 
absolutely free... 

All our homes are constructed 
using these Brand Names. 



Homes On Your 
Lot Starting At 

g55,900 

SCHLAGE si mou 

©THOM/\S m 

.Armstrong 



q ouRWE D" 



UNITED STATES QYPSUM 




LINDENHURST RANCH- 3 

bedroom with family room 
addition. Great schools, LOW 
Taxes. $114,900 (708)356- 
3328 /Owner. 

50-36-20/G 
ALGONQUIN LOG HOME- 
Wooded hillside, secluded, 3 
bedroom, 2 baths, loft, 
cathedral ceiling in Great 
Room, wood stove, wrap 
around deck, large master 
bedroom with deck, $169,900. 
(708)658-8575. 

50-35-62 
UNIQUE McHENRY RIVER 
FRONT HOME, near town. 
Fish and boat from own pier, 
with steel sea wail. Brick 
home, boasts 3/4 bedrooms, 2 
baths, Large living room with 
18ft. stone fireplace. Newly 
carpeted throughout. Gas hot 
water heat. Potential 4200 
square feet of luxury. Healed 

2 car brick garage with own 
bath. Owner asking $197,900, 
but flexible. Adjacent river 
front home also available. 
(815)344-1623. 

50-36-131 
BY OWNER- QRAYSLAKE. 

3 bedroom Ranch with large 
Master bedroom and walk In 
closet, on quiet street. 
Completely remodeled the last 
3 yeait) with new kitchen, bath, 
deck, finished basement, 
electrical and carpet 
throughout. 1128,000 Call tor 

' appointment (706)223-1393. 
50-37-15 




•'''^ 



A ^ 



' ( 



CBIDUNTQI 

Monshetd* MIM^^ 



COUNTY LINE 



216 Janet Drive 

Island Lake 

708-526-830B 



TRIPLE "A 



II ^M 



34390 N. Rte. 45 

Lake Villa 

708-223-7900 



BY OWNER- 4 bedroom 

wnch on 1 acre, 2 miles north 
of Antioch In Rock Lake. Rec 
room with bar and pool table, 2 
baths, mud room, central air, 
2-1/2 car garage, summer 
room, shop and barn. 
$135,000. 2 more acres also 
available. (414)862-2177 or 
(414)539-2150. 

50-38-21 
WAUKEGAN BEAUTIFUL 
GARDEN HOME. 2+ bed- 
rooms. Immaculate, welf 
maintained, set In excellent, 
quiet location. Beautifully 
finished basement wllh cedar 
paneling and newer carpeting, 
nicely decorated and 
landscaped. Anached garage. 
Stove with microwave. Asking 
$78,900. (708)244-5064. 

50-36-129 



Natasha's Stars 



ARIES (Marcli 21-April 19) You're 
on a continued high from last week 
thanks to your problem-solving 
abilities. However, don't let that op- 
timism blind you to yet another prob- 
lem lurking at work. The weekend 
looks good for relaxation and leisure. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your 
decision to be more gregarious will pay 
off this week, and you'll find yourself 
in the spotlight, this spills over into 
your social life as well. Don't be 
surprised when someoncwho had been 
avoiding you offers a hand in 
fricndsliip. 

GEMINI (May 2 1 -June 20) Much to 
your dismay, you'll find yourself 
embroiled in an unpleasant confronta- 
tion on the job front. Be careful when 
choosing sides as you must weigh 
everything carefully. This may be a 
good time for you to go over some 
travel literature and plan a much- 
needed trip. 

CANCER (June 21 -July 22) You 
may have some trouble tlus week shak- 
ing off a pesty admirer who just refuses 
to stop following you around. Take a 
firm stand on this. You'll find that this 
person is more needy than you can take 
right now. Rest up this weekend. 

LEO (July 23-August 22) Now that 
the bulk of your decision-making at 
work is out of the way, you can set your 
sights on some recreation time. Talk 
over possible travel plans with loved 
ones. Tlieir insights and feedback will 
prove very helpful and pleasurable in 
the long run. 

VIRGO (August 23-Scptembcr 22) 
Tills is a good week for you to take a 
much-needed breather from the hustle 
and bustle of past weeks. Don't be 
afraid to be totally self-indulgent. 
However, do beware of credit card 
risks. If you must buy, pay cash and use 
discretion. 



LIBRA (September 23-October 22) 
Your energy will be on the wane this 
week, so do be sure to retire early. If 
you don't, you'll find yourself falling 
down on the job, much to the irritation 
of higher-ups. While you can normally 
do several things at one time, this isn't 
the week to attempt it. 

SCORPIO (October 23-Novcmbcr 
21) It's time for a reality check. All the 
recent celebrating has you too apt to 
daydream, which doesn't bode well for 
tlic tasks at hand. It's roU-up-your- 
slccvcs lime. Get to it, and you'll be 
ready for a pleasant weekend break. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22- 
Decembcr 21) A loved one continues 
to be supportive and willing to com- 
promise. Take advantage of this to 
foster better communications. You'll 
find yourselves renewing your bond 
and enjoying each other more. The 
weekend looks good for a romantic 
getaway, 

CAPRICORN (December 22- 
January 19) Your tendency toward in- 
trospection isn't a good thing to 
indulge this week. Others look to you 
for decisions, and you must be ready to 
make them. However, stop and smell 
the roses this weekend. You deserve 
the break. 

AQUARIUS (January 20-Fcbruary 
18) Ever the social animal, you'll find 
yourself paying the price this week, 
both in lost energy and lack of focus. 
Get some more rest at night so you'll 
be able to deal with the important mat- 
ters at hand. Turn down invitations. 

PISCES (February 19-March 20) 
While you usually want things done 
NOW, It would be better to relax a bit 
and just enjoy some peace and quiet. 
You've been working much too hard, 
and you need some time off. This is a 
good time to take it. 

©1^2 by King Features Synd. 



What's New 
On the Market 



BY OWNER 

804 Warrtor, 
Round Lake His. 

Completely remodeled 3 bed' 

room home wilh 2 + car 

garage, deep quiet lot luliy 

fenced In yard w/comenl 

patio. All new kitchen, bath, 

and carpeting, Immaculate 

home in "move-in" condilion. 

For viewing please call 

708-662-0123 anytime. 



REDUCED 

Spring Grove/l/2 acre 
Large raised ranch In super 

area. Attached 2,5 car 

garage. The 8 rooms prowda 

space for the entire family. 

Above ground pool 

and equipment. 

Now $132,900 #148 

Century 21 Leech 

Zion Office 
(708) 872-4996 



Price Reduced 

397 NotifialB Rd, Underhurst. This 

soSd ranch with oatin kitchen & 

applanoes has finished basement 

vwih targe lamil/ room and 4lh 

bedroom, 2 lull belha, central aJr, 

newer cajpet. new red and 

tumaoe, taigid 'fiii. garage, and 

ANTIOCH SCHOOLS. For 

appdntmenlcal: 

(70fl)35&3208 



NEW ANTIOCH 
TOWNHOUSE 

2 bedroom home with 

dining room and 2 baths. 

Central air, basement. 

Priced to sell at 

$102,500 #157 

CENTURY 21 LEECH 

ZION OFFICE 

(708) 872-4996 



GOVERNMENT 
OWNED 
HOMES 

Some with low down 

payments. Kfinois and 

Wisconsin, Call Ann Tyra 

CENTURY 21 KNOX 
(708)872-2132 



REDUCED TO SELL 

MUST SEE! $129,900 

Willowridge sub, 2 yrs new, 
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bam, 2-3tory, 

family room with oak trim 
fireplace, (uli basement, oak 
cabinets & trim throughout on 
oulet cul-de-sac on large pro- 
fessionally landscaped over- 
sized lot. Many more 

upgrades. 

Call for appointment 

{708)740-1960 

BY OWNER 



I BUY 

MORTGAGES 

FOR CASH 

COMMERCIAL & 

RESIDENTIAL 

If you are receiving 

payments on a 

mortgage and 

would rather liave 

casti now, 

Call 

Great Lakes 

Investment Service 

(708) 587-0940 or 

1 •800-428-9333 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE SS. 
.COUNTY OF LAKE 
IN RE: THE PETITION OF 
UNDA PARFREY AND PHIUP PARFREY 
FOR ANNEXATION AND ENTRY INTO A 
PRE-ANNEXATION AGREEMENT WITH THE 
VILUGE OF FOX LAKE. LAKE COUNTY, ILUNCHS 
NftTlfiP "P PUHLIC MPARING QN 

ANNEXATION AND 

gNTnV INTO PRt=.AMNEXATION AGREEMENT 

On September 21 , 1992 at 6:30 p.m. a public heanng 
will be held before the combined Zoning Board of 
Appeals/Plan Commission and the Village President and 
Board of Trustees of the Village of Fox Lake in the 
Village Hall, 301 South Highway 59, Fox Lake. Illinois, 
for the purpose of considering and hearing testimony as 
to an Ordinance authorizing the execution of a Pre- 
annexation Agreement in regard to the Annexation to 
the Village of Fox Lake of a tract of land composed of 
approximately 32 acres, more or less. Parcel is located 
directly East of Wilmot Road and South of the South 
Boundary of Sundial Fami Subdivision and extends to 
the intersection of Main Street (formeriy Spring Lake 
Road) , with the exception of the separate parcels 
kx^ted immediately at tiie intersection of Wilmot Road 
and Main Street in Burton Towrwhip. McHenry County. 
Illinois. 

Said Parcel la tagally deacrlbad «•: 
PARCEL 1 

Of That part of the West halt of the northwest quarter 
of Section 29, Township 46 North, Range 9, East of the 
Ttiird Principal Meridian. Described as follows : 
Beginning In the Center of the Highway on the North line 
of Section 29, at a point 942.4 Feet East from the 
Northwest comer Iherool: Thence Southwesterly in the 
Center of sakl Highway, Being on a line forming an angle 
of 108 degrees to the Right, with a protongation of the 
last described line a distance of 30 feet to a point., 
Thance Westerly on a line forming an angle of 104 
Degrees, 23 Minutes to the left with a prokingation of 
the last described line for a distence of 143 Feet to a 
point Thence Southeriy on a line forming an angle of 
96 Degrees, 18 Minutes to the Right, with a prolongatksn 
of the last described line a distance of 341 .6 Feet to a 
point; Thence Westerly being on a line forming an angle 
of 89 Degrees, 32 minutes to the right, with a 
prolongation of the last desaibed line a distance of 169 
feet to a point in the center of the aforesaid Highway; 
Thence SiiMithwesterly along Ihe center of said Highway 
being on a line forming an Angle of 81 Degrees, 27 
minutes to the left, with a prolongation of the last 
described line a distance of 105,4 Feet.; thence 
Southwesterly along the Center of said Highway Being 
on a line forming an angle of 2 Degreos, 04 Minutes to 
the Right, with a pfok)ngation of the East described llrw. 
A distance of 772.46 Feet to a Point; thence Easterly at 
Right Angles to the Last described line a distence of 
330.87 Feet to a point; Thence Southeriy at Right 
angles to the last described line a distence of 792.19 
Feet to a point; thence Easterly on a tine fonming an 
angle of 90 Degrees, 07 Minutes to the Left, with a 
prolongation of the last described line a distance of 38 
feet to a Point; thenoe Southerly on a line forming an 
angle of 91 Degrees, 48 Minutes to the Right, with a 
prokingation of the last described line for a distence of 
235.4 Feet to the Center of the Old Highway; Thence 
Southeasterly along the center of the Old Highway, 
Being on a Une forming an Angle of 79 Degrees, 40 
Minutes to the Left, with a Prokingation of the Last 
described line a Distance of 255.06 Feet to an 
intersectbn with the center line of the present Highway 
(Known Stete Aid Route Section 13), thence Easteriy 
along the Center of the Last mentioned Highway, Being 
a curved line to the left (Radius 1910.08 Feet) for a 
distance of 649.3 Feet to an Intersectkin with the east 
line of the west half of the Northwest Quarter of SakJ 
section 29, Thence north on the last described line 
2613.1 feet to the north line of said section, thence 
west on said section line 381.9 Feet to the place of 
beginnlng.(Excepting therefrom that part of the West 
Half of Said Northwest Quarter of section 29, Described 
as Follows: Beginning at the point of intersection of the 
East line of the West Half of said Northwest Quarter with 
the Center line of a Public Highway running In a 
Southeasterly and Northwesterly Direction and 
commonly known as Spring Lake Road. Thence North 
on the East of the West Half of said Northwest quarter 
far a Distence of 552.62 Feet to a point; Thence west at 
right angles to tiie last described line at last described 
Point for a Distance of 250 Feel to a point; thence South 
parallel to the East line of the West half of said 
Northwest quarter for a distence of 487.17 feel to a 
point of the center line of said Highway; thence 
southeasterly on sakJ center line and being on a curve, 
convex southwesterly and having a Radius of 1910.08 
feet for a distence of 258.43 Feet. Chord measurement 
to the place of beginning), in McHenry County, Illinois. 
The common addreat la: 912 Main Street, 
Spring Grove, IL 60081 

A map of the subject property proposed to be 
annexed to the Village of Fox Lake and the fonn of the 
proposed Pre-Annexation Agreement ate on file with the 
Vtftage Clerk. 

Copies of proposed petitions for annexation, 
annexation agreement, zoning and subdivision platting 
as Single Family Residential are on file with the Village 
Clerk at the Fox Lake Village Hall. 

You are further notified tiiat said purposed Pre- 
Annexation Agreement may be changed, altered, 
■ modified, amended or re-<lratted in ite entirety. 

All Interested parties are invited to attend the PuWkj 
hearing and will be given an opportunity to be heard. 

Susan J. McNally 
Village Clerk 

DONALD C, STINESPRING '"""«'' °' "■" '^' "«"" 

Attorney for tiie Applicants 

Linda Parfrey and Philip Parfrey 

DONALD C. STINESPRING & ASSOCIATES 

10604 h4ain Street, P.O. 60X382 

Richmond, Illinois 60071 

(815) 678-4553 

0992A-028-FL 
September 4, 1992 



32 Lak*kind N«ws|9qp»n 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



I 

EHENI 

hearing 
oard of 
jentand 
i in the 

Illinois, 
mony as 

a Pre- 
(atlon to 
posed of 
3 located 
le South 
tends to 
ng Lake 

parcels 
lot Road 

County, 



,t quarter 

ast of the 

0II0W8 : 

North line 

from the 

trly in the 

I an angle 

on of tf>e 

a point., 

e of 104 

igation of 

Feet to a 

n angle of 

elongation 

Feet to a 

} an angle 

:, with a 

ice of 169 

Highway; 

i Highway 

grees. 27 

>f the last 

:.; thence 

way Being 

Minutes to 

a-ibed line. 

Easterty at 

listance of 

f at Right 

of 792.19 

orming an 

eft, with a 

anceof 38 

brming an 

ght, with a 

distance of 

ly; Thence 

Highway, 

egrees, 40 

if the Last 

et to an 

-It Highway 

a Easteriy 

way, Being 

Feet) for a 

th the east 

ler of Said 

cfit)ed line 

on, thence 

ie placa of 

if the West 

I, De6crit>ed 

iction of the 

Quarter with 

nning in a 

ction and 

lence North 

^est quarter 

mcewestat 

t described 

lence South 

alf of said: 

17 feet to a 

3y; thence 

on a curve, 

of 1910.08 

easurement 

ity, Illinois. 

ain Street, 

3sed to be 

form of the 

r\ file with (he 

annexation, 
sion platting 
1 the Village 

rposed Fre- 
ed, altered, 
»ty. 

kI the Public 
te heard, 
in J. h^Nally 
Village Clerk 
Lake, Illinois 




jIJfomcB 

;f For Sale 



RENTING 77 
WHY NOT BUY II 

luilder will help you get 

Pindng on New Homes now 
ng started. All have many 
Xupgrades. McHENRY- Bi- 

'^^'' "P^'' 'l"'^^^> Or^at 

c^tarter home, $89,000. 

'irlWONDER LAKE 2 bedroom 

(l^fWich, full basement $89,900. 

iiCRYSTAL LAKE or 

IPRINQ GROVE apadoue 

•story, 2 bedroom, 2-1/2 

^baths, full basement $123,000 

TH c H E N R Y and T W I N 

§AKES, Wise. 3 bedroom, 2 
ath, 2 car oarage, $125,000 
WRYSTAL LAKE 4-bedroom, 
■;,^2-l/2 bath, 3 car garage, on 
;^,MMI acre. $224,900 OR WILL 
FfiUiLD TO SUIT! Call for 
tdetails. (7081526-8306. 

isBi^ouRsrousE! 

' on Shis beautiful 2 bedroom, 
1 1 bath Ranch. A big fenced I 
I yard and mature Oak trees [ 
I add to the parit-like setting. 
Atfordably priced at only 
$79,000. 

Michael Lesdier 
•your link to thtehMln" 

708-395-3(X)0 

; RE/MAX advantage; 



llomes 
For Sale 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 

NEWER Raised ranch. 3 
bedroom, large KItdien, with 
oak cabinets, central air, 2 car 
garage, large deck and lanced 
In yard, on oversized lot. 
$104,000 (708)740-9514 

50-36-16 
3 BEDROOM HOME, 2 car 
garage, on 2 lots. Just off 
highway 50. About thirty 
minutes to Fox Lake train 
station, less time to Wilmot ski 
hills and Lake Geneva. 
$59,900. For further 
Information, call (414)862- 
6666. 

50-36-134 
GURNEE BY OWNER. 
4019 Oarlene Drive. 4 
bedroom, 2 1/2 baths, central 
air, sun porch, deck. 2 
fireplaces, large wooded lot, 
excellent schools and location, 
$225,000. (708)244-3660. 

50-36-135 








llomes 
For Safe 



GOVERNMIENT HOMES 

from $1 (U repair). 

Delinquent'tax property. 

Repossessions. Your 

area (1) 805 962-8000 

Ext. GH-3908 forcun-ent 

repo list. 






H 

'h 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COfVlMISSlGNER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 23753 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR QMl ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on May 15, 1992. 

I, Thomas Geraghty, Special commissioner for this court will 
on September 30, 1992 at the hour ol 1:30 p.m. at the front 
door of the Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Hlinois. sell to the highest bidder for cash, the 
foltowing described premises: 

2608 Gitboa Ave., Zion, 1 60099 

The Improvements on the property consists of a single family. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 

hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 

general taxes and 10 special assessments. 

The property will NOT Iw open for Inspection. 

The judgment amount was $62,929.76 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
speciHed date unless the property is redeemed according to law, 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiirs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law. the Sates Officer Is qqi required to provide additional 
Information other than that set forth in this notice. 



i 

.4 



I? 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COIulMISSIONERS SALE 

QUR FILE NQ, 23647 

(fT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 

THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered in the above entitled cause on April 22, 1992. 

I, Michael- Polelle. Special commissioner tor this court will 
on September 21, 1992 at the hour of 1:00 p.m. al the front 
door of Lake County Courthouse,. 18 N. County Street 
Waukegan Illinois, sett to the highest bidder for cash, the 
following described premises: 

2410 Elim Ave., Zion, IL 60099. 
The Improvements on the property consists of a duplex, 
wood frame, one story without a garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified lunds, balance within 
24 hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be 
subject to general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgment amount was $71 ,843.91 . 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certiricate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on 
a specified dale unless the property Is redeemed according 10 
law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintifrs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law, the Sales Officer Is rfii required to provide additional 
Information other than that set forth in this notice. 






992A-028-FL 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMIvllSSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO, 23497 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR OyVN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDtNG AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on May 7, 1992. 

I. Michael Polelle, Special commissioner for this court will 
on October 5, 1992 at the hour of 1:00 p.m. at the front door of 
the Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street. Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following 
desaibed premises: 

77 Lincolnshire Dr., Lincolnshire, IL 60015 
The improvements on the property consists of a single 
family, brick consinjctGd, one story with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The Judgment amount was $274.091 .37. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specilied date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 
For information call the Sales Officer at PiaintifPs Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1 :00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law, the Sales Officer Is qqI required to provide additional 
I information other than that set forth in this notice. 



McHENRY, RAISED 
RANCH, 2300sq.fl., 5 
bedroom, 2 bath, possible in- 
law, move In condition, Must 
Belli $119,900, (815)344- 
1364. 

JOHN3BURG RANCH. 2 
bedroom, fireplace, full 
basement, 2 car garage, large 
deck and appliances. $97,000 
(815)344-0768. 

50-35-59 
CRYSTAL LAKE/ 

COVENTRY. Newly 
remodeled 3 bedroom ranch. 
New rools, furnace, carpet, 
oven and custom window 
ireatmonts, REDUCED to 
$108,900. 1-815)455-7185. 

50-35-60 
BUILD YOUR OWN HOME. 
Miles provides materials with 
no down payment and below 
market construction finandng. 
Do-it-Yourseli aixi savell Miles 
Homes (800)343-2884. 

IJUSTREDUCEDI 

2 bedroom end unit in 

Diamond Hartxx. Boat 

jdock, pod, full t)asement,i 

attached garage, 

stone fireplace. 

All ttiis for only 

$119,900. 

Michael Ltttcher 

*Your link to th9 chain* 

708-395-3000 

iRBMAX ADVANTAGE i 




WATERFRONT 

Completely 
remodeled home on 

water to Chain 

O'Lakes. Garage and 

large trees. 

Only $92,000 

INVESTORS 

3 rental units on in 

town lot and 2 extra 

lots. 

$120,000 

CHAMOlAKESREALn 

(708) 587-8233 



Homes 
For Sale 

WHY RENT WHEN YOU 

CAN OWN your own 
Townhoma for IOC's or lesst 
Assumable FHA. (3) bedroom 
with balcony off master, 1 1/2 
baths, gorgeous stone 
fireplace, ceding fan, central 
air. All appliances Including 
wmher arMl dryer. End unit 
with attached 1 car garage. 
Close to swimming pool and 
tennis court Very dean Great 
Buy at $65,500. (708)546- 
0421. 

50^7-59 
BY OWNER- 3 BEDROOM 
RANCH, large Fenced in yard, 
aluminum sided with newer 
carpet, 1 1/2 bath, 1 1/2 
attached garage, low taxes, 
located In Grandwood Park, 
Woodland Schools. Asking 
$105,000. Call after 5pm 
(708)356-9319, Principles 
onlyl 

50-38-133 

BY OWNER- GRAYSLAKE. 

3 bedroom Ranch with large 
Master bedroom and walk in 
closet, on quiet street. 
Completely remodeled the last 
3 years with new kitchen, bath, 
deck, finished basement, 
electrical and carpet 
throughout. $128,000 Call for 
appointment (708)223-1393. 
50-36-32 

ATTENTION RENTERS! 
FOR SALE by owner. Don't 
pass up this opportunity to 
OWN Instead of RENT. 
•1- FOX LAKE house, 22 Elm 
St., low $80'a. 3 bedroom, 1 
bath, living room, large 
kltcf^n, large lot, completely 
rerrtodeied. 

« 
#2- ROUND LAKE BEACH 
townhome, 2013 Westvlow 
Ln., Asking low $90's. 3- 
bedroom, 2 bath, living room 
with family room, dining room, 
kitchen, family room, 2 car 
garage. Newer Complex. 

• 
LOW OOVm PAYMENTS. 
Will pay ck>slt>g costs to assist 
with purchase. Immediate 
possession. Make offers while. 
theylaatL 

i 

No brokers please. Interior 

Fashions Contract. Leave 

message (706)546-0817. 

50-37-101 



llomca 

For .Sale 




NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 23747 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on April 30, 1992. 

I, Alan Mills, Special commissioner for this court will 
on September 30, 1992 at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the Iront 
door of the Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the 
lollowing described premises: 

141 Holdridge Ave., Winthrop Harbor, IL 60096 

The improvements on the property consists of a single 
family, two story with a separate garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 
24 hours, certified funds. No relunds, The sale shall be subject 
to general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 

The Judgment amount was $80,928.55. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law, 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintilfs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1 :00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.. however under Illinois 
law, the Sales Ollicer is qqi required to provide additional 
information other than that set forth In this notice. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 23743 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR Qm. ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on May 1, 1992. 

I, Thomas Geraghty, Spedat commissioner for this court will 
on September 30, 1992 at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the from 
door of the Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the 
following described premises: 

25292 W. Scott Rd., Barrington, IL 60010 
The Improvements on the properly consists of a single 
family, brick construction one and a hall stories with the attached 
garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified lunds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open lor inspection, 

The Judgment amount was $438,290.07. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sate which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specilied date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Olficer at Plaintiirs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 Irom 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law. the Sales Ollicer is nsH required to provide additional 
Inlormation other than that set forth in this notice, 



NEW CONSTRUCTION, 

Sbedroom tri-level, finished 
lower level. Pick your own 
colors of carpeting, aiding, 
caUnets, etc. ^,900 Indudea 
lot. Futura Builders Inc. 
(706)546-2060. 

50*41 -21 
3-BEOROOM TOWN- 
HOME, Round Lake Beach, 
1-1/2 bath, 2-1/2 car garage, 
fenced yard, deck. $86,900 
(708)740-1 873/owner. 

50-37-157 
ALL OFFERS CONSID- 
EREDt REDUCED TO 
$259,000. Come see what 
Mi 3 bedroom fwme can offer 
you on the waterfront New 
construction, by owner/buikter 
has 2 magnificent atone 
fireplaces, 2-1/2 baths, walk 
out basement with beautiful 
view of water. Dock at own pier. 
Hardwood floors throughout. 
Located In Meyers 
Lake/Platakee Bay. OPEN 
HOUSE EVERY SUNDAY 
from 12-5pm. Call for 
directions. Contract sale also 
possible. Other real estate also 
available (615)344-3321 

50-TF;39-17 
UNION DROVE, Wl, 1 1/2 
atory ftouse. New basement, 
(3)bedroom8, (1) bath, ateel 
siding on house, (10) new 
windows, garage. Lot size, 
ee'xISZ*. $65,000. (414)878- 
3156. 

50-37-123 
WINTHROP HARBOR, 
NEAR marina. Custom built 
Sbedroom raised ranch, with 
fireplace, brick and cedar 
home on large beautifully 
wooded lot. $224,900. For 
more Information, Call: 
(708)746-2437. 

50-37-124 
CUTE HOME BY OWNER. 
4813 29lh Avenue, Kenosha, 
Wisconsin. 2 bedroomis, large 
fenced yard, pool and deck, 
$72,000. (414)654-4341 for 
appointment, 

50-37-125 
McHENRY. BY OWNER, 
(4) bedroom, 1 1/2 bath 
Ranch, 1 1/2 car attached 
garage, big dty lot, low taxes. 
Asking $103,500. (815)385- 
5783. 

50-37-128 





llotno.H 
Kor H«nl 



FOR RENTIII 2 bedroom, 
• II year round cottage on 
Third Late. $650 per month + 
utilities. 1 1/2 month security 
deposit required. (312}027* 
8355. 

51-36-62 
COZY 2-BlbROOM 2 
story f»use. Chain of Lakes 
area. New carpet, air, in 
INGLESrOE. $600/mo No 
pets please. (708)587-6609. 

51-36-22 
HOUSE FOR RENT, 
Gray slake, 3 bedroom, $650 
+8ecurlty deposit. Garage 
available. (708)223-3562 Call 
between 8am -4pm. 

51-36-162 



LEGAL NOTICE 

PUBLICATION IS EASY 

AND CONVENIENT IN 

LAKEIAND 

NEWSPAPERS 

An invitation is extended to 
public bodies, attorneys, 
businesses and private citi- 
zens to use the publica- 
tions of Lakeland 
Newspapers for conve- 
nient, efficient and eco- 
nomical publication 
required for Legal Notice 
by Ihe State of Illinois 
statutes. 
Legal notices may be 
placed in person at our 
centrally located business 
office, 30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake, 50030. or sent 
by mail or FAX, 708-223- 
8810. The telephone num 
beris70B-223-8161. 
The 14 community news 

taper publications of 
akeland Newspapers 
meet all Ihe statutory 
requirements (or Legal 
Notice in Lake County. I" 
Our rates are economical 
and our deadline is the lat 
est In Lake County. We 
regularly provide publica 
lion service under the tight 
est lima restrictions. 
The Lakeland staff is expe 
rienced in the unique 
requirements for Public 
Nolice. We are ready to 
assist with your questions 
and all your Public Nolice 
needs. For questions and 
rate Information, please 
call Chris Kenyon at 708- 
223-81 61 . Let us serve you 
wilh Legal Notice publica- 
tion. Thank you. 

The Publisher 
Lakeland Newspapers 



llomes 
For Rent 



RENTAL- 2 BEDROOM. 1 

bath home In Round Lake 
Beach available now. Security 
deposit required. No pets. 
(708)746-4550 after 2pm only 
pteaae. 

.51-37-106 
ANTIOCH- Available 
NOWl BRAND-NEW 2 
BEDROOM trwnhome with 
central air, appliances, 
basement, 1 car garage. 
$795/month -i-aecurlty. No 
peU. (706)872-1880. 
51 -37-20/0 
SPECIAL 3 -bedroom, 3 
bath tri-level, large family 
room with masonary fireplace, 
privacy fenced yard, 2-1/2 car 
garoge. NEAR to toll roads. 
OPEN SUNDAY Ito 5PM. 
REDUCED to Sell at 
$154,900. LINDENHURST by 
Owner. (708)356-2616. 

51-36-93 
(2) BEDROOM, CLEAN, 
FURNISHED HOME, kleal for 
seniors, quiet area, plus 
utilities and security deposit. 
$650 per month. (706)546- 
1612. 

51-37-127 
LAKEFRONT COTTAGE 
FOR RENT, $1,000 deposit, 
No pets, $775 per month. 
Forest Lake (708)438-2987 
eves or (708)391-8348 (8- 
430pm). 

51-37-60 
ROUND LAKE, 2 bedroom' 
home. No pets. Sub-lease to 
5/1/93 $555/month -i-utilltles. 
(708)546-1508 or (708)831- 
5550. 

51-37-10 
BRAND-NEW 2 Bedroom 
townhome In Antioch, central 
air, appliances, basement, 1 
car garage, $795/month 
•i-security. Ho pels. (708)872- 
1860. 

51-37-20/G 
SMALL COTTAGE, single 
dwelling, no pets, non- 
smokers. $500 month 
4Securlty. All utilities Included, 
except phone. (708)223-0729 
(Grayslake area). 

.51-36:2 3 

[lomce 
Wanlcd 




Condoa/ 
Town Homee 



FOR SALE BY OWNER- 1 

bedroom, Fox Lake, Bi-lowel 
Row home. Lease with option 
possible. $31,000 (312)334- 
6165 after 7pm. 

54-37-27 

MUNDELEIN- LOCH 

LOMOND. Quad level home, 4 
bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, 2 1/2 
garage, brick patto and 
driveway, quiet cul-de-sac, ]ust 
1 block to private beach. Built 
In 1977. Original owner. 
Asking $210,000. (708)566- 
5255. 

54-36-137 




WAUCONDA ONLYI HauH 
Wanted 2/3 bedroom. Need 
lease option 18months to 
purchase. Any Inquiries call 
(708)824-2946. 

52-36;:2 4 

Homes 

BuildGrs 




WAUSAU 
HOMES 

Quality built homes in 

Southeastern Wisconsin 

and Northeastern Illinois, 

Featuring custom designs 

utilizing the latest in 

energy efficient products and 

building techniques. 

COME SEE OUR NEW MODEL 

Located In Eagles Nasi, Anlioch 
Open Mon. and Wed. 

1 to 5 pm only 
Call for appointment 

(708)265-0230 
BuscHmati 
Companies 



Sell Your Home 

In the Lakeland Classifieds! 
call 

(708} 223-8161 




4-TOWNHOMES - Zion. 

Excellent condition, high net, 
excellent owner occupied. 
Owner will finance with 
cOIateral. (708)356-1812. 

_ 60-36-35 
WOODSTOCK 2 LEVEL 
townhome, 2 bedrooms, 2 
bath, famlly/dlning 
combination. Living room with 
cathedral ceilings. All 
appliances stay, 1 car garage, 
fenced yard, excellent 
condition. $83,500. (815)337- 
2006. 

54-36-28 

GRAYSLAKE INCOME OR 
Starter home. 3 bedroom 
Townhouse, living room, 
dining room, kitchen wilh 
stove, refrigerator and 
dishwasher, central air, end 
unit fadng open field, garage, 
swimming pool and dubhouse. 
Have renters until October, 
$850 month rent. Excellent 
Income opportunity. $82,500. 
(708)223-5484. 

54-36-138 

FOR SALE BY OWNER. 
Don't miss this onel 2 story 
condo, Plymouth Farms area- 
Vernon Hills location. 2 
bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath, living 
room, dining area, 1 car 
attached garage, neutral odor 
brand new carpet, upgraded 
kitchen cabinets, tiles, much 
more. Must see to appreciate. 
$74,000. Call Art (708)680- 
3657. 

54-36-63 




ROUND LAKE BEACH, by 

owner, (2) bedroom 
Townhome, 3 years new, 1 1/2 
baths, (1) car garage, central 
air, fireplace, stove, 
refrigerator, dishwasher, 
disposal, washer and dryer, 
excellent location, $68,900. 
(708)362-4203, after 6pm. 

54-37-128 
GRAYSLAKE. Ilk* new 
Townhouse with garage, (3) 
bedroom, (2) baths, air 
conditioning. $900 per month 
+ utilities + $1,000 security 
deposit NO PETS. (708)587- 
6S03. 

54-37-61 
FOR RENT, (3) bedroom 
tri-level, agent owned, no 
pets, leas© or monih to month, 
$775. Call Jane (708)546- 
2666. 

54.37-62 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 23433 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIH OWN ATTORNEYS BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is iiereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered in the above entitled cause on April 24, 1992. 

I. Alan Mills, special commissioner for inis court will on 

September 30, 1992 at the hour of 1 :30 p.m. at the front 

door of tfie Lake Courthouse, 18 North County Street, 

Waukegan , titinois, sell to the highest bidder tor cash, 

the following described premises: 

125 N. Cora Ave., Fox Lake, IL 60020 
The improvements on the property consists of a single 
family, wood frame, two story with an attactied garage. 
Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance 
within 24 hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale 
shall be subject to general taxes and to special 
assessment 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 
The judgement amount was $78,105.33. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
receipt of sale whicn will entitle the purchaser to a deed 
on a specified date unless the properly is redeemed 
according to law, subject to Court's approval. 
For information call the Sales Ollicer at Plaintiff's 
Attomey, Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, 
Illinois. (312) 372-4784 from 1:00 pm. to 3:00 p.m., 
however under Illinois law, the Sales Officer is not 
required to provide additional information other than that 
set forth in this notice. 



Lakokind N«wspap«n 33 



?t 



ir. 



^ 



i 



t 

& 

l;.L 




Mobile 
lTom«B 



m 



IBSB 14x70. 3b«drooffl, 2 

bath home, located t mtle 
north of Illinois border off 
Sfierldan Rd. $18,000 
(414)042-0680 Of (414}6g4- 
0707. 

55-37-9g/G 
MOBILE HOME, 2 
Badroom, central air, all 
appliances, patio, shed. In 
Woodland Park, Wauconda. 
$14,500 (708)526-1954. 

55-37-21 
HOLLY PARK 14'x8«'; (3) 
bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, aun 
porch. Includes appliances 
and curtains. Asking $23,900. 
(414)763-9073. 

55-3663 
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE 
by owner $6,000 or best offer. 
(708)530-1773 Of (708)356- 
2437. 

55-37764 




MUST SELLIII 52'x14', 2 
bedroom mobile home with 
deck. Includes stove, 
refrigerator, washer, dryer, 
ceiling fan. (2) air conditioners, 
shed. Located on quiet street 
in Maple Grove Estates. Nice 
yard. Must sell as soon as 
possible. Make offer. 
(708)360-0911 After 5pm. 

55-36-65 
MOBILE HOME. 14x80' 
Marahfield Manor House, (3) 
bedroom, central air, fireptace, 
step-down living room, bay 
window, water softener, shed 
with electric, all appliances 
Included, Lakewood Estates, 
Silver Lake, Wisconsin. Must 
seel Must selilt (414)889- 
8197. 

55-37-129 
BUYING NEW AND USED 
mobile homes for cash, 1-30&- 
452-0646, 1(800)747-5467. 
Selling new and used mobile 
homes for less. Free statewide 
delivery and service, 1-800- 
537-7743. 

55-00-00/G 



PIONEER 
ESTATES 

Southeast WIsconotn's 

finest manufactured 

housing community 

•Cily water & sewer 

•Fitness/recreation 

building 
•In-ground pool 
•Minutes away from 

golfing, boating & 

dog track 

See our 1993 
Mobile Home at the 
Walworth Coun^ Fair 

Sept. 2-7 
PIONEER ESTATES 
LAKE GENEVA, Wl 
(414)248-3831 



1 




ApurlrnenlH 
For Rem 



: LARGE ONE AND TWO 

bedroom apartments in Lake- 
Villa $515 and $630/momh. 
(708)356-5474. 

56-37-65 
SPACIOUS TWO bedroom. 
Heat, water, and appliances 
furnished. Lease and security 
required. No pels. (708)336- 
4961 after 6pm. 

56-36-1 11/G 
FURNISHED-FOX UKE. 2 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath with 
washer and dryer. Utilities 
Included. Call 

(home#)(708)29g-5442 or 
(apartment) (708)587-5083. 

56-36-112 
NEAR BASE- Furnished 1- 
bedroom apartment, off street 
parking, $400/monih +aecurity. 
Stack Realty (708)689-2500. 

56-36-27/G 
3 DEOROOM APARTMENT 
In downtown Grayslake. 
available Oct. 1st. $550 month. 
Security deposit required. Call 
Mike days at (70€}96S-0160 or 
eves (708)724-5342. 
56-37-28 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- 

3-1/2 miles west of Lake 
County College, on 
Washington. 2 bedroom 
apartment available, air 
conditioned. Heat, water and 
gas included. No pets or 
waterbeds. $S25/mo. 
(708)328-6674. 
. . S6-34-109 



Apurltpenii 
For Rent 




Apurltnents 
For Rent 



ffi 



c 



i 



LAKESIDE 
LUXURY 

APARTMEHTSI 

•Microwave ovens 

•Washers & dryers 

•Vaufted ceilings 

•Patios or balconies 
•Dishwashers 

•Convenient localion 

(708)356-0800 

>705 Water's Edge Dr.- 
Lake Villa. IL ^ 

^OnHout* 132 (Qrand Aw.) JMt^ 
(tolRcwla«3«tth»MUlh *\ 



■hJv.QlDMpLriw 
ijwnfftdtff 






ONE BEDROOM 
SPECIALl 

Deep Lal<e Hertnitage 

has spacious 1 & 2 

bedrooin apartments. 

tf you enjoy the quiet 

country you'll love 

Deep Lane Hermitage I 

Appliances included, 

ample doset space, 

wall to wall carpet, 

tennis & basketball 

courts, a tot lot & 

laundry facilities 

available. 

Sorry No Pets. 

Call: 

(708) 356-2002 

For more informatkin 

Mon.-Fri., 9 am-6 pm 

Equal Housing 

Opportunity 



iniiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS | 

1 318 W. Forest Avenue s 

1 Round Lake. IL b 

I NOW RENTING | 

1 t & 2 bedroom Units i 



Subsiciized Housing 



$100.00 OFF RRST MOMTH'S RENT 
Move In August or September and Save!!! 

WESTWIND VILLAGE iff ARTIIENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave. 
Zion, IL 

Completely Remodeled 

1 & 2 Bedrooms 

New Carpet & Appliances 

Custom Blinds 

Security Lobby 

On-Site Manager 

Rents starting at $495.00 

Heat included 

No Pets 

Call Manager to view 

708-872-5404 

♦Applies to applications 

accepted in August or 

September with a signed 

one year lease 




AparlmcniB 

For R«'nl 

APARTMENT RENTALS 

Available now in Downtown 
Island Lake. Within bultding of 
small businesses. Call lor 
details. (706)526-5000. 
56-36-31 

LAKE BLUFF- . 1 & 
2b«droom apartments. 
Laundry facilities, pool, 
clubhouse. $535 to 
$595/month. includes Heat. 
(706)615-9717. 

G56-34/rF-199/L 

LAKE ZURICH- ONE 
Bedroom garage apartment. 
Dining-living room, laundry, 
gaj-age, No pets. $450/month 
4Uttiitie3 and security deposit 
References Required. 
(708)438-2919. 

56-36-30 



I (708) 546-6800 | 

I isi Equal Housing Opportunity | 
miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiii 



^^ater^s Edge 
Apartmetits 

V Scenic Country Setting 

► Stocked Fistiing Pond 

,* Private Patios or Balconies 
¥ Dishwashers, FREE gas, heat Cf cooking 

► One (J rwo bedroom w/ spacious floor plans 

► Minutes from train, 1-94 C* shopping 

C708) 587-€>888 



"A City Lifestyle In A Country Setting" 

Enjoy Spacious 1 & 2 bedroom Apartment Homes 

in a quiet, park-lil<e setting from only ^o20i 

YOUR HOME WILL INCLUDE: 

• Remodeled kitchen/bath 

• Full carpeting 

• Central Air 

• Free heat & cooking gas 

• Balcony/patio 

• Swimming/tennis/saunas 

• On site management/maintenance 
For Lal<e County's Best Apartment Value 

call (708) 662-2273 

_336 N. Green Bay Rd. on Gurnee/Waukegan Border^ 



WHISPERING 

OAKS 
APARTMENTS 

2443 Dugdale Road 

Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

NOW AVAILABLE 

1 , 2, & 3 Bedroom 

Apartments starting at 

$400.00 

Free Heal. CookinQ Gas, 

Water. Free Pnrking, Balconies 

w'ih most apartments. 

Can for tho manager's ront 

incentive. 

708-336-4400 

Open Mon-Fri 9-6 

Sat. 9-5 

Equal Housing Opportunity 



Ingleslde 

*$0.00 
pay* lat month's rant 
$300Daposlt 
on 
Ona & Two Btdrooma 
•Spacious 
•Privata Balconlaa 
^REEHaat 
■Short Tarm Laaaas avail. 
LAKEVIEW APARTMENTS 

(708J 507-9277 
*navif rastdant, 1 yr (aaaa 



COZY 2 LEVEL condo in 

Vacation Village, 1 bedroom, 
partially furnished, 24 hour 
security. $450/month 
+aecurity. (312)637-6216. 
56-37-158 

FREE ROOM AND BOARD- 
in exdiange for taking care of 
my 84yr. old father. Small 
salary also provided. Must 
have prior experiance, 
excellent references and be 
able to cook. Patience and a 
kind heart essential. You will 
live on a beautiful 5 acre estate 
with use of Inside, year round 
swimming pod, spa, sauna, 
basketball/tennis courts and 
many other amenities. 
(70B)35e-e200 or (708)356- 
8209 after 5pm. 

56-37-97 
RUSSELL, ILL. ONE 
bedroom, 1-mile from 1-94. 
Quiet area. t340/month 
+utllitlea and security. 
(708)395-7648. 

56-36-24 
LAK$ VILLA. 2 BEDROOM 
Duplex with 2 bath, garage, 
appliances. No pets cr 
waterbeds. Nice area. 
t875/month (706)396^105. 

56-37-25 
AVAILABLE SEPT. 10 
LEISURE VILLAGE: 2 
Bedroom. 1 bath, all electric. 
24-hour security, ftopets. No 
garage. 1 year minimum 
lease. $550 per month 
•tutltitlea and security and 
references. (Retirement 
Community), (70a}690-a264. 

56-37-26 
LARGE STUDIO CONDO 
available, lurnlshed or 
unfumlshed, Fox Lake. Call for 
details. (708)587-9570. 

56-37-27 
NEAR BASE- UNFURN- 
ISHED (2) bedroom 
apartment, new carpeting, off 
street parking, $475 per month 
•I- security. Stack Realty 
(706)689-2500. 

56-36-28 

WAUCONDA 2 BEDROOM 

apanmeni, heat and hot water, 
stove and refrigerator 
Included. 1525/month, lease 
and security. kJeal for couple. 
No pets, available Sept. 10. 
(706)433-0891. 

5fl-37*?P 

WAUCONDA- 1 bedroom 

apartment, heat and hot water, 
stove and refrigerator 
included. $500/month, lease, 
and security. No pets. 
Available Sept 10 (708)433- 
0891. ,, .L 

56-37-23 



Aparlmcnls 
Fnr Ront 



~^H 



Farms 



ONE BEDROOM 

APARTMENT, heated, 
carpeted, on Water. 
$550/month 31 S. PIstakee 
Lake Rd. Fox Lake (708)362- 
7318. 

(1) ~ BEDROOM 

APARTMENT ON Fox Lake, 

private patio with lake view. 
Heat included, $500 per 
month. . Available now! 
(706)567-0840. 

56-37-130 
CHATEAU ROYALE 

APARTMENT, Just east of 
Lakehurst. Spacious 

(l)bedroom, new carpel, 
paint, stove, refrigerator, 
private balcony, hot water, 
heat, and cooking gas 
provided. Sauna, exerdse ar»d 
community room, air 
conditioned, lots of storage. 
Garage available, $610 per 
month. (708)244-5121 or 

56-39-131 

GRAYSLAKE- VICTORIAN 
APARTMENT, downstairs, (2) 
bedroom, targe dining room, 
fenced yard, sun porch, 
laundry Included. r4ear town 
and train. Also short-term 
Victorian (2) flat bottom 
apartment, (2) bedroom, large 
dining, Ug yard. BothavailaUe 
Immediately. (708)223-4581. 
56-37-31 



Apts./IIomee 
To Share 



91 



MIDDLE AGED WOMAN 
looking to share her fumished 
townhome in Vernon Hills. 
$475 montfi including utilities. 
Carol (708)816-3525 after 
5pm. 

58-36-65 
NON-SMOKING 
PROFESSIONAL Mate or 
Female, to share newly 
renovated house In 
Wauconda, with (2) others. 
$300 + 1/3 ulititiBS. (708)526- 
3203. 



58-37-32. 



Bub. Froperi 
For Rent 



9 



LARGE AND SHALL 
Businen space rentals JUST 
now available In downtown 
lslar>d Lake. For more details 
contact Jenry (708)526-0623. 
61-37-33 



1^ 



FOR RENT 



"^ 



I2L 



1,200 sq.ft. 

professional office 

in downtown 

Fox Lake. 

(Grand Ave.) 

t Private entrance, 

air condition, 

newer building. 

Perfect for Jaw 

office, accountant, 

small business, 

etc. Off street 

parking. Excellent 

condition. 

Immediate 

Occupancy 

Reasonable Rent 



(708) 587-4245 



51 



INDUSTRIAL 
SPACE 



FOUNTAIN HEAD 

CORPORATE CENTER 

ON RT.12 IN RICHMOND 

Si4>erior 2,400, 4.800 . 

square loot unit 

*For Industry or Business 

Overhead door/dod( 

A/C Office 

LAND MANAGEMENT 

(815) 678-4771 





BY OWNER. LOT #9. Oak 

Valley Estates. Spring Grove, 
IL (708)587-7302. 

63-36-140 
BETWEEN CRYSTAL LAKE 
AND WOODSTOCK, 44 Acre 
near McHenry County Cottefie, 
1370ft road frantage. $7,500 
oeracra. (407)461-7749. 
1 ACRE LAKE LOT. 
130x300 Fischer Estates, 
Stockholm Drive, ingleslde. 
Exclusive subdivision. Fish 
Creek Addition. Call today 
(708)223-5383. 

8-1/2 A^R^"^'*WOODED 

PROPERTY in Krandon, 
Wisconsin. Many lakes, 
perfect for hunting, fishing, 
and snowmoblllng. Off of 
blacktop road. Approximately 
250 miles north. $4,000 or 
trade. (708)740-3630. 
63-36-141 




Kcsorl/Vac. 
fliinlalH 

CLASS A MEMBERSHIP In 

Green Meadows Resort In 
Round Lake Beach, $1,800 or 
best Membership dues paid 
through March 1994. 
(708)972-1552. 



(^ul or Area 
Properly 




MONTANA HAVEN 

leOO'f Acre ranch. Meadows, 
flowing creek plus breathtak- 
ing view of 3 MnL ranges. 
3 Homes, ect. $2,000,000.00, 
Sidwell Land & Cattle Co. 

1-406-322-4425 



$INVESTMENT$ 

COLORADO 

GAMING PROPERTY 

Operating Casino in Cripple 

Creek. Other gaming 

properties avail. 

Gold Country Realty, 
1-800-748-2060 



COLORADO 

Beautitul, fully & elegant fur- 
nished 5 bdrm, 3 blh home 
ovfirtooWng lake. Hour's drive 
to Aspen. Only $3g5K. 
Irene Schumacher Broker. 
303/963-2211 or 303/963-1527 
CR&W/S Realty 



HAWAII 

Koni anoitvs 444 hone w/sepante 

apL Saofica at $220,000 urKter 

replacemem costs for $69S,000. 

4 ml kxm upandtig hospkal. 

Exfensve He & granhe wApMaoiar 

posSne view. Owner Dan Cronrwel, 

CaiUl.REftUXPROPERTESL 

1-800-747-4833 



MONTANA, new custom 

timber frame home on 

beautiful llalhead lake, 

3+3 1/2. 2700 sf, spec vus, 

boat dodt, 30 min 10 Big 

Fork, 8 area golf courses, 

skiing, sailing , lishing. 

406-844-2070. 



EAGUE SPRING 
LAKE, WISCONSIN 

Uiw ft«nl hoRMAy oanM. Vmt 'round. 



6 niM. 2 bAtn A (powiilfl S rd bdmf 

Hvtily fMnodilvfUnofly plrM 
{Wtf ^BpSWIOi. N4V IfiplSWBi^ Md. 

PrtMl>plir,2 1/3 ea ga. ivga Itt 

•oodKi iol, ifrinB W Wv, i^ MnAid 

ttt^latm, EidsMd aai porch. 

t1UM0.1-414-S4MM1. 



AU^BAMA/MONROEVILLE- 
RETIRE TO SUNHY ALABAMA- 
LOW CRIMi-LOW TAXES! 
4000 Sst. Dutch Colonial SBR, 
3blh, ori 4+ ac hardwood firs, 
guest house lenoed pool, tram- 
cured lawn & gardens, sheds. 
r4EAR hlODEHN HOSPITAL 
$205K. 205-743-264a. 



ARIZONA 

5350 sq. ft executive honoe. 

3 bd, 3 ba, indoor pool. 

Amenities gak}ret 1 hr. 

from Tticson. 120 ac. w 
spectacular views. $595K. 

By Owrwr. 602/64^3221 



UTJUiUEAA ^Aftk dTV-^M' 

HOBBY HANCKINDIV. OR 
COflP. RETREAT. 

22 (n)g«ttd m, 14 ac new «lal- 

I*, e ac grau, 4 br brick hornet 

conals, outUdfis. GET AWAY 

FfKM rr AUt »3S0K. Ownw/ngt. 

ASSET BnOKERAOE 

801-654-2231 /eS4-393a 



WASHINGTON, 

watch (ho whales go by, stunning 

Pugol Sound & Minview. elegant 

ebd. 4 ba homo. 2 kits.. 2 msir sles,, 

itg pvt fenced yid. ono of Seatllo 

most prestigious areas, only S475K. 

Call Carl R.E. 2000'CORP 

206-62S-3000;2{>6-399-Oa4-|. 




Oul or Area 
Proiicrly 

LAKE GENEVA AREA 1991 
Skyline Mobile Home, 
70"Lx16"W, under warranty. 2 
bedrooms, 2 baths, vaulted 
celling and fans, central air, 
storms, stove, refrigerator, 
washer and dryer, drapes and 
mini-bllnbs, city sewer, water 
cable. Large tot In new section 
with use of pool, fitness center, 
and playground. BY OWNER. 
$32,900. (414)248-3446. 
65-36-142 

Cemetery 
Lots 



iSl 



FOR SALE BY OWNER, (1) 

lot with 4-grave sites, North 
Shore Garden of Memories 
Cemeiary. Priced below 
market value. Call (708)562- 
3966 after 4pm. 

66-TF/39-3S 

(2) BURIAL ESTATES In 

Highland Memorial Park, Lot 
f73, $1,000 or best offer. 
(708)623-0985, between 
10am-7pm. 

66-37-132 



Kcul Estate 
Wanted 




WANT TO RENT. Garage 

or other small building with 
overhead door. Over eOOsq.ft. 
Must have electric and not be 
damp. For long term storage 
or company files. Call 
(708)485-2560. 

56-36-14 




MUST SACRIFICE 

TRAVEL TRAILER, 25ft. 
1989 Aljo, self contained, very 
dean, must sell, $7,200 or best 
offer. (708)838-1518. 

70-38-67 
STORAGE SPACE. 

Suitable for boat, camper, 
car, or motorhome. Steel 
building at my Union Grove 
home. (414)878-3304. 

70-37-32 
MOTORHOME- 1977 
Southwind, 26ft. 56,000 miles, 
air, generator, twin beds, 
sleeps 6. Excellent condition. 
$11,500(414)534-4781. 

70-36.36 
1988 23FT. RV 

MOTORHOME. (9,!>25 original 
tow mtlos). sleeps 6. $22,000, 
loaded. (708)662-0746. 

70-37-36/G 
MOTORHOME, 1979 
DODGE TROPHY, sleeps 6, 
generator, awning, 68,000 
miles. Must seel $8,500 or 
best offer. (815)653-3846. 

70-36-143 
JET SKIHI 1991 Super Jet, 
with sticker kit, brand new. 
Must Belli $3,500. (708)526- 
3326. 

70-36-144 

Saowmobile 

ATVb 



^^ra 



SNOWMOBILEI SKI-DOO 

BLIZZARD 6500, new, rebuilt 
400, runs good, looks good, 
570 miles, $600 or best offer. 
(708)223-0799. 

71-36-145 



ItoatB/Motor 
Etc. 



M 



22-1/2fl. SAILBOAT, 

Pearson Ensign, $4,500. All 
offers considered. Must Belli 
(708)473-2262. 

72-36-42/G 
1988 21 ft. BAYLINER 
Capri, 230hp Exceitent 
condition, Exceiiant stereo, 
Asking $12.500/best offer 
(703)369-5798. 

72-36-72 
1071 CENTURY MARK IL 
455 ads/Berkley. 1 of 6 made, 
rare trailer, (2)covers. Must 
seel $4,000 or best offer 
(708)395-8714 or (708)387- 
0805. 

72-37-6a 
1990 TRACKER, PARTY 
HUT. 30ft. Pontoon with llShp 
Mercury outboard, trailer, 
custom canvas, trolling motor, 
etectric arwhors, many extras. 
•Must seef $26,000 invested 
asking $16,000 (708)820- 
1424. 

72-37*117 

BOAT- 1974 25H. Baytlner. 

New canvas, (4}downrlggBrs, 
new outdrive, ship-to-shore 
radio, trailer. $7,500 (708)746- 
3800. ' 

72-37-68 



34 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, September 4, 1992 




V. •■^^ 



CarB 



EA 1991 

Home, 
irranty. 2 
, vaulted 
intral air, 
rigerator, 
apes and 
!BU water 
iW section 
ss center, 
OWNER. 
446. 




fNER, (1) 

es, North 
Wemorlas 
id below 
(708)562- 

5 

ATES In 

Park, Lot 

eat offer. 

between 




. Garaga 

Iding with 
tr GOOsq.ft. 
and not be 
m storage 
,es. Call 




CRIFICE 

ER, 2Sft. 
[alnod, very 
,200 Of best 
16. 
7 

SPACE. 
It, camper, 
ime. Steel 
nion Grove 
J04. 
2 

1977 
6,000 miles, 
twin beds, 
It condition. 
4781. 
6 

r. R V 

!^5 original 
6. $22,000, 
>746. 

, 1979 

f, sleeps 6, 
ig, 68,000 
$8,500 or 
a-3846. 
\3 

Supsr Jat, 
brand new. 
(, {708)526- 

44 

!9 

SKI-DOO 

new, rebuilt 
looks good, 
or best offer. 

AILBOAT. 

, $4,500. All 
I. Must Selll 

2/G 

BAYLINER 
' Excellent 
llent stereo, 
>/best offer 

72 

r MARK II. 

. 1 of 6 made, 
covers. Must 
' beat offer 
or (708)387- 

66 

IR, PARTY 

>nwith115hp 
ard, trailer, 
rolling motor, 
many extras. 
000 invested, 
) (708)820- 

67 

H. Bayllner. 

idownriggers, 
»hip-to-3hore 
iOO {708}746- 

68 



-':•??, 



'^m 



RECREATIOISTAL 



^1^^ 



BoalB/Molor 
Etc. 

1 s 9 i* i"f I . 

SIMOKERCRAFT, tiller ateer 
75hp Mercury, Shorelander 
trailer, MIm-Kota trolling 
motor, Eagle Magna II $8,000 
or best Call mornings 
(708)587-0315. 

72-33-124 
GRADY WHITE 20-1/2tt. 
Center Console Fishing Boat. 
Lake Michigan ready. Many 
extras, rebuilt 140hp outboard, 
$5,500. (708)263-7241. 

72-36-148 

BOAT ige3'HENKEN-l7' 

120 I/O Lake Michigan ready 
to Tish for the big ones or to 
pleasure cmfse, asking $5,300 
or best offer. (708)378-9053. 

72-36-148 
17' 1972 CENTURY 
RAVEN, 125hp Johnson 
outboard, newer seats, 
everything goes with it, 
excellent condition. $2,800. 
(815)338-8568. 

72-36-146 
BOAT TRAILER E-Z 
LOADER CVUR3000 model, 
16WT-2150 tires, 775x14. 
$570 or best offer. (706)356- 
0444. 

72-36-147 
PONTOON BOAT. 1990, 
20' SUNCRUI5ER, combo fish 
and pleasure. 40hp, very low 
hours, has live well and rod 
holders, radio cassette, like 
new condition. Asking $9,000 
or best offer. (414)763-1736. 

72-36-148 
PONTOON BOAT. 24ft. 
115hp Mariner, full furniture, 
very good condition, $4,000 or 
trade for? (708)526-0680. 

72-36-149 
1988 MASTERCRAFT 
TRISTAR 220 Open Bow, 454 
425hp with trailer and custom 
cover, low hours, $17,500 or 
best offer. (815)363-1645. 

72-36-150 
BOAT, 20n. TAYLOR JET 
BOAT, 1984, bought new in 
1986, 454 Berkle/, 63 MPIH. 
Great ski and crulsel Excellent 
condition, $6,300. (815)385- 
0441. 

72-36-151 
24t1. SLICKCRAFT 235 
boat with Calkins trailer with 
electric winch, $5,600 or best 
offer. (708)556-7671. 

72-36-68 
20n. CENTURY 235HP 
Open bow with Calkins trailer, 
$4,250. (815)675-6370. 

72-36-69 
CENTURY 4000 21ft. 
CUDDY Cabin, 260hp 
Mercruiser, full camper 
canvas, like new, head, bar, 
trailer. Very good condition. 
$8,500 or best offer. 
(815)459-5070 Days or 
(708)359-7165 Evenings. 

72-36-70 
1991 HARRIS FLOAT- 
BOAT Pontoon Boat, llShp 
Evinrude, 25 gallon tank, all 
covers Included, $7,950. For 
more lnformatk>n: (706)395- 
7445. 

72-36-133 
ir SEA NYMPH, 78hp, 
outboard, trailer, fish or aki, 
$1,700. (708)587-2733. 

72-37-134 
MUST SACRIFICE!! 
Radue«d $2,000, 1987 Sea 
Ray Monaco, 21ft. cuddy 
cabin, 26Shp, mint condition. 
low hours, E-Z load trailer, slip 
for 1992. $15,000. (70e]520- 
4307. 

72-37-135 



Sports • 
Equipment 



ffi 



SCUBA GEAR FOR SALE. 

BCD Plus regulators, US dh/er 
type. Monitor II dive computer. 
And ail acoessorfes. 2 years 
old. $1,000. (708)223-2093, 
75-36-152 

GOLF CLUBS- 1,3,5 
Woods, 3-p irons, almost 
Newl $200 or best offer 
(708)973-0149. 

75-34/rF-35/G 

SOLOFLEX WITH leg and 

butterfly attachments, $700 
Loud speaker, 15' woofer and 
4 tweeters, $350. Golf clubs, 
Irons, and woods, $50 
(708)360-1276. 

75-37-69 




Cars 
For Sale 



1984 DATSUN MAXIMA- 

orlginal owner, ail options, Rrat 
$2,300 or best offer TakesI 
AND 1979 Mercedes 450SEL, 
Immaculatel (708]926-0134. 

60-36-3g/G 

1984 CHRYSLER 

NEWYORKER, all power. 4 
cylinder, 4 door, very clean, 
runs greatl $1,600/best otfer. 
(708)689-8815. 

eO-36-40/G 

ATTENTION 

COLLECTORSIll 1973 
Chevy Nova, 22,300 orlglnai 
miles, original tires. Interior like 
new, exterior, VERY little rust, 
ains and looks great, $3,200 
or best offer. (708)680-6544. 
80-36-79 

1984 OLDS NINETY 
EIGHT REGENCY Brougham, 
Arizona car, very clean, 
$2,995. (708)223-2814, 

80-36-80 
1962 MUSTANG GT, 5.0L. 
good condition, $i.800ybest. 
Days (708)872-8772 or 
Evenings (708)872-9695. 

80-36-81 

' 1991 FORD ESCORT GT, 

24,000 miles, one owner, 
garaged, 5 speed, till, cruise, 
air, am/fm cassette, security 
system, well maintained, 
$9,500 or best offer. Electric 
dryer, 6 months old, $150. 
(708)838-2217 or (708)578- 
4487. 

60-36-82 

1990 LINCOLN 
CONTINENTAL, dark blue, 
excellent shape, $15,500. 
1981 DATSUN 280-ZX needs 
minor work $1,100. 1987 
HONDA Civic, 2 door, excellent 
shape, $2,500. (414)877- 
9085. 

80-36-157 

1991 FIREBIRD, rtd/gray 
Interior, V8, power steering, 
air, am/fm stereo, clean car, 
no rust, no dents, garage kept, 
$12,000 or best otfer. 
(414)279-3708. 

80-36-155 
1987 HONDA ACCORD. 
34,000 miles, extended 
warranty, one owner, mint 
condition. $7,995. (708)816- 
0317. 

80-36-156 



For Sale 




CONVERTIBLEIII 1987 
CORVETTE-, rod on red, 
automatic, 28,000 miles, 
$19,000. (815)675-2172. 

80-36-76 
197S. DODGE UAQNUH. 
New motor, transmlasion. rear 
end and exhaust 8* Aluminum 
tmckcap. (708)546-7801. 

80-37-145 
1991 MUSTANG QT. 8- 
■psad, aJI power, sunroof, 
electrfc Wue/gray, gray Interior, 
only 8,202 miles, $12,500. 
(708)680-9322. 

80-37-148 
197e CHEVETTE, 2-door, 
fldck, low miles, $950 or best 
offer. (708)662-2248. after 
6pm. 

80-37-147 
MQB, 1974, FRESH 
ENGINE, rMW electric, driven 
dally, very good condition, roll 
bar. $3,500 or best offer. 
(708)381-9806 or (706)382- 
4090, Glert. 

80-37-146 
19B5 IROC. MUST SEE! 
$4,8 or best offer. 
(708)336-8783. 

80-36-136 
1983 DATSUN 280ZX, 
automatic, air, all power, 
am/fm cassette, T-tops, one 
owner. (708)623-6393. 

80-36-137 
1965 OLDS CUTLASS 
CIERA, excellent running 
condition, air conditioning, 
sunroof, power locks, 
windows, seats, tape decti, 
$3,600. (414)857-6621 or 
(708)816-2261. 

80-36-138/6 
1982 BMW 6201, good 
runnar, 4-speed, 6 cylinder, 
$1,500 or best offer. 
(708)395-1170. 

80-36-73 
1982 CHEVY CELEBRITY, 
■Ir conditioning, power 
steering, power brakes, am/fm 
cassette, excellent condition. 
$1,500 or best offer. 
(708)740-1908. 

80-36-74 
CORVETTE, 1979; T-lopt, 
very low miles, am/fm stereo 
cassetie, good condition, 
$6,500 OR BEST OFFERIII 
(706)548-7718. 

80-36-37/G 
MUST SEEIil 1991 

ESCORT WAGON, excellent 
condition, automatic, power 
locks, cruise, rear defroster, 
tilt, low mileage, am/fm 
caisetta. $8,000. Call Mary 
after 5pm (708)S6&-B468. 

80-37-38 
1983 . HONDA CIVIC 
wagon, In good condition, 1- 
owner, have record of ail 
maintenance. Asking $1,800 
(706)473-2752. 

60-3e-72/Q 
MAZDA RX7, 1979, 
CALIFORNIA car, perfect 
condition, $2,300 or trade for 
bigger car of equal value. 
(708)872-0627. 

80-38-73 , 
1990 DODGE DYNASTY 
LE, fully loaded, excellent 
condition, 30k miles, $9,500/ 
offer (414)878-1794. 

1981 280-Z TURBO with t- 

tops, no body rust, garage 
kept, blue and silver, 
automatic, power steering, 
power brakes, only 65,000 
miles. Must selll $2,800 or best 
offer. After 6pm. (708)587- 
0055. 

8b-37-75/G 
1979 CORVETTE. Rod 
with mirrored T-tops, 55,000 
miles, excellent condition. 
(708)395-0303 after 5pm. 

flO-37.7R 




Cars 
For Sale 



1989 PORSCHE 944S2, 
1989 black, less than 20,000 
miles. Asking $23,000 
(708)265-0969. 

80-36-71 

1984 NISSAN SENTflA, 2- 
doof, • red, standard 
transmission, 35mpg, 
excellent condition, 
mechanically sound Inskte and 
out. $1,650 Must see I Make 
offer (708)249-4382. 

80-37-77 

1985 BUICK SOMERSET 
Coupe, blue, kiaded, excellent 
condition, 59.000 miles, 
$3,100 or beat (ei5)-385- 
4318. 

80-36-36' 

1982 CADILLAC DaVllla, 
good condition, loaded, 
asking $2,300/ best offer. 
(708)356-3862. 

80-37-78 

1986 CHEVROLET 
Camaro Z28, good condition, 
loaded. T-tops. Price la 
negolibie. (708)587-4808. Ask 
lorBiil. 

80-37-79 

1983 CAPRICE, 92,000 
milaa, original owner. 305 V- 
8. 4-door, am/fm stereo, air, 
no rust, clean interior, new 
brakes, tires, radiator, etc. 
$2,475/offer. (708)816-7230. 

80-37-80 
1979 PONTIAC FIREBIRD, 
automatic, new brakes, runs 
good $1,550 (708)662-2780. 

80-37-81 

1985 LaBARON GTS, vary 
good condition, many new 
parts, $3,500 or best offer 
(708)973-1701 

80-37-82 

1984 DODGE OMNI robulK 
engine and transmission, 
excellent condition, excellent 
runner. $1,500 (708)367- 
2399. 

80-37-83 

1986 NISSAN PULSAR, 
gray, 100,000 miles, 5-8peed. 
new carburetor, excellent 
condition, $2,200 (706)356- 
1693. 

80-37.84 

1989 TOYOTA COROLLA 

LE, 4-door sedan, automatic, 
over drive, power package, 
cruise, tilt, am/fm stereo 
cassette. 4-8peakers and 
more. MINT condition 
(414)877-0620 after 4pm. 

80-37-85 
1978 OLDS 98 380, $500, 
some rust, but runs good, 
(708)356-3621. 

80-37-86 
1983 CHEVY CITATION. 
43,000 original miles, exoellent 
condition, mechanic body. 
$2,500 (708)356-2725. 

80-37-87 
JEEP, 1981 CJ5, soft lop, 
some mst. $1,400. (414)656- 
0705, Mornings or 4pm -6pm. 

80-36-139 
1981 CHEVY CITATION, 
bius, 2-door, 6-cylinder, 
standard transmission, runs 
very good, $600 firm. 
(708)740-4993. 

80-36-140 
1988 ESCORT GL 
WAGON, 4-speed. 
burgandy, 33,000 miles, 
am/fm 4-speaker stereo, air, 
good condition. $2,950. 
(708)223-8639 after 6pm. 

80-36-141 
1990 FORD TEMPO-GL, 
kjw miles, automatic, air, power 
steering, power brakes, power 
locks, factory warranty, 
excellent condition. Must sell. 
Asking $6,700. Call Ralph at 
(708)390-8050 ext. 667 or 
(708)546-5809 for details. 

eo-TF-2'14 




Cars 
For Sale 



1991 CAMARO R8, fully 
loaded, $10,000. Call for 
appointment (708)223-7606 
ahef epm. 

80-37-143 
1890 COUGAR XR7, Black 
with. black leather interior, 
super charged, JBL stereo, 
aunroof, 27,000 miles, 
$12,800 or best offer. 
(708)223-9359 eves or 
{708)367-8707 days, Ask for 
Bob. 

80-37-144 
LIKE NEWIII 1987 

CHRYSLER LeBaron GTS, 
totally loaded-power 
everything, cruise, air, tape, 
blue on blue, and much morel 
87.000 highway miles, $5,200 
or best offer. (708)680-6544. 

80-36-78 
FAMILY CAR. MAKE AN 
OFFEflll 1990 Ford Tempo 
GL, low miles, automatic, air, 
power steering, power brakes, 
power locks, factory warranty, 
oxcaiient condition. Must selll 
Asking $6,700. Call Ralph at 
(708)390-8050 ext.667 or 
(708)546-5809 for details. 
an-9i/TF-20q 



ana 




CiossIc/AnUquc 
Cars 



]^k 



FORD, 1960 T-BIRD, 
nssds work. Best offer. 
(706)766-4961. 

82-37-142 

1969 CHEVY PICKUP 
Fleelsido, Original motor, 90% 
restored. $3,500 (708)740- 
1577. 

82-3inF-1S3 
MERCEDES BENZ, 190- 
SL, 1958 Roadster, 2-tops, 
excellent body and mechanics, 
$25,000 Will consider trade, 
(708)587-0560. 

82-37-166 

1970 MUSTANG 

CONVERTIBLE, restored. 
Make offer. (708)656-5542. 

82-36-1S0 
1963 CHEVROLET 

IMPALA CONVERTIBLE, 
beautiful black, automatic, 1 
owner car, $10,000. 
(708)356-7455 after 5pm. 

82-36-161 

1967 PONTIAC GRAN 
PRIX, convertible. Runs and 
looks GREATI Must Seel 
$7,500 or best offer. (708)336- 
3414 after 5pm. 

82-36-41 

Service & 
Pans 

OLDS WINDSHIELD. $S0. 

Fenders, $50. and tires, $25/ 
pair. All good condition. 
(708)546-2640. 

63.37-39 
CLASSIC QUARTER 
PANEL Sale! Mustang, 
Camaro, Nova, Chevelle, 
Cutlass, Mopars, Ponllac, 
Chevrolet, morel Truck pans, 
floor pans, doors, fenders, 
bumpers. New and California 
Rust Free I Mark's Plating and 
Supply. 217-824-6184. 

63-00-00 





Vane 




2 CAPTAINS CHAIRS lor 
Chevy Van. Brown Velour 
$65/each. (708)740-0562. 
85-33/TF-126 

1985 DODGE 

PASSENGER van, V-8, 
power steering and brakes, 
automatic, cruise, air, am/fm 
cassette, $2,400 or best offer. 
(708)680-7206. 

85-37-88 



1989 GMC STARCRAFT 

GT Van, teak wood, all power, 
leather, 5.7L, mags, dual air. 
dass IV hitch, gages, more, 
low miles, very dean, $14,500 
or be9t offer. (708)546-3967. 

85-36-84 
1979 Q20 CHEVY work 
van, 350 engine, $700 or best 
offer. (708)587-9693. 

85-36-85 

1979 HYDRA IJNIT 342 

Excavator, 73,000 lbs. 
machine, 29* digging depth, 
loyatfcks, operates and runs 
good. $18,000 value, will sell 
for $1 5,000 or trade for bobcat 
and cash. 1989 CHEVY 
ASTRO VAN CL, 39,000 mites, 
full power, air, tilt, cruise, 
am/fm cassette, black with 
gray Interior, (8) passenger 
seating, good condition, 
$9,500 or Best offer. 
(414)537-4980 or (414)539- 
3689, aher 530pm. 

85-36-149 
1988 CHEVY ASTRO VAN, 
air, cruise, S-seals, good 
condition, $5,500; 7 1/2' 
western PLOW and salt 
spreader, $1,200 combined. 
(708)587-2998 after 3pm. 

85-37-150 . 

1983 DODGE CARGO- Van, 
one ton, 360 V8. runs great, 
excellent work van. Best offer. 
Call Ralph at 

(708)546-5809 or (708)390- 
6050 exL 067. 

aS-TF-1 05, 

Trucks/ 
Trailers 

BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITY- lull or part 
time. For sale, (i) tow truck, 
fully equipped, excellent 
condition, $2,800 or best offer. 
Call anytime (708)740-2959. 

B8-37-48/G 
NISSAN, 1989 PICKUP, 
shortbed, stick, am/fm 
cassette, $4,500 (708)362- 
2466. 

86-36-e9/G 
1990 FORD RANGER XLT, 
4x4, 27,000 highway miles, all 
options, perfect condition, 
$9,600(414)654-2747. 

86-37-90 
1986 SUBURBAN, loaded, 
65,000 miles, and runs great, 
$8,500 (708)746-8128. 

86-37-91 
1970 FORD RANGER XLT. 
full size pickup, aulomatk:, VS. 
excellent condition, southern 
truck, no rust, $2,800 or best 
offer. (708)356.7455 alter 
5pm. 

86-36-86 

1968 DODGE RAIDER 

4X4, excellent condition, 

54,000 miles. $5,700 or best 

offer. (708)587-8149. 

66-3687 

1984 JEEP CHEROKEE 
4X4, air, am/fm cassette, 
rebuilt engine, new tires and 
shocks, very clean, $5,900 or 
best offer. (708)367-7686. 

86-36-88 
1983 CHEVY BLAZER, 6.2 
Liter, diesei. with 4-speed 
automatic transmission, has 
every power option available, 
towing package, new tires. 
Looks and drives great. 285 
watt stereo system. $4,200. 
(708)497-4919 Evenings or 
(708)359-7810 Ext.262 Days. 

66-36-89 
1990 SILVER CHEVY 
Silverado 1500, 350 engine, 5 
speed, 30.000 miles, running 
boards, bed liner, excellent 
condition, $12,000. 
(414)809-8340. 

86-TF-75 




Trucks/ 
Trailers 



1976 FORD PICKUP F250 

Suporcab, cracked windshield, 
mns OK. $300 or best offer. 
(708)567-3024. 

86-36-40 
PARTING OUT JEEP 
PARTSI! Misc. parts for CJ-5 
and .GJ'7's including grills, 
wheels, rims, hard top, etc. Call 
(708)740-0562. 

86-34/TF-118/G 

1990 FORD RANGER XLT, 
4 cylinder, 5 speed, air 
conditioning, anVfm cassette, 
sliding rear window, aluminum 
mag wheels, black with gray 
interior. $8,000. (708)746- 
5655. 

86-36-163 
'61 FORD F800, diesal 
cabin chassis, long wheel 
base. $4,500 or best offer. 
(708)438-7437. 

86-36-1^4 
UTILITY TRAILER. 4x6 ft., 
I.OOOib, Springs, has tJit bed, ^' 
$375.00. Call(41 4)657-1 238 
after 3pm 




MolorcvclesKMS: 



MOTORCYCLE 1992 CBR 

600 F-2 with Vance and Hines 
radng pipe, must sell for 
$4,200. Call Alex at (708)740- 
7412. 

88-36-93 
1989 YAMAHA FZR60O, 
black, low miles, indudes 
helmet and cover. $3,200. 
(708)356-8895. 

88-36-94 
HONDA XL 250 ENDURO 
1,100 miles. Excellent 
condition. $1,100 Best offer. ' 
Call after 5pm (414)857-2983. 
Ra-30/TF-177 

1986 HONDA SHADOW 
700. cc, V-twin, 5.000 miles, 
windshield, saddle bags, 
exoellent condition, $2,500 or 
best offer. Call (414)889-8340. 

88-35/TF-120/G 
HONDA ELITE ISOcc 
scooter, excellent condition, 
2,900 miles. $850. Call 
(708)244-2162. 

88-36-165 
1979 HONDA GOLOWING 
lOOOcc, Trunk and 

saddlebags, stereo and 
speakers, $800. After 5pm 
(708)356-9662. 

86-36-166 
HARLEY DAVIDSON, 1949 
Pan, fresh motor, 
transmission. Must seel 
$5,300. (414)654-4497. 

88-36-g2 
MOTORCYCLE, 1984 
YAMAHA 700, V-Twln. red, 
$2,000. (708)526.2076. 

88-37-151 
HARLEY- 1988 FXR3 LOW 
rider, black, backrest, luggage 
rack. Insulated cover, 6.000 
miles, excellent condition. 
$6,000 (708)356-3867. 
68-37-92 



Wanted 
To Buv 




CAR WANTED: Wihtad 

Toyota/Honda/Mazda or other 
reliable running car. 1981- 
1986. reasonable for a 
student (708)483-2653. 
89-36-47 
$$INSTANT CASH$$ 
For your car or truck. 
Running or not I pay more. 
Will pickup, (708)726-1309. 

89-TF/39-44 
JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS. 
Reasonable priced. Running 
or not. Free removallll 
(708)838-0173. 

89-TF/39-45 




Where To Worship 




ghaii\^ofLake§ 

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH 



SUNOAY W^ORSHIP 

8:15 & 10:45 AM 
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM 

EVENING SERVICE 

No Evening Service 

for Suncfey, 
September 6. 1 992 



708-838-0103 OR 0104 
CHURCH LOCATED AT 23201 W. GRASS LAKE RD. 





ictory 

hristian 

entre 



Presents 

The Ministry of Kevin Leal 

SUNDAy, SEPTEMBER 6, 10 A-M. 

at Lagendork Park District 
235 Lions Drive 
n Barrington 

L For information c^ (708) 540-9600^ 

^"^ i_ ^^ Ml" 



REFORMED? 

Interested in BibJe Study? 

Currently we're studying Galatians 

Join us at 6:00 p.m. 

Meeting at the 

Shepherd of the Lakes Church 

in Grayslal<e 

a half mile west of Rt, 83 

on Washington 

Please call 362-0999 for 
further information. 



Friday, S«pt«mb«r 4, 1992 



Lakeland N«wspapore 35 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



\ 



1 



m '. 



I'i; 



Tree represents life for 7 cancer patients 



by HEATHER McDONALD 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Seven returning hospital 
patients shoveled dirt in 
unison when they planted a 
flowering crab apple tree to 
symbolize their 5-year 
victory over cancer. 

The tears that accom- 
panied the hugs between 
volunteers and staff 
members, and the returning 
cancer patients captured the 
essence of life better than 
the tree ever could. 

"Oh gosh, it's so good to 
see you again/ Polly 
Freiday, a 4-year volunteer 
with American International 
Hospital, cried as she 
hugged Mona Moore of 
Indiana. 

It was a time for doctors 
to express not only their 
congratuladons to their pa- 
tients, but also thanks for 
being an inspiration to 
them. 
"We have the pain you do 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

LEGAL NOTICE 

FOR BIPS 

The Round l_ake com- 
munity Unit School District 
#116 will be accepting 
seated bids for the follow- 
ing: 
A Rve Year Proposal for 
Maintenance of IHVAC and 

Refrigeration Units 
Combined with an Energy 
Management System 
The Board of Education 
reserves the right to waive 
any technicalities or irregu- 
larities and to reject any 
and all bids. 

Specifications may be 
obtained from George A. 
Bumham, Director of Busi- 
ness Affairs at the Admin- 
istrative Office, 316 South 
Rosedale Court, Round 
Uks.lL 60073. 

Sealed bids must be re- 
ceived on or t>efore 2:30pm 
on Monday, September 14, 
1992, at the above 
address. 

O992A-0t8-GEN 
September 4, 1992 



BUT IT 
S£LLIT 

FIND IT 

Lakeland Classified 

(708) 223-81 61 



with the biopsy and the 
sticks, and we're sick with 
you during chemo," said R. 
Michael Williams, M.D., 
senior medical director fcH* 
Cancer Treatment Centers 
of America. "But we also 
share the enjoyment with 
you." 

"Your accomplishments 
inspire me and the staff," 
Stephen Weinstein, 
American International 
Hospital's president and 
CEO» said. "You remind us 
of our mission — to help 
people conquer cancer. It is 
your guidance that helps us 
to eventually find cures for 
other cancers. 

"You, die patients, say it 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ELA ROAD DISTRICT 

Notice is hereby given 
that sealed proposals will 
be receh/ed at the office of 
the Ela Township Cleri< at 
95 East Main Street, Lake 
Zurich, Illinois 60047 until 
10:00 o'clock, A.M., on 
SEPTEMBER 14, 1992 for 
furnishing of the following 
material: 

BITUMINOUS CON- 
CRETE SURFACE 
COURSE. MIX C, CLASS I, 
TYPE2 827TOI^IS 

Proposals shall be 
made on forms furnished by 
the Highway Commissioner, 
and shall be addressed in a 
sealed envelope to Jose 
Martinez, Ela Road District 
Highway Commissioner, 95 
East Main Street, Lake 
Zurich, Illinois 60047 and 
shall be mari^ "MATERIAL 
PROPOSAL - Letting of 
SEP. 14, 1992, Ela Road 
District." Further information 
regarding this letting may 
be obtained by contacting 
the Highway Commissioner 
at 708-438-2371 . The Road 
District in accordance with 
the laws of the State of Illi- 
nois hereby notifies all bid- 
ders that it will affirmatively 
insure that the contract en~ 
tered into pursuant to this 
advertisement will be 
awarded to the lowest re- 
sponsible bidder without 
discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or na- 
tional origin. 
By order of Jose Martinez 
Ela Road District 

Highway Commissioner 

0992A-014-GEN 

September 4, 1992 




HOST 
FAmUES 
KEEDED 




ALBERTO, 17 YEARS MONICA, 16 YEARS 

lamiiics to host international exchange 
students arc needed now! Choose your 
high school exchange student from among 
several boys and girls, 15-18 years old 
who are eager to share their culture with 
you as they learn about yours. 

Enrich your family and make a lifelong 
friend of a young overseas visitor. 

Call now to select your own exchange 
student (Single parents and couples 
without children at home can qualify.) 

CaU E. DeLain (708) 872-8602 
Jodi at 1-800-888-9040 (Toll Free] 

Own 
Spending 
Mc 



Fully <=5 

Insilred! ^ 




[oneyl 



SPANISH HERITAGE 

SPANtSHHERTTAGE IS A PUBLIC BENEPn', NGN- PROFIT ORGANIZATION 



better than anything does." 

Although the doctors 
thank the patients, it is still 
the doctors that the patients 
feel have done the |Work 
with them. 

"I was toW I'd Uve 20-30 
days," said Ewald 
Ehresmann, a former patient 
from Manly, Iowa. "I came 
here, and look at me. It's 
been six years ago. I've sent 
16 people here myself." 

As Ehresmann closed his 
speech by thanking the 
doctors, staff and other for- 
mer patients for their 
support, the crowd erupted 
with applause, and tears. 

Tears of life, that 
nourished the patients 
through their struggles, and 
will nourish the 31 trees 
planted in recognition of 
their victtxy. 




From left, Blanche Taylor of Detroit. Mich., Barb HIadek of Hammond, Ind.. 
Ewald Ehresmann of Manly, Ohio, Sue Anne Walters of Springboro. Ohio, Ruth 
Taylor of Johnson, Tenn., Mona Moore of Lawrenceburg, Ind., and Frank 
Sadowski of Twin Lakes, Wis. plant a f towering crab apple tree to represent their 
5-year victory over cancer. — Photo by Heather McE^onakJ 



Wedding s 



Lake County maniage 
licenses from August 18 
through August 21. 

Aug. 18: Raymy Richard 
Brown and Sandra Jeanne Wood, 
Grayslakc, Scan Damicn DUlard, 
Bolsc-Idaho and Heather Leigh 
Phillips, Fox Lake, Jose Luis 
Gonzalez and Lelicia Pasillas, 
Mundclcin, Robert Dennis 
Hackcloer, Paddock Lake and 
Catherine Ann Haley, Anlioch, 
Brian Timolhy Hansen and Sally 
Donella Ostin, Mundclcin, 

Patrick Michael Kobylanski, 
and Lompoc, California and 
Jcnncltc Lynn Caldwell, 
Wadsworth, Curtis Jon Lcafblad, 
Gumcc and Donna Marie Eifcring, 
Wadsworth, Michael James 
PaolcUa and Rita Jean Moran, 



Lake Zurich. 

Aug. 19: Matthew Todd 
Antczak, Lambard and Doricc 
Carol Lalogancs, Barrington, 
Elliott Lee Hanna, Wukcgan and 
Schronc Lavel Johnson, North 
Chicago. 

Aug. 20: Paul Theodore 
Juarez and Suzanne Elizabeth 
Gilson, Libcrtyvillc, Timolhy 
Todd Lambert, Winfield, IL and 
Christina Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, 
Libertyville, Michael Lee 
Pinglcion, McHcnry and Tomina 
Elaine Abrahamsen, Round Lake, 
Tcmpel Jean Smith, Jr, and Gail 
Cynthia Plcchally, Wadsworth. 

Aug. 21: Kenneth George 
Baxter, Fox Lake and Ruth EUcn 
Talbot, Highland Park, Jeffcry 
William Briggs, Gumcc and Mary 
Ann DcZcttcr, Lindcnhurst, 



Joseph Don Butiel, Eua Claire, 
WI and Kimberly Marie Brocckcr, 
Libertyville, Christopher Allen 
Dickson and Helen 
Kosmopoulos, Fox Lake, Jeffrey 
Kenneth Fanning, Zion and 
Michelle Lee Vcmc, Gumce, Roy 
Alvin Ford, Zion and Cheryl 
Lynn Korstanje, Vemon Hills, 

Salvador Gonzalez and Maria 
Virginia Rivera, Grayslakc, 
Thomas Arthur Gottslcin, Round 
Lake Park and Mary Louise 
Tarpcy, Long Grove, Dan Graig 
Haylcy and Dcbra Sue Kennedy, 
Lake Villa, Steven Joseph 
Hofflandcr and Traci Lcc Rowan, 
Round Lake Park, James Bernard 
Johnson and Amy Elizabeth 
Graham, Lake Zurich, 

Michael Christopher 
Kosmach, Wauconda and Ann 



Louise Puctz, Arlington Heights, 
Dale Scott Lachman, Vernon 
Hills and Kimberly Lyim Kayser, 
Linconshire, Joseph Adam 
Lalanda and Winnie Anne Rogge, 
Inglcside, John Charles Meyers 
and Dawn Marie Pote'racki, 
Gumee, Terry Lcc Mithcell, 
Inglcside and Christine Jean 
Skowron, Mundclcin, 

John Albert Patterson, Jr., 
North Chicago and Deborah Anita 
Ware, Waukegan, Paul Joseph 
Puglicsc and Caroline Margaret 
Cosby, Gumee, Robert Edward 
Riley, Waukegan and Jennifer Sue 
Atkinson, Lake Villa, William 
Henry Rogers, Jr. and Barbara 
Jean Houscr, Grayslake, 
Williaam Michael Scoggin, and 
Yolanda CastcUanos, North 
Chicago. 




36 Lcikofcind Itowspapors 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



i^^;;t^i;'t :r/: '.— ,,:, r .y^^^^t.^ 



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Vikes' Quist makes most from a chance meeting 



■"4 



^-■■.7J 



stvl ■•'■^5 






by STEVE PETERSON 
LakcUod Newspapers 

It could have been any one of hundreds 
of afternoons at Wairen Township Center. 

There was Gumec resident Wes Quist, 
throwing the football around with some 
of his buddies. Injuries had previously cut 
his high school caxeer at Warren Town- 
ship High School short If he would play 
football again more seriously than the fiin 
at the township center may have been 
thoughts. Directing a 49-0 win over the 
Chicago Thunder was probably not in the 
top 10. 

"I was playing football with my friends 
at Warren Township Center one day and 
Rick Starosta (Vikings player and part 
owner) asked rhe to come out for the 
team," Quist recalled. 

For the last three years, Quist has ful- 
filled the role of backup QB, but this 
Saturday night, he was called on to start 
and the eight-of-U four touchdown pass- 
ing was the end result The 49-0 win over 
the Thunder improved the Vikings to 2-1 
before a key Sept 6 game at Milwaukee. 

Starting quarterback Walter Tesch has 
apparently quit the team. The week be- 
fore, he had a rough sevcn-for-25 passing 
in a 6-0 loss to St Louis. 

"I have no idea; he has never talked to 
me," head coach Russ Kraly said of 
Tesch's leaving. 

"Sam Tola was the starter the first year 
and the last two years was with Walter. 
This year I hope it is my year. 



"I found out about it (Tesch's quiting) 
after practice Tuesday night Coach (Russ 
Kraly) told me to practice hard on Thurs- 
day. It (the lopsided win) is a Uttle easier. 



but the way Coach Horn (Bob, offensive 
coordinator) really pushed us hard in 
practice to get our timing down, get to- 
gether with the plays. Tlie coaches said. 




Lake County Vikings' Chris Travajian eludes two Chicago Thunder tacklers en 
route to a six-yard touchdown run. Travajian, a Warren Township High School 
graduate, was one of seven Vikings to score points against Thunder in 49-0 win. 
Vikings are at Milwaukee for Sept. 6 game. — Photo by Eugene Gabry. 



'you have been a backup, this is your 
chance'," Quist said. 

"He just needs some experience with the 
first string unit. It's something to build 
on, positive," Kraly said. 

The running game got things going less 
than 10 seconds into the contest Bob 
Lochmann scored on a 17-yard run. Marie 
Van Guilden then netted a safety for an 8- 
lead. Quist found Starosta open for one 
of two touchdown passes for three yards. 

He hit Brian Landsverk on a 17-yard pass 
in the third quarter for a 35-0 lead. A 26- 
yard pass to Stu Stehl and a oneyard TD 
run by Garrett Horn completed the on- 
slaught 

"Walter has a power arm. I can't com- 
pare with that I have to lead the re- 
ceivers. Walter can rely on his arm 
strength.' I have to rely cm more poise," 
Quist said. 

In his furst Vikings year, Toia showed 
Quist the ropes, with special trips from 
his Chicago job. "I had never played at 
this level. I felt I was behind. That is 
whay Rick and Sam spent so much time 
with me," Quist, 23, said. 

"At first I was a little upset We talk a 
lot on the phone about what might woric 
here, what might work there. As a backup 
quarterback my eye on the defense to try 
and help him as much as I could," he 
said. 

Quist was called on to start one game 
last year against Milwaukee when Tesch 
had injured ribs. 



Barczak answers call to take over at Grant 




Mark Barczak 

by GREG MILLER 

Lakeland Newspapers 

A conversation with Mark Barczak, 
Grant's new head football coach: 

"So, Grant was 0-9 last year, right?" 

"What?" 



**I said, Grant didn't win any games 
last year." 

"Blast deer? No, I'm my more of a 
fisherman myself." 

"I mean, will it be hard to shake this 
recent losing tradition?" 

"Refusing extradidon? No, none of our 
players are in trouble." 

"No, Mark, will it be difficult to in- 
still a winning altitude?" 

"Grinning with gratitude? Hey, I don't 
have time for this nonsense — I've got a 
team to run." 

It wasn't quite as bad as that but Bar- 
czak, a usually fit-as-a-fiddle 36-ycar-oId, 
has been batUing a severe ear infection 
since preseason practice started Aug. 17. 
It's been bad enough that he's had to wear 
a hearing aid. 

"It's improving, but the doctor said it 
might run up to six weeks," Barczak said 
of the affliction. "It's been torture — it's 
embarrassing." 

Barczak did hear the call to take over as 
the Bulldogs' head man after serving as an 
assistant for 15 years. As Barczak is no 
stranger around Fox Lake, he's also well- 



acquainted with winning. His sophomore 
team compiled a 6-2-1 record and was the 
unofficial Northwest Subuiban Conference 
champ in 1991. 

Barczak grew up on Chicago's South- 
side and played his prep ball at Brother 
Rice High School. 

From that perspective. Lake County 
seemed like another country, 

"We thought going up here was like 
going to Canada," Barczak said. 

When it was time to go to college, 
however, Barczak went way north to 
Lakeland College in Sheboygan. Wis., 
where he owned the starting nose guard 
position for four years. He was team c^ 
tain during his senior year. 

"I couldn't have been that good — 
(Mike) DiUca never gave me a buzz," Bar- 
czakjoked. . 

Three of Barczak's buddies at Lakeland 
College — Mike Simmons, Bobby 
HarriscMi and Mike Roberts — were from 
this area. When Barczak graduated in 
1978, Sunmons told him about an open- 



ing at Grant Barczak's been right at home 
ever since. He teaches health and social 
studies. 

Barczak has just three retunung starters 
and a junior-heavy roster to work with, 
but he's getting some able assistance from 
his staff. Varsity assistants Fred LofTredo 
and Bob Koltz both have been head 
coaches themselves. 

"It's been overwhelming to get us 
ready to play," Barczak said. "Those two 
gentlemen have been holding my hand. 
It's nice to have their expertise to ^1 back 
on. There's a wealth of knowledge here." 

The rest of Barczak's staff includes 
Frank Cittadino, Brian Kibitlewski, Rich 
Becmer, Ken Gardner and Kurt Rous. The 
last four all played at Grant at one time or 
another. 

Barczak wants his players to be hard- 
nosed but not hard-headed. 

"I want our kids to be hitters, but I 
want them to be gentlemen. They can 
save the fmger-pointing and taunting for 
their pro-wrestling careers." 



Warren fans to hear new 
voice on the P.A. system 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

It is changing-of-the-guard time when it 
comes to the public address system at 
Warren Township High School. 

For decades, Wanen fans heard golf coach 
Fred Kattner introduce starting lineups, 
the cheerleaders, and of course the 50-50 
Booster Qub drawing. 

"Now I know what it felt like when they 
replaced (basketball coach) John Wooden 
at UCLA," Joe Stephenitch said. "I've 
been a public address announcer for Little 
League basebal and have talked with a lot 
of groups, but football will be different" 

Stephenitch, who is the school's Future 
Business Leaders of America advisor, was 
recommended by Kattner. 

The new voice of the Blue Devils will be 

Friday, September 4, 1992 



listening closely to area announcers at 
games the first two weeks of the season. 
Warren's home opener is Sept 18 against 
North Chicago. 

Also at Warren, Mike Kunkle is 
back to his athletic director role only this 
fall at Warren Township High School. 

The long-time varsity head coach at 
Warren returned to the field to assist Reg- 
gie Hughes the last two seasons. Tony 
Flippo will coach defensive ends and 
linebackers. Other assignments at the state 
quarterfinalisL Randy Cashmote will han- 
dle wide receivers and tight ends; Dave 
Sibley line and Hughes quarterbacks and 
running backs. 

Perhaps due to the success of the 10-2 
team last year, growth in the disUict or 
whatever, Warren is up to 175 players this 
year. 




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Lakoland Newspapors 37 




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Lakeland's SPORTS 



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Struggles back as spiker, 
Serdar to attend Louis U. 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A familiar face to DcPaul 
sports fans took the court 
when the Blue Demons 
opened the 1992 season 
this week. 

Ashley Struggles is 
expanding her athletic ca- 
reer with the Blue Demons 
10 include volleyball this 
fall. Struggles is entering 
her senior year and earned a 
Softball scholarship to the 
Chicago schooL 

Meanwhile, a former 
North Suburban Conference 
foe, Kate Serdar, is attend- 
ing National Louis 
University in Evansion this 
fall after competing in 
Softball last year at the 
College of Lake County. 

"Ashley has been away 
from volleyball for a cou- 
ple of years, but she will 
catch up in a few weeks. 
She is dedicated and she has 
quickness," DcPaul coach 



Anna Marie Marassae said. 

Struggles, who set the 
DePaul Softball record for 
stolen bases this spring, is 
coming into a program 
which was 32-7 last year, 
the best fmish for DcPaul 
volleyball. 

"She has a pretty good 
spin serve." Marassa said. 

The Blue Demons opened 
the season with a match 
against Colorado State 
Wednesday before compet- 
ing in this weekend's Col- 
orado Invitational. 

Struggles' Softball talents 
could carry over to volley- 
ball. '^She has a great flrst 
Step. On defense, seeing the 
ball is very important." she 
said. 

Serdar will also be joining 
a team coming off a banner 
year. National Louis, a 
NAIA school, was 30-7 in 
Softball last year. 

Serdar learned of National 
Louis from another pitcher 



on last year's CLC team. 
Lynette Kowalke. 
Kowalke, a . Mundelein 
graduate, will be pitching 
for the Evanston-based 
schooL 

Serdar informed the team 
of her move to National 
Louis before a team 
organizational meeting last 
week. "It was hard because 
I made a lot of friends 
there," the former Warren 
standout said. 

Serdar is also looking to 
play basketball. "I really 
want to play basketball. I 
found out their point guard 
is not coming back," she 
said. 

Serdar spent a semester at 
Northern Michigan 
University before coming 
to CLC this spring. She 
pitched and played short- 
stop for CLC. At National- 
Louis, she will only play 
inHeld. 



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Sunday, Sept. 6 9 PM to 1 AM 

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Dlssioii'srjaciiig squad Bet 
for pro series title effort 



A Libertyville area 
resident is guiding a racing 
team gunning for the title 
in the Oldsmobile Pro 
Series. 

Ove Olsson owns Olsson 
Engineering, whose driver, 
Tony Ave, is three points 
off the lead. The team 
finished second in a race in 
Three Rivers, Ontario, 
Canada, and will be 
returning to Elkhart Lakes, 
Wis. for a Sept. 12-13 
"Chicken" regional 
cookouL 

"It's the competition," 
Olsson said of what keeps 
him going after 25 years in 
auto racing. 

Olsson has worked with 
NFL great Walter Payton, 
John, Jeff and Michael 



Andretti and Freddy 
Kottolinsky. 

"He's a good kid. His 
father used to race against 
us," Olsson said of Ave. 
"He hates to fmish second." 

Ave is a Hurley, Wis. 
resident 

The Olsson team has been 
in some close races this 

Keaskowski 

John Keaskowaski has 
signed a national letter of 
intent to play soccer and 
wrestle at Lindcwood 
College. 

Keaskowski graduated 
from Round Lake Senior 
High in June, hi soccer, he 
was named all-Northwest 
Suburban Conference. His 



year, such as the one it 
finished second at Watkins 
Glenn, New York. The cars 
average 100 to 105 MPH. 
The team won the Mid- 
Ohio Sportscar course and 
the New Orleans Grand 
Prix. The team set a new 
pro series track record 
during the race. 

signs Jetter 

wrestling accolades include 
conference, regional and 
qualified for sectionals 
twice. 

Keaskowski is the son of 
Robert and Mary Janet 
Keaskowski of Round Lake 
Park and plans to pursue a 
career in engineering at the 
St Charles. Mo. school. 



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,' *i 



38 LakoFand Nowspopors 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



t * 



i»->«»r^»j«^M!»l*flV(M)'-*.'ji-.^"" ■' ■ ' *^>4"T^t "-t 



Lakeland's SPORTS 



oulis, Kratz, Morrison gain Speedway victories 



It 

flS 

rs 

a. 

d- 
id 
id 
w 
rd 



r 

Ic 
id 
Is 

of 

et 

Ice 

a 

tie 



Dave Moulis» of 

f-^siiohnsburg, went wire to 

mo to take his fourth 25- 

ip winged sprint car feature 

^f the season on Aug. 29 

highlight a 21-race event 

program on Ugly Duckling 

;ar & Truck 

lental/McHenry Auto Sales 

light at Toft Auto 

lacing's Wilmot Speedway 

l)f Wihnot, Wis. 

Wheatland's Joe 

iraumcnz proved patience 

}ays off as he scored his 

feccond 20-lap modified 

lain win of the year. 

)cnnis Kratz of Antioch 

;onlinucd to take giant 

jlcps toward his first-ever 

rack championship as he 

;ored his tenth feature win 

ibf the season in the 20- 

lapper fo sportsman. 

Rubicon's Romy Baus won 

|his fourth mini-sprint main 

fas he closes in on his first 

[track championship in the 

Sinaugural season for the 

[motorcycle-powered winged 

[machines at Wilmot. Roy 

Morrison of Antioch took 

[the checkered flag in the 

imini-modified main. 

Moulis put his Fox 
.ake Harbor/McHenry 
IWclding/Auto Connection/ 
: fkjulf Coast Graphics 
IjMaxim into the lead from 
;:i|his outside row one starling 
■berth. Mike Frost began to 
challenge Moulis as the pair 
worked lapped traffic on lap 
15. The two had pulled 
Wiwing to wing on lap 16 just 
before two cars tangled 
coming out of turn four 
right in front of the front- 
running duo. Both 
narrowly missed the 
spinning cars which resulted 
in the only caution. 
Moulis pulled away on the 
restart with the clear race 
^^ track ahead and went on to 




his first feature win since 
July 3 at Wilmot. Frost, 
Etennis Spitz, Joe Roe and 
Al Schmidt completed the 
top five. 

"I saw Mike's front end 
just before the wreck," 
admitted Moulis. "It was 
just as close for me getting 
involved in it as it was for 
Mike. I'm especially happy 
about the win since my 
dad, Joe Moulis, is in the 
stands for the first time 
since he had open-heart 
surgery (July 3). This 
makes the win even more 
special," 

Kratz started up front by 
luck of the pole heal pill 
and ihe pointleader wasted 
little time putting his Don 
Hansen Alignment & 
Service/Jolict Valves/ 
Sinclair Racing Engine 
Assembly Thundcrbird into 
the lead. The only caution 
came on lap four for a spin. 
Kratz built up a sizable 
lead with Scott Kuxhouse, 
who had started last in the 
20-car field by having won 
the feature the week prior, 
methodically working his 
way through the crowd. 
Kuxhouse took ninnerup 
spot with 3 laps to go, but 
Kratz was too far gone. 
Kuxhouse, Jay Crichton, 
Larry Surleta and Jukka 
Myllymaki rounded out the 
top five. "I have to dedicate 
this win to E)cbbic Zillmer 
who works the pit gale," 
said Kratz. "She and I had a 
Utile disa^ccment earlier in 
the year, but now she's 
probably my biggest fan. 
The car ran super. Mr. 
Sinclair worked on the 
motor this week and we 
never got above 180 
degrees, whereas last week 
we had to pull out because 
it was running loo hot" 

The mini-modified 



main saw several laps of 
three- and four-wide 
competition in their non- 
stop event which also 
posted a track record 
3:24,34 for the 10-laps, 
Hank Hovorka led the fursl 
lap, breaking out of a four- 
wide pack. On the second 
lap, Roy Morrison put his 
Antioch Auto Center 
machine in front down the 
frontstrelch as he broke out 
of a three-wide battle with 
Hovorka and Glen Vemezze. 
R. Morrison went on to his 
second feature win of the 
season. Vernezze, Jim 
Morrison, Hovorka and 
Hcrmie Schullz completed 



the top five. "This is a big 
race track," said Roy 
Morrison in response to a 
question about what these 
go-kart like machines were 
doing going four-wide. 

Wilmot Speedway will 
host a double-header of 
Labor Day holiday weekend 
action at Wisconsin's Clay 
Center of Speed. 

On Saturday, Sept. 5, 
will be sprints and 
sportsman along with the 
Old Style Non-Winged 
Modified Wisconsin 
Challenge. On Sunday, 
Sept. 6 with sprints and 
sportsman plus the Old 
Style Winged Modified 



Wisconsin Challenge and 
the 10-car. 10-lap J&L Oil 
Sprint Shootout 

Invitational. 

Grandstands open each 
night at 5 p.m. with time 
trials at 6:15 p.m. and the 
first race scheduled at 6:45 
p.m. 

The annual Wilmot 
Speedway Model Car 
Contest was held with 20 
entries. 

In the senior division, 
Doug Drews of Sheboygan 
was first with three super- 
modified models, Ron 
Shepherd of Kenosha 
second with a Richard Petty 
Fan Appreciation Diorama 



and honorable mention 
Dave Johnson of Sussex 
third with a Sammy 
Swindell Diorama and 
honorable mention John 
Strycmarske for his sprint 
car slot cars. In the junior 
division, Robert Hartnell of 
Kenosha, 17-years old, took 
first for his five month 
project, Guy Fobrook 
number five sprinter, Rob 
Matthews of Wadsworth, 
second with his 1953 Street 
Rod, Joshua Davidson of 
Union Grove third with his 
Zrl Corvette and honorable 
mention to five year old 
Kenneth Johnson, Jr. for 
his wedge modified. 



i Golfer gains an ace 
at Kenwood C.C. 



A Grayslake golfer netted 
a hole-in-one while another 
shared top honors in a 
mixed couples event at 
Renwood Country Club. 

Zvi Polster of Grayslake 
netted the ace Aug. 22 on 
the par three No. 10 hole. 
He used a nine iron. 

Grayslake resident Jill 
Koch, meanwhile and her 
partner, Mike Hahn of 



Round Lake Beach, were 
low net finishers in a 
mixed couples tourney with 
a 68. 

Joy Cardin of Round 

Lake and Lee Martinek of 
Round Lake Beach were 
low gross with an 84. 

Renwood will host a 
Friends of Renwood 
Scramble on Sept. 27. 



Haveco wins title 



w 

':';(< 



Haveco downed Nultics in 
two games to claim the first 
indoor sand volleyball title 
at Oakwood Raquet & 
Health Club. 

Haveco downed Nutties 
15-8, 15-6. Winning team 
members are: Justin 
Bavosky, Jose Rivera and 
Jose Rivera, Jr. 

Nullies team members arc: 
Jim Schcttino, Scott 
Brueswitz and Chip Speck. 

In the semis, Haveco 
downed In Side-Out 11-4, 
11-9. Nultics lost the first 
game to Lakeland Auto 11- 



7 but won two 11-2 scores. 

The club is accepting reg- 
istration fort the fall indoor 
and outdoor volleyball 
leagues. Oakwood is located 
at 351 Oakwood Avenue in 
Waukegan. Leagues are of- 
fered for men, women, coed 
and high school students. 
Teams can register for 
competitive and recreational 
levels. Entry fees vary de- 
pending on the type of 
league. Most team fees start 
at $120. 

For more information, call 
Kalhy at (708) 336-7444. 



■■>i 



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Sept 3 OHIce of Glynls VashI, MD 

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Thursday Park City 

SepLIO Office of Glynis VashI, MD 

3-7 p.m. 401 S. Greenleaf 



Thursday Park City 

Sept 17 Office of Giynis VashI, MD 

3 - 7 p.m. 401 S. Greenleaf 



Friday Antioch 

Sept 1 8 North Point Medical Center | 

9 a.m. - 3 p.m.800 N. Main St. 



Thursday Park City 

Sept 24 Office of Glynls VashI, MD 

3-7 p.m. 401 S. Greenleaf 



Saturday Rolling Meadows 
Sept 26 Shopping Center 

noon - 6 p.m. 3262 KIrchoff Road 



visa, MasterCard, Discovers American Express] 
credit cards accepted. 

Walk-In appointments welcomel 



-^ The 

CTCA 

mobile 

mammogram 

unit will visit 

the following 

locations in 

your 
community. 



Make an 
Appointment 



Toda\ ■. 



8982 



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age 35 and older. Check with 
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Please remember to bring your 
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Doctore who care. Please call 708.872.8982. 



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2020 N. LEWIS 
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Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 39 



V-"A«r-ifc" 



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•RegistGred Agent for 

Tattoo-A-Pel 



ifllHINa INC. 

"Where we train you 

v/ . ^Acclaimed by: 

Vetennartans for humans instruclion and 
4. WE OFFER -» 

All our dasses are limied in sizo 

fof grealer atleniion and help witti exefdses, 

Stop In or call for Class 

Schedule 

(70BI 566-1960 
OBEDIENCE 

CONFORMflTION 
AGILTY 



to train your dog" 

attention 

•Conformalion- 

Beglnners & Advanced 
•Compeiition Classes 
•Retail Products 
'Hall Available for Rent 

(Individual and Group) 
•Counseling 




TV. VCR, Microwave 

Oven Repair. Antenna/Video Instal., 

SateUite Dish Install, and Maint. 

ADVANCED ELECTRONICS SERVICE^ INC 

1 109 Washington St. Waukegan. IL 

(708) 244-1330 




Friday, September 4, 1992 



(»/*-.' I ..' ,' » I I 




>-^^: 



• .1 



To Plas0^Ko»r 
MH&BCall 




^^ -./r.4^^,..... 



C.W. LANDSCAPE CO. INC. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS 4 CONTRACTORS 
Strving Laks- County Sin^i 1960 



•Computer Design 

• Fiagstono Patios 

• Stone Walls 
•Texture Gardens 



' Seeding 
' Sodding 
• Planting 
> Grading 




1 



|ty Woii< at Reasonable Rates 
|22 3^0346 or 1-800-371-0346 

'NEFF KENNELS I 

Boaniing for your 
Dog or Cat 
In a friendly, 

caring 
environment 

Jean Van Patton 
John and 
--»*' — Janny Adams 

ring and .peclal „^. 395-0554 
fjces available * ' 



i (708)623-7334 i 



f^^ TROPP 

Fresh cut Flowers 

$3.00 a Bunch. 

Potted plants of all kinds. 

Perennial plant 

3" pots9S0ea. 

3 Miles North of I/)ng Grove, 

1/2 Mile Nort.li of 

Route 22 on 

Old McHenry Road. 




BASEBALL CAPS! 

Polyester, Mesh Back 

Light or Dark Fronts 

$2.49 each! 

144 or more with imprint. 



Call ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 438-7488 



Our Work Speaks For lleelf 





^^' National GuUd of 
ProfesBional Paper Hanging 

(708) 395-8428 



ROSS SHEA 
PLUMBING 



Quality Plumbing at Reatonable Ratei 
IL Plumber Lie. #058-131327 

Mention Tills Ad lor C^ 
*1(r* Off A Service Callir^ 

(708)587-3091 



IVant to Buy Antiques 
A Collectors Market 

, In Business 20 years 

Buying old picture frames, china, cut glass, 

pottery, sterling, silver, silverplate, jewelry, 

fountian pens, collectables & furniture. 

A Collector's Market 

Free Appraisals on Thurs. 

Bring Items in (or my offer or call Carol 

(708) 223-4944 or (708) 223-6483 

Open Wed-Sat 11-4:30 

299 Belvidere. Grayslake 

(1 mile west of 83 ori 1 20) 

Consignment Estate Sales 




MAIDS 
ON TIME 

Old Fashioned 

Cleaning 

with Modem Maids 

10% OSS 

On New Customers 

• Top Quality • Our Supplies 

Call for Free Estimate 

708-540-7754 

Insured & Bonded 




'^.'fi.W.Sji. 



SMITH 

Spray-Brush & Roll 



^ WATERSEAL 
IfciNT - STAIN 



'.. ling, Ifim, wood, dfywall block, 
slucco. concrolo 
.1 ■ jve Ihe eipoficnco and tho equrpmenl 
1o do the jot) rrghl 
■OG Btimles Reasonable Rotes 

703) 244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 




',i^p^ 



NU-COLOR CABINETS 

AND 

COUNTER TOPS 

Countertop Replacements ' 

Hundreds of 
Colors to Choose from 

We will measure, 
build & installl 

(708) 587-059S 




KITCHENS, BATHS 
DOOR & WINDOW 

REPLACEMENTS 

SKYLIGHTS. DECKS 

SMALL JOBS A 

SPECIALTY 

Free Estimates 
f7nB\438-7908 



CREDIT PROBLEMS? 

Now you have a 

Second Chance 

Regardless of your past history 
Refused Credit? 
First Time? 
Military? 




Your Financial Future begins 
the day you establish credit. 

(708) 564-4473 

Agant oT Now Era Bank. FDIC 






HOME 

REMODELING & 

IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 



'ii 



ISCHULT 



Servicing Southeastern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois 




- Fully Insured 
' Licensed - 



Aluminum Seamless Gutters 
Decks - Installed & Treated 



rRKKFSriM.VlES 



|l-800-851-JACK(5225) 



Jack Schultz 



M14-843-2448 




I CUSTOM HOMES 

Affordable 

3 Bedroonn - Complete 

RAISED RANCH/SUPER INSULATED 

«nty-4 •69.000 ^ MQHTitW 
DOWN ^^^Ay^^i^T^^!^ $439.00 
$20,000.00 C70»> 6ea-^07a +7ax & Interest 
Just over Wise, line - Near Silver Lake 



m 



iVcIl SERVICE 

All makes and models 

PRO VCR Repair 
C708) 587-4550 

j Special Offer* 
_^ VCR Cleaning and I 
Inspection $18.95 
FREE pick up and delivery. 
Unit disconnected and reinstalled 

within 20 mile radius. 

MOST REPAinS UNDER $50.00 

Nomina! charge after 20 miles. 




EXPERT TREE CUTTINU 

Removal & Trimming 

40 Years Experience 

Insured 

BOBS TREE SERVICE 

(708) 662-9072 

40 YEARS Of Saving You Money - Mrs Why I'm Broke And Still Working!! 





GINO'S 
DECORATINO 

Interior & Exief lor 

Small Repairs 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

Fully Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

Ckiarantee 

C708} 516-XI07 



DAVIDS REMODELING 

Custom Window Replacements 
•Pella -Andersen 
Kitchen/Bathroom 

•Carpentry 

•Decks-Porches 

Custom Room Additions 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Insured 

(708) 674-5439 



f 






Duraclean 

Rated best by 
ir\dependent tests. 




Carpet & 
Furniture 
cleaning 

CALL 
TODAY! 

(70B) 

587-2356 



Duraclean 

SPECIALISTS 

Duraclean... the standard of 
excellence for over 50 years 



HEATING & 
COOLING 

LENNOX ^ 

•QUALITY HIGH EFFICIENT 

HEATING SERVICE 

•15 POINT WINTER EFFICENCY 

CHECK 

•AIR CLEANERS-WATER 

HEATERS 
•HUMIDIFIERS 

CoiKTinvE Aters 

(708) 526-6286 
(815)459-2300^ 

J. Sowing YourCommunlly 

*A^ SALES-SERVICE 

V An Indepentdent Lennox Dealer 
\^ For 25 Years. 

LacaQy ot/tr 40 years. 



Flnandng 
AvallabVt 



24Hour 
Setvic* 



LIVING TRUST 

only $549 (offer expires 8/ 311 92) 

• PESTINE & RYAN • 

• ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW • 

708-480-8700 

Serving Northeastern Illinois 
for almost 20 years 

Your living trust includes: 

• Husband and Wife s Pour-over Wills 

• Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care 

• Durable Asset Power of Attorney 

• Preparation of Quit Claim Deed 

• Free house calls or office consultation 

• Living Will, Transfer Letters, No hidden costs. 



m: 



2BS 



BUYING 

MuifAfium Cans 

•COPPER *BRASS 
* AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-0788 

HOURS: 

Mon. - Frl. 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m. -1 p.m. 

closed 12-12:30 for lunch 

Receive 2« MORE per pound 

over our current prices on 

aluminum cans 



"^^ 



Exiiires 9-SO-9* I 



Lak«land Nttwspap«n 41 



Friday, S«pt«mb«r 4, 1992 



.aWrtCBSW**"^' 



il(l*i«iH.cti«*-4J'iJ»- 






1 1' 



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To Area Business & Sen/ices 



(7d8) 223-816 



Wilh The Highest Regard 
For Your Property 

Certified by: 

Paper Hanging Institute 

of New Jersey 

INTERIOR ■ EXTERIOR 
WALLPAPERING-PAINTING-STAINING 

(708) 395-7802 

Fully Insured Reloroncos Available 



S Fully insuroa HoiorancasrtvauHuio ^ 



Medical 



Dental 



s 



HEALTH INSURANCE 

Basic to Comprehensive 

(708) 587-4439 

Fast Courteous 

Quotes 



Individual 



Group 



■BBBBBBBHHBBHBBErBBOntSBBBOEBBBlJBBg 

1 OPTIMUM 

PAPERHANGING 

I Fine Decorative Painling •Muhicolofed spray g 

•Slaining g 

• Dry wall Repair g 

■YourSolis/aclion is My Business" | 
(708) 872-0G86 g 
(708) 658-3832 | 

Ff e 8 osiimatas'l nsurod-Graduale d g 

U.S.School ot Prolessional Paperhanglng | 

SebbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbI 






Vwo kmmm. m\. mm, no mmo^V^ 

BVSINESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 
WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

(708) 548-1300 




THE 
DIRT FACTORY 




Demolition and construction 
Debris Removal 



(708) 438-5431 

The Rosidcnlifll Specialists Free Eslimatcs 




T & C METAL CO. 

We recycle aluminum cansi 



W«olK)buy 
•Copp«f •Brat* 
•Aluminum Siding 
•Auto Radtcrtort 



BuyoK of non-ferrous motals. 
Industfkil occounts welcorie. 

815-459-4445 

Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 8-1 



•l^ad •SolnlM* 
•BattwiM 
•Calaiytic CofWMton 

376 Pralrto St. 
Crystal Lak«, IL 

1 Block S. of Hwy. 176 
Behind J 8c L Gas Station 




L 



JOHNS CARPET CLEANING SERVICE 

Quick Dry • Foam Dry System 
Vacuume(> & Shampooed 

1 Room ...$20.00 

2 Rooms........ $30.00 

Deodonzer & Silicon y 
Protectant. ,, > 
Included in Pncel!^ 

Call: 
(708) 705-9733 
(708)817-3057 

(pager) 




SSRVim YOVR PAINTING 
AND DKCORATINO NSEDS, 

Complete Interior/Exterior 

Quality Work • Neatly Done 

FREE Estimates 

Affbrdcble Prices 

■Have im job done Riairri' 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24 Ilr. Message 



SAVE MORE BUCBOTOP 

•FALL SPECIALS 

•SENIOR CmZEN DISCOUNTS 

•DRIVEWAYS 

•PARiONGUyrS 

•SEAL COATING 

•PATCHING 

•RESURFACING 

815/363-8340 

708/931-570^ 

ITOEE ESTIMATEjS 



FINANCIAL PLANNING 



Robert Ritzwoller, CPA 

• Tax Deferred Investments 

• Life/DisabilKy Insurance 

• Tax Preparation 

Free fimticmi Analysis 

Call for details 

(708) 587-4552 



jm ASPHALT ' F^^^ ESTIMATES 

laSS SEHVICES • FULLY INSURED 

m mmWm Rgsfdentlal-Commerclal 

Driveways. Sealcoaling, Bob Cat & Truck Services. Top Soil Delivery, Sod & Seeding 



Quality Service Guaranteed 



CompaiB our services and prices. Yoi/11 find you will pay less lor our professional Asphalt Services. 

B^m^^K ^0*^ iHf-i"« Let US Show you What we say is TRUE! 
(708) 336-9557 Wg wm beat tn© competition by 10%! 



FLOORS 



u- 



WALK ON 



CarpeU • Ilardwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling 

Rg§idenllal £ Commmretal tnatalitUloH 

ALL WORK CVARANTEGD 

'REE Estimates 
'(708) 356-2500 
(708)310-5220 




f 



BALED 
SHKUINGS 

1 Bale or \ ,000 

Cash & Carry 

1/2 mile north Stateline Rd. 

East ofHivy 45 on County Think CJ 

HQRTON BBOS. 

Bristol. Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Mon. - FrI. 8-5, Sat. 8-3 



1 



I LAWNWORKS I 

•Trees -f^^aintenance • Shrubs 

_^ • Sod • Boulder Walls 
^S&^ -Spring 
cEsHUmL Clean-up 
«»Tf^'^ NO JOB TOO 
•^^ SMALL! 

Reasonable 

DENNIS ADAMS 
(708) 546-3231 | 



SUNDAL 
jjj PAINTING & 

g DECORATING 

Residentral and ComitKrciol 

Fully Insured 

References 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 223-3273 

Grayslake 



tl n C A LL GARY ESTfefe IT T| 



^08) 918-7721 



CUSTOM WOOD DECK 

N bUILD SPEClW-ISr 

iCKS. PATIOS, SPAS./^ 



DESIGN. BUILD SPEC 



K 



^^AboiTipNS 4 remodelImg 
IstestiMati 



/fATE5.PR0VmEl 



-^ 




New Service for the 
Fast Paced Public 

Monty*s Repair 
Service 

,, Is now offering on site auto and \ 
'/ marine repairs. Starting April 1st. 
For details call 

(414) 857-7777 




KENDALL EXTERIORS 

• Siding • Soflit • Fascia <• Trim 

Alunntnum Seamless Gutters - 25 colors 

Specialists with Ne^ Constructiori or Hemodellns 

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED 

Ask lor John Gerbert 
We Accept Visa and Mastercard 

Days (815) 455^3036 - Eves (708) 587-8772 * 1-800-439-4036 




^\]% 




Lawn Service 

Call For Free Estimate 
(81 5) 363-1 270 





RAM. Construction 

Specializing in Carpentry 
• New 
Construction 
Remodeling 
Free Estimates - 
Insured 

ROY 
708-740-1447 



Discover 



You can do it yourself 

(708) 740-8800 

Round take Park ' 

RENTAL inc. 




'Complete Resume 

Service 

•Laser Printing 

855S. Rt. 12 

Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-4372 



HIGHLAND METALS CORPORATION 



182 Stripe Ct. 
Wdukegan, IL 
(708) 360-0880 



RscycU: 

r Alum Cans, Copper, Brass, Alutnlnum, Lead, Auto 
IBatteries and Radiators. Catalytic Converters 

FAIR PRICES*HONEST WEIGHT 



Ralph Johnson^s' 
Carpentry ^ 

^ik^'Decks •Basements 'Windows •Doors Jj 
W^ All types of Trim Work .p, 

y^ Interior/Exterior ^ 

^tji Drywall Taping ^ 

jE^ Residential & Commercial ^^ 
H Call us-Wb do it all no job too small!^ 
FR^ E Estimates ^ 

f^ Nortlibrook J^^' 

^ (708) 564-1 673 ^ ^s^\ 




DECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCTION 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 

• Custom Decks • Porches 

• Room Additions • BasemenI Remodeling 

• Balhrooms - Kitchens • Custom Caipentry 
• Improvemenls & RepairsI 

INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

Please Call Gary Kolkau 




WALLPAPERING 

Residential & 
Commercial 

Leni Baker 
(414)537-2220 

CALL FOR FREE 
ESTIMATE 



mam-- 




FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 





II 



Positive Training Witli Positive Results'* 

All training methods are not alike. Come visil us during classes and observe a di(- 
ferenl approach lo dog training. Our methods utilize food, enthusiasm and praise. 
and exercise are broken down into pieces both dogs and owners can manage. We 
have classes for puppies and older dogs, and for al levels of obedience competition 
training. For more information please give us a call. .-^ v 

20970 White Road • Antioch, IL 600O2 • (708) 838-05231 



'S 
lUINTENAHCE 

No Job Too Sfnall. I'H Do It AIL 

•Remodeling 

Kitchen';, Batlifooms & Rec Rooms 
•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

(M Types) 
•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

til Worlillerr Well Done 

FRIE ESTIMATES, CALl 
(4U)53M439 



I 



42 Lakeland N9wtpapmtt 



Friday, S«ptomb«r 4, 1992 




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See like a mlllioii 



More than a million people have 
undergone outpatient Radial 
Keratotpmy to correct 
nearsightedness and 
astigmatism. The microsurgical 
procedure is vitually painless and 
takes less than 15 minutes. And 
although Radial Keratotomy is 
not for everyone, if you qualify, 
RK can restore your natural 
vision and eliminate your need 
for eyeglasses or contact lenses. 

If you'd like to know more, please 
call 708-816-3131 to register for 
our FREE RK seminar (September 
21 at 7:00 p.m.). 






992 




Eye Care Center of Lake County 

6 Phillip Road, Vernon Hills IL 60061 

2424 Washington Street, Waukegan IL 60085 

248 E. Grand Avenue, Fox Lake IL 60020 



(708) 816-9996 
(708)244-1657 

(708) 587-9800 



Friday, Soptombor 4, 1992 



Lakakind N«wspapors 43 



'i 'i 

f 

I 



»■;'. 



state cuts 
reach parks 

The Illinois Legis- 
lature's failure to approve 
increased fees, coupled with 
budget cuts it imposed will 
result program reduction 
and total closures at 40 
state parks, including one 
in Lake County. 

In Lake County, Illinois 
Beach State Park will 
experience reduced camp 
ground check station 
operation and a reduced 
patrol of the nature pre- 
serve. 

More than 160 positions 
will be eliminated state 
wide, with 67 persons 
expected to be laid off. The 
layoffs are expected to be 
effective on Oct 15. 

Cuts imposed by the 
legislature will reduce a 
planned new Conservation 
Police Officer training class 
to 10 recruits and delay its 
start-up until next April. 



Memorial fund 
is established 

Lake County Society for 
Human Development has 
established a memorial fund 
for Albert Klass, who 
passed away on June 29. In 
1953, Klass was one of the 
original founders of the 
Retarded Children's Educa- 
tional Society, presently 
the LCSHD. 

The ultimate goal of the 
society is to assist 
individuals with disabilities 
in becoming as independent 
as possible through em- 
ployment and community 
integration. 

Klass, bom in 1907, was 
a lifelong Lake County 
resident and member of Uie 
Waukegan Moose Lodge 
for more than 50 years. 

The money received from 
the fund will be used to 
purchase needed equipment 
for the clients of the 
agency. 

For more information 
call Arlene Demb at 872- 
1700. 



Mills hosts 
blood drive 

Gumee Mills discount 
shopping mall has taken 
on the Chicago area's 
challenge of plummeting 
blood supplies following 
Labor Day weekend by 
hosting a blood drive on 
SepL 8. The drive will be 
conducted on LifeSource 
Blood Services' Mobile 
Donor Center, which will 
be parked in Parking Lot J. 

The blood drive will be 
conducted from 2 to 8 p.m. 
As a special gift for 
donors at the Gumee Mills 
Drive, LifeSource will be 
giving each a free "Live it 
Up" T-shirt 



Completes training 

Pvt. Kristen A. Spren- 
ger has completed basic 
training at Fort Jackson, 
Columbia, S,C. Sprenger, 
daughter of Jennifer A. and 
Jeffrey L. Sprenger of 
Mundelein, received instruc- 
tion in drill and ceremonies, 
weapons, map reading, tac- 
tics, military courtesy, mil- 
itary justice, first aid and 
Army history and traditions. 




PRICES AND COUPONS IN THIS AD EFFECTIVE THRU SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1 992 



BO N U S-1 B U W 




riAINOKPEMlUr 

M&M'S 



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17.80Z.BAG 



BX^M US^B UT/ 




INHAN SUMMER 

APPLE JUICE 

COCKTAIL 



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CHBE DAUS, CHEESECURIS OR CORN CHIPS 

PLANTER'S SNACKS 




61D90Z. 



BO ISI US^B U7^ 




CARAMa OR PEANUT Bima 

TWIX 

FAMILY PACK 



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ASSORTED FUVORS 

KOOL-AID 
KOOLBURSTS 



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PIANTER'S DRY ROASTER 

PEANUTS 



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SNACK-PACK 

PUDDING 



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COUPON. GOOD I 
THRU 9/6/92 



WE FILL ILLINOIS MEDICAID PRESCRIPTIONS 



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44 Lak«(and Nowspapors 



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Friday, Septemb«r4. 1992 



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Arbor Vista ready for house walk 



The Habitat for Humanity, Lake 
County will present its annual fund 
raising house walk, featuring Arbor Vista 
residences from 10 a.m. to S p.m., 
Saturday, SepL 12. 

Free bus service to the five ArbOT Vista 
homes will be available at the Lake 
County Farm Bureau, 33040, N. Hwy. 
45, just north of Rle. 120. No cars are to 
be driven to Arbor Vista due to safety 
concerns. 

Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 on the 
day of the house walk. For ticket 
information, call 623-1020. 



Habitat for Humanity, Lake County, is 
one of more than 700 affiliates of Habitat 
for Humanity International, an ecumenical^ 
Christian housing ministry. Four homes 
have been built in North Chicago and two 
more are under construction in Zioh. 

Tickets for the walk are available at: 
Cher's Village Florist and Southtown 
Florist in Mundelein, Arbour Florist. 
Lewis Florist, Leidcr's Garden Greenery, 
Duffy's Attic and Rudolph's Furniture 
Gallery in Grayslake, and Van Kirk and 
Company in Libertyville. 



:M 



ie lovely rear view of one housewalk home from 
[swimming pool lawn chair. This home, as well as 
Brious others will be featured in the Habitat for 
-,:Jumanity's Aitor Vista house walk, Sept. 12. 

tressed out? Try 
tress management 

[ A free education program, "Coping with Su'css: Arc You 
*flrcss Hardy?" will be presented from 7 to 8:30 p.m., 
ivjj'uesday, ScpL 8, in the Lakevicw Room of Good Shepherd 
ospiial. 

The program is part of a series highlighting how greater 
If-awarcncss can create a greater sense of well-being. 



■^4 




■y^. 



Best Cruise Deals 
Anywhere 

24 HOUR 
BARGAIN LINE 

356-2000 

2za4E.6RANo CALL 356-3010 Llndenhurst 

(Next to McDifialds) . 



TV's-VCR's-MICROWAVES 

FACTORY TRAINED TECHNICIANS 



Beardsley's 

Between McAree & Green Bay Rd. 
2923 SUNSET, WAUKEGAN 

623-0631 




PAINT SALE! 







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High-hiding, (ow-lustre finish 

LasiJng durability and color 

retention 

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OFF 

REG. PRICE 
LMTEOTIMEONLYI 



PAINTERS EDGE 
PAINT & STAIN CENTER 

356-3565 

__,..JMItaN.OIQi^ 
Ntvlaan RkU, Uika ' 



STOHEHOURS 

Rt •3.(1/2 Mil? n; qi Qrwg Av..) [^|^5g3"°''-FS'73' ^"^ 



ACUPUNCTURE 



is effective in a wide variety of Disorders. 

Call: Dr. R. D. Ariazi (state certified) 
3U5N Lewis Ave. 
Zion, lUinois 60099 
(708) 746-1747 

Hours by Appointment Only Closed Wed. & Fri. 




~^;;^»?^-',;<gtX??iy^^ffigawgyg^^ 



^(Dome to a 



Cnurch^vWhere 



k 



Everyone 
.^.^^ is Welcome! 

Cljrisftinti jFellobjiiljip Cljurclj 

621 Bclvidcrc Street 

Wuukegan, llliiibis 

L.R. Davis, General Pastor 

Sunday 10:00 am »S: 

Wednesday 7:30 pin 

fWiih Classes For Children) 
Fc»r More lntbrmulion Call <70S) 6S0-4455 



I 



1 



> 



h 




4 



bV^%; 



NEW 



m 



m" 



■..t 



I 






•'5 



FURNITURE SALE 
DISCOVi^TED 

40%-75% 

(Slightly Scratched/Dented) 




DRAKE'S 

OFFICE SUPPLY 

815 E. Rollins-RX. Beach 
708.223-0677 



^^Our Homeowners 
Insurance discounts 
make a good value even 
.better. 99 



ilft 




DICK WITT 

894 HiUslde, AnUoch 

395-1089 






INIUkANCt 



Call Mc lo Sec 
If You Qualify. 

l.Jkc a i«oi)d iiciglibor. Siatc Tarm i.s ilicrc. 



Siaic liirm 

rirv and Cisualiy C«impany 

I tunR- DflicL-i [ll<Miinin|iCim. tliirMiU 



Peanut Buster Parfait 




Waffle Cone Sundae 



$169 



1 




Single Hamburger* 




Barbecue Sandwich 




HRS. Sun.-Thurs. llam-9:30pm 
Fri. & Sat. 11 am-IOpm 

1215 21 St St. 4673 Grand Ave. 

ZIon, IL 872-4360 Gurnee, IL 244-5283 



•Only Available at Zion 

Offer Good 

Through Sept. 6 



Dairti 
Queen 



WE TREAT YOU MGHT 




11 



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 
9 AM - 3 PM 

® Goodwill Industries of Lake County is 

pleased to serve Gurnee and area residents with 
our Donation Trailer conveniently located at: 

REUSEI 

Visit Our Gontributrailer on the -%yS^ 

1st and 3rd Saturday of Every f^onth From 9 AM - 3 Pfvl 

Donation suggestions: clothing, dishes, housewares 
(no furniture), books, tools, toys, electronics. 

For more information cail (708) 949-4664 

Ihantyou! 



WAL • MART 

6590 Grand Avenue 






"We're Your Type 



99 



Houra: 

Monday thni Friday 

6 a.m. to'4:30 p.m. 

Sat. 6 B.m.>l2 p.m. 



(708)395-4111 

(708)395-1203 

Fax. (708) 3954232 



IS YOUR PRINTER 

HOLDING YOU UP? 

Help is on it's way. 

FAST, AFFORDABLE PRINTING 

is RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER. 




966 Victoria • Antioch 



Friday, September 4, T992 



Lakeland Newspapers 45 



Lakeland Newspapers 



I 

I 
•i' 






Parents need new bus stop before a Jchild is killed^ 



District says parents' 
plans are not safe 

by Daniel M. Becker 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Many of us remember our parents' 
exaggerated talcs regarding their daily walk 
to school. The ones where they had to 
walk uphill — both ways, fight bears and 
trudge through those gleaming, seven-foot 
high snow drifts. 

Unfortunately for children at the 
Brookhavcn development in Gumee, their 
perilous walk represents fact, not fiction. 

Due to the infamous "red-tape run- 
around," children ages 5 to 1 1 must walk 
approximately a half-mile, sometimes 
through snow, and dodge heavy, on- 
coming traffic. This journey gets them to 
a bus stop, where they must stand on one 
of the busiest streets in Gumee — 
OTlaine Road, between Grand Avenue and 
Washington Street 

These elementary school childrcn, who 
attend Gumee Grade School District 56, 
often stand, carefully watching commuter 
buses, trucks and rush hour traffic zoom 
past. 

These elementary school children de- 
serve better; they de^rve a bus stop off of 
a busy thoroughfare, parents have said. 

Three parents at Brookhaven have tried 
to spearhead a campaign as an attempt to 
move the bus stop closer to the multi- 
family development, but the school 
district says the parents' plans for a new 
stop are not feasible nor safe. 

Bobbi Scott, Barb Lockbaum and 
Bonnie Esquivel, parents of children who 
attend School District 56, have worked 
since last winter to resolve the situation 
"before somebody's child gets killed." 

After walking door-to-door, collecting a 
300-signature petition and sending it certi- 
fied mail on April 30 to Gumee Mayor 



Richard Welton, the three thought their 

children may soon be spared the dangerous 

bus stop. 
The parents say they have yet to hear 

anything from the mayor. 
The petition was reportedly also sent U> 

the school district superintendent, Wayne 

Schurter. 

"We looked at this issue about two 

years ago and review it every year," 

Schurter said. "I am going to look at it 

again with the city's village manager and 

see what can be done." 

One bus driver, noted the parents, said 
the bus service cannot take the extra five 
to 10 minutes to drive inside the housing 
development 

Another driver said, according to the 

parents, the buses cannot turn around in 
the complex because the "cul-de-sacs are 
too small." 

The Gumee Fire Department however, 
has no problem imaking the turns with its 
ladder trucks. As a general rule, the fire 
department approves a housing develop- 
ment's cul-de-sacs to ensure an adequate 
turning radius for safety concerns. 

"The turning base for a fire tmck is 
different than the one for a school bus; a 
bus cannot make that turn without 
backing up," Schurter said. "We also don't 
want an unsafe sitiiation where the school 
bus has to pull forward and then back up 
to make a turn when children are running 
for the bus." 

School District 56 Transportation 
Director Linda Miltimore, who visited the 
site on Aug. 28, had no comment when 
called. 

Despite the drawbacks, there is one final 
solution that may keep the children off 
O'Plaine Road. 

Schurter said one road in the develop- 
ment could be extended by about 30 feet 
and a bus could make a T-tum. 




Gurnee Elementary 
school children walk to 
the bus after watching 
njsh hour zoom past on 
O'Plaine Road. Parents 
from the Brookhaven 
Apartment housing com- 
plex are trying to get a 
new bus stop locale for' 
the more than 50, 
chikJren who wait at one' 
of the busiest streets in 
Gurnee. — Photo by 
Daniel M. Becker 



BUY IT 
SELL IT 
RENT It 

Lakeland Classified 

(708)223-8161 



SHOREWOOD FOODS 

C, You Have To Play ♦ 
? To Win!! ^ 



Your Offlclil 
Lotto Location 




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* Made Right At Shorawood : 

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*^v^-:r:^*ltalian {Mild & Hoi) *^- -"'' 

^' p 'Polish 

f •Breaklast (Links & Patties) 

708-546-4950 

SHOREWOOD RD., ROUND LAKE 






Alitfle 

Birdie 

Told Me... 

. Antioch Manor is the 
Y/ place to be! 

There the living is easy 
and always worry-free! 

CaU 395-0949 
2> Bedi*ooin Apts. 

OFFERING rm ADVAOTAGE OF QUIET 

COUOTRY LIVING, 

CONVENIENCE OF QUAU'IY SHOPPING, 

FINE SCHOOLS AND AN ABUNDANCE 

OF RECREATION JUST MINUTES AWAY. 

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MANOR 



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Ask About Oar 84-Hour 

Service GuaranLec! 




C«oilC*nniiAWH 
Ml llWfT Inclml 



46 lakokind N«wspap«f« 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



I''_'1-SV^ 




ke 



IlET 



JCY 



'OlbAWM 



Botanic Garden's new course 



with the opening of 
Smithsonian 
titution's Traveling 
bit, "Tropical 
orests: A 
sappeaiing Treasure 
e Chicago Botanic 
den on Jan. 4, 1993, 
era! rainforest pro- 
s have tieen sched- 
!cd as part of the 
cago Botanic Garden's 
course guide. The 
forest exhibit will run 
ough March 28. 

jS The first program, 
j"Costa Rican Odyssey, 

fl be a lecture presented 
the Friends of Cerros 
Escazu of Costa Rica, 
ch is an organization 
g to preserve the nat- 
cnvironmcnt of the 
icazu area. The featured 
ealccr will be William 
Burger, Ph.D., curator of 
[^botany at tlte Field 
^Museum of Natural 
^Istory. Burger will pre- 
^Knt a visual adventure of 
^the incredible diversity of 
l^sta Rica's flowering 
^plants. 

? (> A series of "Rainforest 
^Readings" are also sched- 
' cd for the fall. This se- 
es of four discussions 



will be led by Carol 
LaChapelle, writer and 
teacher, and will cover an 
anthology of readings to 
develop a better under- 
standing of the tropical 
rainforest 

A lecture entitled 
living with the 
Rainforest in the 
Twenty -First Century" will 
cover die issue of how 
people can learn to 
co-odst with the rainfor- 
est. The lecture is spon- 
sored by the Chicago 
Rainforest Action Group 
and will feature interna- 
tional spcaicers. 

There will also be a 
program on rainforests for 
7 to 9 year -olds as part of 
the series of children's 
programs. "Rainforest 
Wonders" will include a 
walk through the Botanic 
Garden's tropical green- 
house and vivid Jungle 
videotapes. 

In addition to the rain- 
forest programs, the 
course guide includes 
classes in horticulture, 
landscape design, nature 
and botanical craJFts. 

Among the 12 classes 
offered In horticulttire are 




a session on fall garden 
care, a herbal harvest 
workshop, starting and 
building a rock garden, a 
discussion about wildlife 
and your garden, two 
classes about bonsai and 
three classes about 
perennials. 

Four courses are of- 
fered on landscape de- 
sign, including "Bulbs for 
Your Garden" which will 
Introduce participants to 
the best bulbs for Chicago 
area gardens and a 
three -day workshop 
about landscape design 
and graphics for residen- 
tial and small 
commercial properties. 

Several walks are 
scheduled as part Of the 
nature courses. They are 
an English Walled 
Garden Walk, a Fall Color 
Walk and a series of Fall 
Bird Walks In which 
participants can learn 
about Neotropical birds 
that migrate through the 
Botanic Garden to 
summer in North America 
and spend winter in the 
tropics. 

The botanical craft 
courses include basket- 



making, flower arranging, 
papermaJdng and holiday 
cr^ts. The holiday crafts 
include a potpourri holi- 
day worlcshop and a ses- 
sion on making everlast- 
ing dried holiday wreaths. 
Family programs such 
as a desert walk In the 
Garden's cactus green- 
house and children's 
programs such as "Prairie 



Days," a session that 
teaches about America's 
natural prairie heritage, 
are also listed in the 
course guide. 

Two tours are offered 
as well. They are a trip to 
the Fernwood Botanic 
Garden and the Tabor 
Hill Winery in 
southwestern Michigan 
and a walking tour of the 



Chicago Botanic Garden's 
outdoor sculpture. 

The new course guide 
also includes three sym- 
posia: "Managing Stream 
Landscapes," "Perennials: 
Beyond the Border" and 
Sacred Spaces." 

To obtain a copy of the 
September to December 
course guide, call 
(708)835- 8261. 



Mid-American regions orcliid sliow set 



We have soznetbing special to show the do-it-yourselfers. 
WB: 

• Are a well established family owned business since 1967. 

• Specialize in full sized specimen trees, shrubs, ornamental 
trees and evergreens. All have a full 2 year guarantee 

• Are open 7 days a week - 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. 

• Have a low cost delivery service which Includes setting the 
plants in prepared holes. No matter how BIG. Same day 
service arallable. 

• Have just re-stocked our sales yard for the Fall season with a 
great selection of nursery stock. 

• Offer FREE Information and Design Service. 

• Offer FREE 24 hour tool rental service. (Deposit required) 

VlsH Our Odd Lot - 1 of a Kind Section for Discounts up to 70%. 
FREE LANDSCAPE SEMINAR 

Saturday, Sept. 12, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

We will be open Labor Day, 
Monday, September 7th, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



4,1992 



More than 1,000 or- 
chids will be on display as 
the Illinois Orchid Society 
presents the Mid -America 
Orchid show and sale on 
Sept 26 and 27 at the 
Chicago Botanic Garden. 
The show Is scheduled 
from 9:30 a.ni. to 5 p.m. 
on Saturday, Sept 26 and 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on 
Sunday, Sept. 27. 

This year's show is ex- 
pected to be the largest 
ever as 50 orchid societies 
from all over die country 
have been Invited to par- 
ticipate in the show. The 
Mid-America region in- 
cludes 12 states (Illinois, 

5k 



Iowa, Kentucky, 
Minnesota, Missouri, 
Nebraska, Wisconsin, 
Michigan, Ohio, Georgia, 
Mississippi and parts of 
Florida) and also Toronto, 
Canada. 

Judges will evaluate 
105 classes of orchid 
plants for ribbons and 
special awards. A special 
feature of the show will be 
a tent in the Botanic 
Garden's rear parking lot 
where more than 30 
vendors will be selling a 
variety of orchid materials 
and supplies. 

Lectures and slide pre- 
sentations will be 



ongoing throughout 
Saturday and Sunday 
afternoon and a "Now 
What?" table will provide 
advice on orchids. Special 
photo sessions are also 
scheduled from 7:30 to 
8:30 a.m. on Saturday, 
Sept 26 and from 7:30 to 9 
a.m- on Sunday, Sept 27. 

These sessions are the 
only time photography 
will be allowed. 

The Chicago Botanic 
Garden Is located on 
Lake-CookRoadin 
Glencoe. For additional 
information, call (708) 
835-5440. 



HAyRIDE& 

lAUNTED BARNS 

HOT LINE 

708-HAY-RIDE (429-7433)] 

or DIAL DIRECT 708-223-8288 

2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER! 

DAY & NIGHT AVAILABLE 

^ . .^^ FARMER 



•»%»• 






546-5160 



Rte. 120 al Cedar Lake Ftoad 
3 Miles W. Of GrayslakQ 



32800 N. HWY. 45 

(Rts.45&120) 

GRAYSLAKE, lUINOIS 60030 

(708) 223-8280 

' 25 MIN. S. OF FARMER BROW^f S 

CALL TODAY FOR 

INFORMATION, 
RESERVATIONS & 
FRE£ BROCHURE 



BROWN'S 
FARMS 

HWY. 50 

BRISTOU Wl 

25 MIN. K. OF 

DUTCH GARDENS 






Friday, September 4. 1992 



Laicetand Newspapers 47 



l^^^f<- 



»:a5ii4JS£:ij*^-- 



-Vjt**- ■ fc*i-.^^-toi« * ^« 



•:■ iLV 



fcCt 




tA.^^'^ 



Lalceland 

Nc%v6pQpcrs 



•■"M 



Pruning: It means more than an annual haircut 



If I^kc County home- 
owners think that pruning 

is merely a seasonal "hair- 
cut" for plants, trees and 

shrubs, then you're prob- 
ably not getting all that 



you can from your land- 
scape. 

The Garden Council 
suggests making sure you 
know exactly why you are 
pruning before taking 
shears in hand. Have a 



tr 



II ■ I 



h: 




plan In mind and re- 
member that not all 
plants are pruned at the 
same time or for the same 
reason. 
Prune with a purpose 

The foremost purpose 
for pruning Is to maintain 
a hcaJthy plant by correct- 
ing defects. The removal 
of dead, injured or dis- 
eased wood should be 
done as soon as possible. 
These limbs when left on 
shrubs and trees, invite 
pest attacks and disease 
that eventually threaten 
the entire plant. 

Once dead wood Is 
eliminated, tackle super- 
fluous growth that might 
eventually spoil the ap- 
pearance of your plant, 
ncmove lower branches 
that have been shaded 
out. If one branch grows 
directly above the other, 
remove one of them to 
give the other access to 
light. If one branch 
crosses another or rubs 
against It, remove the of- 
fender. Cut out branches 
that grow into the plant 

Also remove water 
sprouts — ^vigorous 
branches that grow stiffly 
upward in the interior of 
the plant. If a young tree 
forks into two leaders, re- 
move one while it is small 
to preserve the upright 
form of the tree and pre- 



I 'V- 



r 



It's Time to Enjoy 






Garden 
Mums 



Chrysanthemums 

America's Most Popular Perennials 

Throughout North America, garden mums are known and 
appreciated as the plant for fall blooming. Untold millions of 
garden mums are planted each spring, summer and fall. 
With proper care and a bit of help from Mother Nature, 
garden mums offer the potential to flower again and again 
every autumn. 



ALSO: 

ASTERS, 

Flowering 

Cabbage 

and Kale, 

and Pansies 



VERSATILE USES 



**/ 



r=Jt:lrJ 



>ms^.-.^:i*- 



PATIO PLANTS - 

Use garden mums on 
patios, decks, from door 
steps, in window boxes 
and by the pool. 



L>\%-^ 



■•^TO '• 



Leiders 



BEDDING PLANTS ' 

Garden mums are 
superb for use as 
specimens in (oundalion 
planiings. massed in 
beds or grouped in 
plantings o( 3 or 5 for 
colorful and dramatic 
focal points in the 
landscape. 



GARDEN GREENERY INC 



Phone:223-2422 

Located 2 miles north of Grayslake on the corner of Rte. 83 & Lake Street 

. ^^ ^^ '= s ^^ ^^ 

45 Lakokind N«wspap«rs 






vent possible splitting 
later. 

Dense shrubs need to 
be thinned out periodi- 
cally to make sure the in- 
ner and lower branches 
receive the sunlight and 
air necessary for survival. 

Regular pruning is nec- 
essary to control plant 
size. Even overgrown trees 
and shrubs can be re- 
duced with carcfiil thin- 
ning. It's best to call In an 
expert for large tree woric, 
but you can easily main- 
tain small trees and 
shrubs by cutting back 
branches to a 
well-positioned side 
branch or bud. To direct 
growth upward, cut to a 
bud or branch on the in- 
side of the branch you are 
trimming; to spread the 
plant outward, cut to an 
outward -facing bud or 
branch. 

Make the cut just 
above a bud, being carefiil 
not to leave a stub. To re- 
move an undesired limb, 
make the cut just outside 
the swollen area, where 
the branch meets the 
main stem. 

These correct pruning 
techniques will quicken 
the healing process and 
minimize the chance for 
infection. 
Flowering shrubs 



Flowering shrubs have 
their own^ special pruning 
schedule guided by 
blooms. Shrubs that form 
their flower buds one year 
prior to bloom (azaleas, 
forsythias and rhodo- 
dendrons), should be 
pruned one to two weeks 
after the blossoms have 
fallen. That allows the 
shrubs the time necessary 
to set next season's flower 
buds before winter 
begins. A fall pruning of 
these plants sacriflces 
next year's flowers. 

Slirubs that blossom 
in the summer or fail 
(buddleia, tamarix, and 
summer flowering 
spLrea), can be pruned in 

the early spring or late 
falL If you choose to 
prune them in fall, wait 
until they have become 
dormant. 
Evergreens 

The pruning of ever- 
green trees and shrubs 
varies by particular groups 
and species. Flowering 
evergreens (hollies, 
heaths and mountain lau- 
rels) follow the same 
pruning as for deciduous 
flowering shrubs, whUc 
non -flowering evergreens 
like hemlocks, yews and 
junipera can be reshaped 
as much as you like. 
However, some needled 
conifers grow so slowly. 



they rarely need to be cut 
back. 

Spruces and firs are 
seldom pmned except to 
remove one of the twin 
leaders that might de- 
velop after an injury. 
Pines likewise are seldo 
pruned when allowed tt 
grow as forest trees Of 
massive specimens, but 
they arc easily shaped 
into picturesque forms 
(bonsai or giant bonsai) or| 
thirmed out to enhance or 
frame a view. 

Limb removal can be 
done anytime but shear- 
ing of new growth should 
oidy be done in early to 
mid-summer. Size can be 
controlled, and 
branching encouraged, by 
shortening the "candles" 
of new growth when they 
have attained fiill length 
in late spring. 

Traditionally, pruning 
has been regarded as a 
late fall/winter gardening ^ 
activity because the form 
of the plant is easily ob- 
served at tills time of year. \^i 
However, pruning can be hI 
done whenever the saw is 
sharp. Then you can be 
assured of healthy, 
well-shaped plants all 
year round. The Garden 
Council suggests consult- 
ing a local nursery for the 
answers to any individual 
pruning quesUons. 



ITHIUfPtSei 

I Farm Stand ( 

Same Smile A tocalfon For 49 Yean 

In Season We Grow Everything 
TOP QUALITY FRUITS & VEGETABLES 



Our Own Sweet 

Com 1« now 

readyi Picked 

Fresh 

Daily 




Our Famous 

White Corn 

is now ready 
♦S'" sack 



(great for froflzlng) 



-PEPPERS- 

• Hot & Sweet Banana 

• Melrose 

• Bell (^ ^95 

(smaller | g^ 

amount avail.) bushel 



Fresh Fruit 



• Plums 

• Grapes 

• Nectarines 

• Georgia Peaches 



A Full Line of Fresh Vegetables 

• Large Idaho Bakers 690 lb. 

• Large Green Cabbage. . 19e lb. 

• Snnall Zucchini 69C lb. 

• Medium Zucchini 4/$1 

• Large Zucchini 2/$1 




Bed, Ripe, Ice Cold 
Watermelon! 



16^^ 




lb 



{1/2 & 1/4 cuts &J»ghtly higher) 



Green Beans 
$-1295 

■ ^" bushel 



Our Own 

Vine Ripened 

Tomatoes 



are now ready 
picked fresh doily 



,'j^r' 



Pfu>"" 




For Cunning 

Med. •12"Vbushel • Small slightly higher 
Free Dill with purchase 

• Beets • Zucchini 



Hours: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m., 7 days a week 
Wb reserve the right to limit quantity. Prices In effect while quantities last 

Located 1 1/2 mi. North of Lake Cook Rd. on U.S. 12 



438-4440 






— I 

Friday, Seplembef 4, 1992 >j 



I' 



^ 



( i»;".'-^i/'>i- j>:'-f *9^^ 



V' 



•%iV' 



md 




v^ 



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Lakeland 

NcwDpapcro 



ml 



le cut 3 






are 
eptto 
win 
le- 

A: 

leldom 
ed to 
or 
but 
led 
rms 
isai) or 
inceor 

an be 
hear- 
ihould 
iyto 
can be 

ged. by^ 
idles" 
nthey 
ength 

iruning 
as a 
dening 
3 form 
yob- 
ofyear. 
can be 
3 saw is 
n be 



!aU 

irdcn 

Dnsuit- 

forthc 

lividual 



H 



reen shopp 

Each day one hears 
lore and more news 
lOUt the environmental 
pact of the products 
|nes uses and the way 
tey live. The good thing 

lut this news is that 
icre are so many ways to 
iducc and eliminate the 
invironmental damage 
iveryone does. Beginning 
home — not only by re- 
cling all the products, 
om fuurniture to gro - 
iries — that are environ - 
len tally friendly. 

When one begins to 
:hange purchasing 
labits, individual com- 
lanies and manufactur- 
notice. We all can 
[maicc a difference. For 
example, a relatively 
small number of cus- 
tomer complaints about 
the use of plastic foam 
[caused a major fast-food 
jchain to completely 
change its product pacic- 
aging to reduce environ - 
[mental waste. 

According to envi- 
[ronmental experts, one 
ig everyone can do to 
lelp save the planet is to 
look for products that are 
Inot hannfiil to the envi- 
onment, and buy from 
[companies with good en- 
iyi ronmental records. In ' 
ither words, became a 
green shopper." 
Some tips in shop- 



ers help improve homes 

ping for "green" items in 
elude: 

•Purchase energy-efli 
clent air conditioners, 
refrigerators, washers, 



dryers and dishwaters. 
These appliances will 
also reduce electric and 
gas bills. 




•To cut down on water 
waste, install low-flow 
shower heads, faucet 
aerators and toilet dams. 
They can be bouj^t at 
most local hardware 
stores. 

•Give up aerosol 
sprays which destroy the 
ozone layer of the atmo - 
sphere. 

•When purchasing a 



home fire extingubher, 
look for halon-free mod- 
els. Halon extinguishers 
have 10 times the ozone- 
damaging potential of 
the chloronuorocarbons 
(CFCs) found in aerosols, 
refrigeration and other 
products. 

•Avoid ftimiture made 
from exotic, endangered 
woods such as mahogany, 
teak, ramin, lauan and 
meranti, as most are im- 
ported from the tropical 
rain forests. Instead, 
check to see that the fur- 
niture is made from one 
of the more abundant 
North American woods, 
such as oak, maple and 
pine. 

•Never purchase 
furniture made with 
plastic foam cushioning. 
Almost all foam 
cushioning contains CFCs 
or methylene chloride. 

•When buying gro- 
ceries or personal prod- 
ucts at the supermarket or 
drugstore, look for prod- 
ucts made from recycled 
materials and packaged 
in recyclable or reusable 
containers. Avoid prod- 
ucts with excessive pack- 
aging or made with 
harmful chemicals (like 
CFCs). And don't forget to 
recycle paper grocery 
bags or use canvas 
shopping bags. 



Reg. »419 




Real Toros. 
Unreal prices. 



TORQ 



*No Interest - No Pajrments UntU April x, X99S. 



[99 



NOW 

$299®^ 



Mode! 20217 
The Rccyclcr® Mower 
21" Hand Propelled 
5 Horsepower 



Reg, "519- J^QW 

) $399^^ 




Model 20218 
The Rccyclcr® 
Mower 
21- Self 
Propelled 
5 Horsepower 




Reg. •664- NOW 

$49995 



Model 20320 

The RccyctcrtS) 

Mower 

21' Self Propelled 
5 Horsepower 
Overhead Valve 
Oagglng Kll 
IncTtidcd 



*For Qualified Buyers Until October 3, 1992. 



uea,erwner«- WFEEDSALES 

$»i-uiv$^iAndMlAdiusi(mnts . Rt.120 &SIUSSerSt 223-6333 





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l\A^^ial Bl Supply, Inc. 

"Decor^^^Mt^pe Material** 
ION. Fairfield, Round Lake (708) 740-3203 



■*■■»■■**■«■■**■ 




SALE! SALE! SALE! 

LABOR DAY WEEKEND SPECIAL 

40% OFF ALL 



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Nursery Stock 

•Shade & Ornamental Trees 

• Flowering Shrubs 

• Evergreens 



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Planting 



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OPEN 

LABOR 

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9 AM - 2 PM 



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(708) 740-3203 Mon Fri 7 6 

,^ . u I .A Sat 7-4; Sun 9-2 

(Conveniently located 

between Rt. 134 & Rt, 120) 



Videos Available On Request 



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Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 49 



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—4 






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GET "IT" OFF 

YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



].ipse:rvice ji 

ITS THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 26) 

buy a visitor pass in order to use it I think it's about 
time Round Lake got what the rest of the people around 
here have-a beach, or at least a boat ramp for the 
residents. When you buy a house they tell you what 
you are going to get, but after you buy it-it's too late. 

Form a separate district 

The LibertyviUe High School referendum is going on 
the ballot again, and I believe the true issue is not being 
properly addressed. The problem of overcrowding will 
continue, and we'll have to keep building until it is 
fmally recognized that Vernon Hills needs to form its 
own district. When theCunco property is developed, 
which is an unfortunate inevitability, what will happen 
then? Do we really want a huge high school for our 
kids? I realize that LibertyviUe will lose part of the 
Hawthorne Mall tax base if the towns form separate 
districts, but wouldn't the increased building costs offset 
the supposed advantage? Besides the simple economics, 
let's examine the other factors involvcd-namcly, how 
best to serve the students, families and communities. 

Don't scream for him 

Hi, I'm calling in regard to the Party concert at Gumcc 
Mills on Thursday, Aug. 27. I'd like to tell all the girls 
that went to thai concert who were screaming for one of 
the members of the Party to "shut up" because he is on 
drugs. I don't see how they can like -people like that. 

A solution for our problems 

You want to know why America is messed up? Here's 
why: the Democratic Congress, the legalization of 
abortion and getting away from Christian values. If 
everybody went to church and we went back to the 
white, Anglo-saxon, protestanl ways that we built our 
country on--if we could get back to that, we wouldn't 
have the problems we have today. Thank you. 

Thoughts on the bike ban 

I'm calling in regard to the Antioch bicycle ban in the 
downtown a*ea. Why didn't they just tiy to talk to the 
kids first and explain bicycle safety? Why jump the gun 
and have the police crack down on these kids for riding 
on the sidewalks? They are setting a bad example for 
the young bike riders by having the police intimidate 
them. It teaches the kids at a young age the wrong 
attitude toward the police, which will only make the 
police officers' jobs tougher when these kids get older 
and try to etude the police by hiding and being sneaky. 
A problem no one (k)es anything about is the driving 
habits of some of the older folks on the streets. I'm a 
35-ycar-old bike rider,. I can't tell you how many times 



iBatricia's 

AMISH 
FURNITURE 

di^ Qifiware 

395 Lake St. 
^Antioch 395-4780 
jCompfeie Line ol Sdid Oak 
FumKure & Much Mofel 
Stop In Today 
MofvTuw-Tliuni 10 lo 6 
Fri1Qlo7:Sal10to5; 
Sundays 1 1 to 4. 
Closed Wed. 




BARK 'N' TOWN 

_^_, KENNELS^ 

* 

^ •Boarding | 
'Gfooming 'Pel Supplies 



27607 W. Brandenburg Rd., 
Ingleside ■"■'.■ /.v 



II 



I've almost been hit by older drivers who barely have 
control of (heir vehiclcs-and who get on the sidewalks 
instead of staying on the streets. Their licenses should 
be taken away if they can't keep their cars on the streets. 

The answer is still "No" 

This is in regards to LibertyviUe High School. The 
superintendent and his board should go back to school 
and leam what the word "No" means. They teach it to 
the students, but I don't think they know what it is 
themselves. They put up a green house for rooms; they 
didn't even have enough brains to make it a little red 
schoolhousc. The answer to the vote is still "No," 
regardless of how many little greenhouses you put up 

there. 

Senior citizen asks for help 

I am a resident of Lake Villa on Oakwood Avenue, by 
the sewage plant, and I'm a disabled senior citizen. I 
would like to know if the village would come up here, 
cut the bushes that are hanging over the road and pick 
up all the beer cans along here because it looks worse 
than Herbie's Junk Yard. And, I was wondering if the 
mayor could take a ride up here and check it out because 
her road is immaculate. Thank you. 

Punishment too severe 

Hi, I'm from Antioch. This is a response to the caller 
who called about Tom Fisher suing the village of 
Antioch. First of all, he is not suing the village; he is 
suing Chief Miller as a person and as a police officer. 
Money involved will not come out of our taxes; it will 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



come out of insurance. The oUict two people, Susan 
Milschneidcr and Mike Culat are also suing Miller, not 
the village. Even if they were guilty, the punishment 
was way loo severe for the crime. I could sec thcni 
getting a slap on the wrist or getting suspended, but 
getting fired? That's ridiculous. 

Time for a change 

Hi, rm firom Antioch. Where is the Antioch leadership? 
The trustees and politicians are all at the country clubs 
and golf courses. All the departments of Antioch arc 
there also-it's one, big happy family. There is too, loo 
much nepotism. I'm in the midst of it; I see it all. What 
time is it? It's lime for a change. We need new trustees 
and politicians. No more meetings behind closed doors 
which are anonymous. 

Land of the free 

I'm calling in regard to the Speak English message in 
the Aug. 28lh issue. I quote "This is America; so speak 
English." This is supposed to be the land of the free, 
where we believe in the First Amendment~not 
Germany, 1942. 

Underfunded pensions 

I would like the public to know that teachers have paid 
1.5 percent of their salary towards Social Security since 
1989, of which they arc not entitled to withdraw any 
benefits. Our pension is deducted from our salary, to be 
matched by the stale-but each year the stale has 
underfunded the amount 









SALE 
$290 



Traditional Chippendale '^^ 



GET "IT" OFF 
YOUR CHEST 

Lakeland Newspaper's nev\/est service, 

'LIRSBRVICE' .allows you to get 'it' off 
your chest. 

Complaints, compliments, Ideas, opinions 
on any subject. Whatever "if Is, we'll take 
your call and print It In all 14 editions of 
Lakeland Newspaper's new 'LIPSERVICE" 
column. 

So if you haye something to say, Just dial 
223-8073 and give It some 'LIPSERVICE'. We're 
good listeners. 

LIPSERVICE 

lt*s the talk of the town. 

223-8073 







SALE 
$223 




Contemporary Mirage ™ 





With state- 
of-the-art- 
technology& 
Homestead's 
commitment 
to quality, 
you can liave 
it all! 

FAN-tastic 
sale prices 
through 
Sept. 30th, 
Fixtures and 
down rods 
additional 
Sophisticated 
styles in sizes 
from 29"- 56" 
provide you 
with a 
functional 



m 

m. 





SO Lakoland Nowspapsrs 



/ 



Friday, September 4, 1992 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 




St. Joseph's hosts blood drive 



Making a Point 



U.S. Senate candidate Rich Williamson takes a point made by George Eveiitt 
at the Lake County Republican Central Committee annual Family Picnic, 
Aug. 30 at Holiday Park in Ingleside. "This is a day for the entire family. The 
family picnic is for all Republicans of Lake County," said Lake County 
Republican Chairman Robert Churchill. — Photo by Ray Plum 



Every three seconds 
someone needs blood. In 
recognition of the needs, St. 
Joseph Catholic Church, 
North Lincoln Avenue in 
Round Lake is hosting a 
blood drive on Sunday, 
Sept. 6. The drive will be 
held in the parish hall from 
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Blood 
drive chairperson Terry 
Landwehr asks the public to 
stop by and give blood that 
day. 

September is National 
Cholesterol Education 
Month. In addition to pro- 
viding every blood donor 
with a free cholesterol 
screening, LifcSource will 
be giving all September 
blood donors a free packet 
including cholesterol con- 
trol educational information 
and coupons. Teaming up 
with LifeSourcc to promote 
volunteer blood donations 
this month are Dole. 
Healthy Choice, Do- 
minick's and the National 
Heart, Lung and Blood In- 
stitute. 

LifeSource reports a 



chronic shortage of blood. 
iBlood types O and B are es- 
pecially short, but all blood 
types are asked to volunteer. 
All LifeSource donors in 
the Chicagoland area who 

Divorces 



donate through Sept 8, at 
mobile blood drives are 
eligible to win: an 
overnight stay for two at 
the North Shore Hilton and 
Towers in Skokie. 



Divorce list from August 
20 through August 26: 

Cathaleen and Raymond 
WiUiam Petersen, Mima J. 
Montenegro and John R. 
Rokoich, Carol S. and Charlet J. 
Johnaon, Beverly and Mathaniel 
Lee Hoskins, Allan J. and 
Marianne R. Sjoholm, Laura and 
Richard Bates, Laura and Jeffeiy 
Swanson, Cathiyn L and Jerry L. 
Smith, Anita Marie and Joieph 
Lee Damien Branch, 

Laura Ann and Michael John 
Dunn, Virginia K. and Michael B. 
Roberts, Jennifer A. and Rrfjcrt 
W. Isoulo. Tami Marie and 
Timothy S. Kcphait, Debra R. and 
Russell H. Kroncke, Wendy A. 
and Robert Stannard, Danielle C 
and Robert C. Laskowski, Susan 
Lee and Alexander John 
Tiahnybok, Magdalena T. and 
Alfonso M. Gonzalez, Isabell and 
Jose Rcxlriguez, 

Gloria Laskarakis and 
Kostandinos Shinas, Mary and 
Steven Knodlc, Pamela S. and 



David C. Otto, Mary B. and 
Thomas W. Bock, Liane M. and 
William A. D'Andrca, Virginia 
Adan-Rodriguez and Anitonto 
Ocampo, Michele V. Poulos and 
Thomas A Poulos, Sandra L; and 
Patricio Salazar, Ana E. Campos 
and Daniel E. Campos, Emily 
Ad aline Murray and Johnnie 
Haskel Hamm, Emily P. and 
Vernon C. Rosemin, 

Irma Jean and David West, 
Evelyn and Charles C. Henon, 
Tanya Marie and Webster Allen 
GriffJlh, Verletz and Darryl 
Cameron Bailey, Cheryl and 
Lawrence Evitts, Barbara and 
James Pesz, Maumen and Dean 
Walker, Linda Lee Michalowicz 
and Thomas Paul Podock, 

Christine H. and Bodo B. 
Koppe, Dorene L. and Richard J. 
Herr, Eileen M. and Michael L, 
Kaspcr, Jc^ V. and Jcannine C. 
MenilJ, Dlene M. and Kenneth L. 
Brodack, Patricia and Blaise 
Fallon, Jane and Duaine Yearout, 
Rube Juanita and Rigoberto 
Gutierrez. 



I If you would like ^ 
J to take the S 
S gamble out of S 
^ buying the right ^ 
N set of golf clubs, ^ 



1 



Pro Circle has a 

very good track 

record. Ask 

your golfing 

friends about 

us. We can 

help LOWER 

your score. 



I 






We Sincerely Feel We Have The Best Chrysler Service Dept. Anywhere 



PRO CIRCLE GOLF 
1810N. Rt. 12 
Spring Grove ' 

\ (81 5) 675-2747 , 









4. 1992 



NEW, EXCITING 

ANTIQUE SHOW 



ANTIQUES 

COLLECTIBLES 

JEWELRY 

The best and brightest 

of our 30 Dealers 
display of the unique . 



price. 

WHERE: 

Antioch's Lovely 

REGENCY INN 

350 Hwy. 1 73 

WHEN: 

Friday, September 25 

Saturday, September 26 

From: 12 Noon to 

7 P.M. each day. 

PRESENTED BY: 



PARK AVENUE 

ANTIQUE MALL 

345 Park Ave. 

Antloch, IL 60002 

Brenda Case 

Proprietor 

(708) 838-1 624 

(Parking on side" st.) 



i* 



•deceived Chrysler Service Professional Award 

(BMtd on custonnw suiveys) 

•Host Modem, Up-To-Date Equipment 
•Computer Engine Analyzer 
•Computer Wheel Balancer 
•Computer 4 Wheel Aligner 



•Many Special Chrysler Tools 
•Complete Chrysler Technical Library 
•Access to Chrysler Engineers 
•Certified Mechanics 
•Continuous Factory Training 
•We Know Our Product 



•Very Competitive Pricing 

•Large Inventory Of O.E. Parts 

•20 Years of Sen/ice To The Community 

•Our Success Is Based On Report 

Business, and Referrals From 

Satisfied Customers 



Q/Dopor 



CHRYSLER MOTOPS 
GENUirjE PAfTTS 




Be Jusi 




Fi 








QChopor 



CHnySLEn motors 
GENUINE PAtrrs 







Get an oil change* and get a free oil filter, plus three 
commemorative Olympic Games videos, valued at 
$59.95. See your service advisor for the free filter. Visit the 
showroom for the free videotapes offer. 

*Chr>'slcr Corporation vehicles only. 



Ontopor 

CUSTOMER CARE 



Of f cui. $io<son V ThC 
rmus CinmOUM 



USA 




Friday, September 4, 1992 



Lakokind Newspapers SI 



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Friday, September 4, 1992